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  • FIRST POST
    • squeaky
    • By squeaky 28th Feb 08, 11:38 AM
    • 13,808Posts
    • 15,843Thanks
    squeaky
    Quick questions on bread making
    • #1
    • 28th Feb 08, 11:38 AM
    Quick questions on bread making 28th Feb 08 at 11:38 AM
    Hiya,

    We have a large collection of threads on bread makers. Lots of recipes, tips, and questions. So your first port of call may answer your query, and if you spot a thread that is very similar - then by all means join it and ask. (We do not consider follow-up or additional questions to be "hijacking" somebody's thread. It really helps to keep similar questions in one place. Honest )

    The Complete Breadmaking Collection

    The two main threads which contain tips and recipes and a wealth of information about the bread makers that Old Style members highly recommend are these:-

    I am in love with my Panasonic breadmaker

    The Morphy Richards fastbake BM Club



    Over to you...
    Hi, I'm a Board Guide on the Old Style and the Consumer Rights boards which means I'm a volunteer to help the boards run smoothly and can move and merge posts there. Board guides are not moderators and don't read every post. If you spot an inappropriate or illegal post then please report it to forumteam@moneysavingexpert.com. It is not part of my role to deal with reportable posts. Any views are mine and are not the official line of MoneySavingExpert.

    Never ascribe to malice that which is adequately explained by incompetence.
    DTFAC: Y.T.D = 5.20 Apr 0.50
Page 1
  • JennyW
    • #2
    • 17th Apr 08, 7:12 AM
    My fresh yeast didn't froth?
    • #2
    • 17th Apr 08, 7:12 AM
    I got some fresh yeast from my local bakers yesterday in order to use some in my bread machine. From the advice here on how to "start it off", I added the block to warm water and sugar. It fizzed a little bit (bit like flat coke) but that was it? :confused: I assumed it was supposed to froth up?

    Anyway I continued to use it and I still had a lovely loaf.

    So is it OK if it doesn't always froth up? (I waited for about 15 minues).

    just to add - it did fizz quite a lot when I poured it over the flour?
    Last edited by JennyW; 17-04-2008 at 7:20 AM.
    • Biggles
    • By Biggles 17th Apr 08, 8:26 AM
    • 7,611 Posts
    • 5,016 Thanks
    Biggles
    • #3
    • 17th Apr 08, 8:26 AM
    • #3
    • 17th Apr 08, 8:26 AM
    I had the same problem. I'd been used to using dried yeast for years but have recently started to get fresh yeast from the local baker. I waited for the froth but none came.

    I now use it when it's bubbling well and it works fine. And yes, it does start to fizz a lot if you stir it, though I have yet to try pouring it on the floor
    ;-)
  • JennyW
    • #4
    • 17th Apr 08, 8:30 AM
    • #4
    • 17th Apr 08, 8:30 AM
    I now use it when it's bubbling well and it works fine.
    Originally posted by Biggles
    so is yours now fizzing up? Just wondering what I'm doing wrong :confused:
    • Seakay
    • By Seakay 17th Apr 08, 8:41 AM
    • 4,173 Posts
    • 10,055 Thanks
    Seakay
    • #5
    • 17th Apr 08, 8:41 AM
    • #5
    • 17th Apr 08, 8:41 AM
    If you cream the yeast and sugar together and then stir in the warm water you are more likey to get a froth occuring. Some people like to cream in a couple of spoonfuls of flour as well before adding the water.
    As you have found, fresh yeast is very easy to work with, and all of these preparations are really just to ensure a speedy reaction - said reaction can happen without them.
  • JennyW
    • #6
    • 17th Apr 08, 8:45 AM
    • #6
    • 17th Apr 08, 8:45 AM
    thanks seakay. I will try this method too.

    How long does the frothing take? a couple of minutes or 10/15?

    However, if the froth doesn't happen, can I just carry on and use it?
  • Gingham Ribbon
    • #7
    • 17th Apr 08, 9:06 AM
    • #7
    • 17th Apr 08, 9:06 AM
    You might find something useful in one of the links here.
    May all your dots fall silently to the ground.
    • Seakay
    • By Seakay 17th Apr 08, 9:13 AM
    • 4,173 Posts
    • 10,055 Thanks
    Seakay
    • #8
    • 17th Apr 08, 9:13 AM
    • #8
    • 17th Apr 08, 9:13 AM
    thanks seakay. I will try this method too.

    How long does the frothing take? a couple of minutes or 10/15?

    However, if the froth doesn't happen, can I just carry on and use it?
    Originally posted by JennyW
    depending on how warm your room tempereature is, anything from 10 minutes to half an hour; I usually use it after 15 minutes or when I'm ready because you don't need it really frothy for it to work in the dough.
  • JennyW
    • #9
    • 17th Apr 08, 9:27 AM
    • #9
    • 17th Apr 08, 9:27 AM
    depending on how warm your room tempereature is, anything from 10 minutes to half an hour; I usually use it after 15 minutes or when I'm ready because you don't need it really frothy for it to work in the dough.
    Originally posted by Seakay
    oh blimey. Didn't realise it could take that long. After 15 minutes I started up the computer and tried to find some answers but couldn't so just used the liquid as it was, however it turned out just fine but I will try the paste method next time
    • otterspasm
    • By otterspasm 17th Apr 08, 9:33 AM
    • 340 Posts
    • 516 Thanks
    otterspasm
    Hi all,
    I use fresh yeast often and never get a good head of froth like you do with dried yeast. As long as I can see some bubbles in it and it fizzes a bit when I shake the jug I don't worry too much. It still seems to make good bread.
    Tess x

    Underground, overground, wombling free...
    Old Style weight loss so far...2 stone and 7 pounds
    • squeaky
    • By squeaky 17th Apr 08, 9:35 AM
    • 13,808 Posts
    • 15,843 Thanks
    squeaky
    Aye, it depends on your water temperature; and room temperature too, since that affects how fast the water cools down.

    The other thing is, if you put the yeast in the full amount of water it's not likely to froth much. Next time just use between ¼ and ½ a cup (60-120 mls) of water and you are more likely to see a good head of froth.

    Don't forget to add the REST of the water when you're making up your loaf!
    Hi, I'm a Board Guide on the Old Style and the Consumer Rights boards which means I'm a volunteer to help the boards run smoothly and can move and merge posts there. Board guides are not moderators and don't read every post. If you spot an inappropriate or illegal post then please report it to forumteam@moneysavingexpert.com. It is not part of my role to deal with reportable posts. Any views are mine and are not the official line of MoneySavingExpert.

    Never ascribe to malice that which is adequately explained by incompetence.
    DTFAC: Y.T.D = 5.20 Apr 0.50
    • Biggles
    • By Biggles 17th Apr 08, 9:58 AM
    • 7,611 Posts
    • 5,016 Thanks
    Biggles
    so is yours now fizzing up? Just wondering what I'm doing wrong
    Originally posted by JennyW
    No, it just bubbles away like yours does. Or are you saying yours stops bubbling altogether? If you look down into it and you see regular bubbles coming up to the top, then that seems to be it. Not quite so satisfying as a nice 1-inch head on top as with dried yeast but, as you have found out, it does the job.
  • JennyW
    No, it just bubbles away like yours does. Or are you saying yours stops bubbling altogether? If you look down into it and you see regular bubbles coming up to the top, then that seems to be it. Not quite so satisfying as a nice 1-inch head on top as with dried yeast but, as you have found out, it does the job.
    Originally posted by Biggles
    yes sorry, just a few bubbles rose up, certainly not the frothy head some seem to get I was really looking forward to seeing that (expecting to see something like the head on a glass of guiness ). But yes, the few bubbles that were in mine seemed to do the job
    • dawnylou
    • By dawnylou 5th May 08, 1:51 PM
    • 3,105 Posts
    • 51,501 Thanks
    dawnylou
    My bread always seems a bit stodgy and doesn't seem to rise half as nuch as I would like....any ideas why?
    I follow the recipe on the back of the bread flour packet to a tee....
    Dream of being mortgage free....
    APR 2007 - 109,825 FEB 2012 - 98,664.53


  • count rostov
    Ha ha - I thought that fresh yeast wasn't meant to froth at all! I just mix it with sugar and warm water and add to the flour. The bread is still nice!
    My question is, how do you know when the yeast is past it's best? I had some which was about a week and a half old and wasn't sure whether to risk it. Elizabeth David says that in the past they put the fresh yeast in warm sugared water and if it sank and then floated within about two minutes it was good to use. Then she says that you should be able to tell by sight and smell whether it is good or not. But then she doesn't tell you what it should look/smell like!
    Anyway, mine didn't float so I threw it out and used dried yeast instead. The bread was fine.
    Debt at LBM (20th March 2008) 13,607
    Debt currently 11,667 11088 10,681 10354 Hurrah 24% paid off
    Oh dear ... back to 12944 9% paid off :rolleyes:
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  • Boudica
    Hi there

    I feel that this may be a stupid question but I need to ask it anyway.

    I've always made bread with dried yeast but I am going to start getting the fresh from the bakery dept.

    How much fresh yeast do you use please to make a bog standard sized loaf?

    Sorry for thick-sounding question....i'm starting my moneysaving again in earnest this week....i've taken my eye off the ball so need to start again

    Thanks
    • Pink.
    • By Pink. 25th May 08, 6:03 PM
    • 17,431 Posts
    • 40,365 Thanks
    Pink.
    Hi Boudica,

    I have never used fresh yeast, but the replies on this thread may help:

    fresh yeast dried yeast conversion

    Pink
  • JennyW
    Homemade bread and indigestion
    Has anyone suffered with indigestion since making their own bread :confused:

    I only ask because both my husband and I have suffered with this since I bought my panny a couple of months back.

    Could be purely coincidental but I'm using shop bread at the moment just to see.

    Blooming hope not coz I love my home-made bread. Plus if my bread is additive and preservative free, cant see why it would cause problems? Could it be a particular brand of flour. Would be interested to hear if anyone has had problems.
    • recovering spendaholic
    • By recovering spendaholic 4th Jun 08, 10:30 AM
    • 3,049 Posts
    • 15,426 Thanks
    recovering spendaholic
    I find I get indigestion if I eat any kind of bread that is hot out of the oven, or too fresh. I also get bad indigestion if I eat value bread or bread made with value flour. I have no idea why but my friend is just the same and we reckon that it is our age (40's) - when I was younger I had a cast iron stomach and could eat anything!
    Jane

    ENDIS. Employed, no disposable income or savings!
    • Andy Hamilton
    • By Andy Hamilton 4th Jun 08, 11:34 AM
    • 650 Posts
    • 577 Thanks
    Andy Hamilton
    I can be ill if I have bread on the rapid bake setting, don't know why that is?

    If your making bread with a lot of fibre in (wholemeal etc) then the fibre absorbs water more readily leaving you with slightly more acidic stomach, hence indegestion.

    Best cure for indegestion is to not let yourself become dehydrated.
    Lets get this straight. Say my house is worth 100K, it drops 20K and I complain but I should not complain when I actually pay 200K via a mortgage:rolleyes:
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