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    • MothballsWallet
    • By MothballsWallet 2nd Jan 08, 7:04 PM
    • 12,687 Posts
    • 17,240 Thanks
    MothballsWallet
    • #2
    • 2nd Jan 08, 7:04 PM
    • #2
    • 2nd Jan 08, 7:04 PM
    I'm not sure about this - the thing is, are we talking about a pint per donation session (which is what the National Blood Service here will allow)? Let's assume, for the sake of argument, 100 quid paid for 1 pint of blood.

    The next question is: how badly in debt is our Britney? You see, she could be tempted to sell more than 1 pint at a time as that would pay more money so help her with her debts, but the problem is that women's bodies carry about 5 pints of blood, IIRC, where men's bodies carry about 7.

    I think that the reason why blood donors can't give more than 1 pint at a time is to allow their bodies to safely (this being the operative word here) replace that blood by natural regeneration (I think it takes about a week for a donor's system to replace the donated pint).

    Okay, so my biology's not very good, but I do remember there's different volumes of blood carried by men and women.
    Always ask yourself one question: What would Gibbs do?
    I live in the UK City of Culture 2021
    I had to put mothballs in my wallet - the moths had learned the PINs to my cards...
    • Contains Mild Peril
    • By Contains Mild Peril 2nd Jan 08, 8:48 PM
    • 4,058 Posts
    • 2,830 Thanks
    Contains Mild Peril
    • #3
    • 2nd Jan 08, 8:48 PM
    • #3
    • 2nd Jan 08, 8:48 PM
    I don't think it would be legal for an organisation to take more than a pint of blood from one person within a set time frame. With the normal Blood Tranfusion Service, the minimum time to wait between donations is 16 weeks, so if Britney feels bad about missing one of her regular sessions, she can donate a little more frequently in future to make up for it.
    If I were in her position though, I'd want to find out some basic informatrion about the research centre before going ahead.
    • MothballsWallet
    • By MothballsWallet 2nd Jan 08, 8:59 PM
    • 12,687 Posts
    • 17,240 Thanks
    MothballsWallet
    • #4
    • 2nd Jan 08, 8:59 PM
    • #4
    • 2nd Jan 08, 8:59 PM
    I don't think it would be legal for an organisation to take more than a pint of blood from one person within a set time frame. With the normal Blood Tranfusion Service, the minimum time to wait between donations is 16 weeks, so if Britney feels bad about missing one of her regular sessions, she can donate a little more frequently in future to make up for it.
    If I were in her position though, I'd want to find out some basic informatrion about the research centre before going ahead.
    Originally posted by Contains Mild Peril
    I see where you're coming from - however, we don't know much about this research firm from the original dilemma: they may be 100% law-abiding, or they might be a bit Arthur Daley-esque.

    A company can obey just enough laws to make sure that Government and Police don't pay you too close attention, but be breaking other laws under the counter, so to speak. It just depends on how many 0's are in the budget for your legal team...
    Always ask yourself one question: What would Gibbs do?
    I live in the UK City of Culture 2021
    I had to put mothballs in my wallet - the moths had learned the PINs to my cards...
    • phoebe03cat
    • By phoebe03cat 3rd Jan 08, 8:52 AM
    • 868 Posts
    • 837 Thanks
    phoebe03cat
    • #5
    • 3rd Jan 08, 8:52 AM
    • #5
    • 3rd Jan 08, 8:52 AM
    No, give it all up and go bankrupt. She's probably in no fit state to give blood anyway. Sure with divorce and business loss doctor could deem her medically unfit to work . Give blood for free and keep self respect. Recoup and start fresh. What's the motivation to take on three jobs and sell blood in this benefit riddled country anyway; or maybe she's a white middle class worker, paid through the nose all her life and not entitled to any?
    • saving_junky
    • By saving_junky 3rd Jan 08, 9:22 AM
    • 14 Posts
    • 9 Thanks
    saving_junky
    • #6
    • 3rd Jan 08, 9:22 AM
    • #6
    • 3rd Jan 08, 9:22 AM
    So long as she doesn't do anything that causes her health risks, then absolutely she would be very justified in selling her blood. As there is a market for it, that means that she is effectively contributing to charity by donating her blood for free to the donation service. She is in problems with money, and to my mind, if you don't have enough money to keep your head above water, then number one, stop paying to charity, and number two find ways to increase your income. Full Stop end of.

    If when she's out of debt she wishes to start donating again, that's her choice. If however she feels that she'd rather continue to earn money for her blood that's also her choice.

    There are many ways that people can give up some of their earning power to give to charity, for example people who work part-time but do voluntary work in the hours that they've given up, and by continueing to dontate rather than make money from it, she would be giving up part of her earning power to charity.
    • andybuchan
    • By andybuchan 3rd Jan 08, 10:13 AM
    • 4 Posts
    • 6 Thanks
    andybuchan
    • #7
    • 3rd Jan 08, 10:13 AM
    Blood donation or sale.
    • #7
    • 3rd Jan 08, 10:13 AM
    Perhaps the problem would be solved if blood transfusions were only given free to those that make donations during the year. If you needed a blood transfusion and had not donated then perhaps you could be charged 100 per pint you accept. This could then be paid to the people that had donated the blood in the first place as all blood donations are now well recorded.

    As to her selling her blood I suppose the same argument applies to the abortion dilema - its your body and your choice many would say. Others would say that it belongs to a higher authority and you have no such right and that you instead have a greater duty to mankind and should give freely of your blood for the greater good.

    Same arguement could of course apply to organ donation - gets very complicated me thinks..........................
    • olly300
    • By olly300 3rd Jan 08, 10:26 AM
    • 14,312 Posts
    • 13,632 Thanks
    olly300
    • #8
    • 3rd Jan 08, 10:26 AM
    • #8
    • 3rd Jan 08, 10:26 AM
    One of the major issues for me is why does she donate blood free in the first place. Most of the people I know who donate blood have had relations who have needed lots of care and it's a way of saying thanks. If she has no special reason for donating blood then she should go and get paid for it.

    However knowing different people who have been volunteers for medical research the ones who where in debt or needed the money to live on, being a guinea pig didn't help their situation in the long-term. Britney is better of going to the debt-free wannabee board for support and contacting an organisation like the National Debt Helpline for a long-term plan.
    • olly300
    • By olly300 3rd Jan 08, 10:33 AM
    • 14,312 Posts
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    olly300
    • #9
    • 3rd Jan 08, 10:33 AM
    • #9
    • 3rd Jan 08, 10:33 AM
    Perhaps the problem would be solved if blood transfusions were only given free to those that make donations during the year. If you needed a blood transfusion and had not donated then perhaps you could be charged 100 per pint you accept. This could then be paid to the people that had donated the blood in the first place as all blood donations are now well recorded.
    Originally posted by andybuchan
    As a blood donor I don't agree with this.

    I know people who can't give blood for different reasons - this includings fainting when trying to donate, medical conditions and simply not being heavy enough.
    • saving_junky
    • By saving_junky 3rd Jan 08, 10:35 AM
    • 14 Posts
    • 9 Thanks
    saving_junky

    However knowing different people who have been volunteers for medical research the ones who where in debt or needed the money to live on, being a guinea pig didn't help their situation in the long-term. Britney is better of going to the debt-free wannabee board for support and contacting an organisation like the National Debt Helpline for a long-term plan.
    Originally posted by olly300
    Yeh but surely finding ways of maximising income for minimum hassle and inconvenience can be a very positive part of the process of changing attitudes and moving towards being a money saving junky rather than a money spending junky....... of course there are lots of other things she could do in addition, but why turn away the chance of some easy cash, when she's in debt and needs it.......?? :confused:
  • harryhound
    No, give it all up and go bankrupt.
    Originally posted by phoebe03cat
    Somehow, from personal experience, I don't think many of the creditors, who probably include friends and family, will think bankruptcy is the morally superior choice?

    Can we assume that this blood is going to be used as a lab ingredient, that is why the company is having to buy it; and not pumped into a living patient? I'm thinking of the role that buying blood from people (druggies?) with nothing left to loose; has played in HIV, hepatitis etc. I think we should be proud of the donor culture we still have in the UK, where do you draw the line: Bone marrow? Kidneys? Surrogate Pregnancy?

    Tread carefully, should a rich George Best type character be able to jump the Q & buy a kidney?

    Are our bodies our property to do with as we see fit?

    As a very occasional blood donor, I would NOT volunteer to give this healthy young daughter of mine the money to stop her selling a pint or two, if she sees that as the thing to do. So why do I draw the line at flogging off a kidney?

    Harry.
    • Bargainetta
    • By Bargainetta 3rd Jan 08, 11:18 AM
    • 77 Posts
    • 34 Thanks
    Bargainetta
    Donating Blood
    I'd say yes. No problem. I had a boss who sold his blood during his hippie days in order to get home from Morocco when the money run out. As a woman, though, I would say she may possibly need to consider iron + vitamin C supplements if she notices, for instance, her scalp becoming flakey. That can be a sign of low iron reserves. I always find even relatively cheap ones like those from Superdrug do the trick.
    • barvid
    • By barvid 3rd Jan 08, 12:33 PM
    • 400 Posts
    • 251 Thanks
    barvid
    As a blood donor I don't agree with this.

    I know people who can't give blood for different reasons - this includings fainting when trying to donate, medical conditions and simply not being heavy enough.
    Originally posted by olly300
    Also worth bearing in mind that some people are prevented from giving blood, e.g. those who have conditions which require daily medical (epilepsy being a good example). The constant presence of drugs in their blood can mean that they cannot be donors.
  • phyllis13
    I have regularly donated blood for the last 30 years, but there has been the odd occasion when the NBS have refused to bleed me. It's for the donor's protection so I happily accept it.

    However, I once saw an ad in a London paper that said a clinic would pay 65 for a donation. Having been declined a few weeks previously by the NBS I thought I'd give it a go. I didn't 'need' the money but, at that time, I decided that if the NBS didn't 'want' my blood, I'd give it to soembody that did and make a bit of cash to boot.

    I've only done it on the one occasion and the procedure lasted a lot longer than my usual, and I'd only consider doing it again in similar circumstances.
  • pywackit
    Money moral dilema. should Britany sell her blood
    If she takes on three jobs she won't be in any fit state to give, or sell, her blood.
    Far better to sell it until she gets back on her feet, sticks to her morals by paying off her debts (after all someone looses out somewhere if she doesn't) and goes back to donating blood once she can afford to do so.
    Hopefully the research that is carried out on her 'sold' blood will also eventualy help others.
    • mossy
    • By mossy 3rd Jan 08, 1:39 PM
    • 1,140 Posts
    • 8,192 Thanks
    mossy
    I'd say absolutely yes....then once her debts are sorted she can start donating blood through the blood donor service as she previously did. The scenario implies she's trying hard to get out of debt and selling her blood would be a good opportunity for her raise funds seeings as she's tried ohter fund raising things already...she wouldn't be selling her blood to be money grabbing and greedy she would only be doing it to sort out her financial situation.
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  • IainCMartin
    Where do I sign up to be paid ?
    • bumblesquat
    • By bumblesquat 3rd Jan 08, 3:30 PM
    • 203 Posts
    • 1,055 Thanks
    bumblesquat
    If she's struggling with money and there's an offer of payment if she gives the same amount of blood as she would normally, then why shouldn't she do it.

    It's a shame that the Blood Donor Service isn't getting it but she's in need and she's done a good thing giving blood to them already, I'm sure the offer of being paid would only be a limited one so she should take it while it's available and the Blood Donor Service can have some more when she's back on her feet.
    • tiamai_d
    • By tiamai_d 3rd Jan 08, 3:34 PM
    • 11,878 Posts
    • 71,135 Thanks
    tiamai_d
    Perhaps the problem would be solved if blood transfusions were only given free to those that make donations during the year. If you needed a blood transfusion and had not donated then perhaps you could be charged 100 per pint you accept. This could then be paid to the people that had donated the blood in the first place as all blood donations are now well recorded.
    Originally posted by andybuchan
    Well then, I'd be 900 in debt because I needed blood after having my son and had never been allowed to donate blood prior to that because I also had blood when I was a baby.

    If I were given the chance to 'sell' blood, and I needed money to pay off debts, then I would.
  • barri
    Somehow, from personal experience, I don't think many of the creditors, who probably include friends and family, will think bankruptcy is the morally superior choice?

    Can we assume that this blood is going to be used as a lab ingredient, that is why the company is having to buy it; and not pumped into a living patient? I'm thinking of the role that buying blood from people (druggies?) with nothing left to loose; has played in HIV, hepatitis etc. I think we should be proud of the donor culture we still have in the UK, where do you draw the line: Bone marrow? Kidneys? Surrogate Pregnancy?

    Tread carefully, should a rich George Best type character be able to jump the Q & buy a kidney?

    Are our bodies our property to do with as we see fit?

    As a very occasional blood donor, I would NOT volunteer to give this healthy young daughter of mine the money to stop her selling a pint or two, if she sees that as the thing to do. So why do I draw the line at flogging off a kidney?

    Harry.
    Originally posted by harryhound
    Going bankrupt is immoral, unless you are forced to it. Also, old people are not allowed to donate blood; I'm not sure of the cut-off age but I'mm 77 and too old. Barri.
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