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  • FIRST POST
    • Monoloco
    • By Monoloco 15th Jan 20, 2:42 PM
    • 3Posts
    • 0Thanks
    Monoloco
    Expected correspondence
    • #1
    • 15th Jan 20, 2:42 PM
    Expected correspondence 15th Jan 20 at 2:42 PM
    Good afternoon,



    i have a question regarding the expected/obligated correspondence from your energy provider. My partner and I moved into a new build house approximately 12 months ago. I realise it was our error, but in all the moving, setting everything up (first time buyers etc) I neglected to confirm who the energy provider was.


    Nothing was heard at all for the initial 12 month until we were landed with a bill, totalling over 1200 for the 12 months we had been here.



    Whilst we don't dispute the bill, nor our own faults, surely there is some sort of obligation by an energy company to contact you throughout the annual period?



    I'd have expected an initial introduction, nothing received, or at least a quarterly update on the current charges.



    Is this something that should have happened or are providers under no obligation to contact you until a bill is actually due, in this case 12 months later?



    Again, we recognise the fault on our part, however thought that some kind of correspondence should have taken place.


    Many thanks in advance.


    ML
Page 1
    • RelievedSheff
    • By RelievedSheff 15th Jan 20, 2:51 PM
    • 1,059 Posts
    • 1,107 Thanks
    RelievedSheff
    • #2
    • 15th Jan 20, 2:51 PM
    • #2
    • 15th Jan 20, 2:51 PM
    Surely in the 12 months you realised you should be paying for gas and electric?

    You have tried it on and now been landed with the bill.

    Get it paid. You have used the energy you will have to pay for it.
    • JJ Egan
    • By JJ Egan 15th Jan 20, 3:07 PM
    • 13,653 Posts
    • 6,287 Thanks
    JJ Egan
    • #3
    • 15th Jan 20, 3:07 PM
    • #3
    • 15th Jan 20, 3:07 PM
    How would they know you had moved in ??
    How would they know who you are .
    You moved in are in a deemed contract with the existing supplier on standard rate .
    You register with them give meter readings and then are free to change supplier .
    • Gerry1
    • By Gerry1 15th Jan 20, 3:10 PM
    • 1,230 Posts
    • 787 Thanks
    Gerry1
    • #4
    • 15th Jan 20, 3:10 PM
    • #4
    • 15th Jan 20, 3:10 PM
    I neglected to confirm who the energy provider was.
    Originally posted by Monoloco
    Upon completion, did the housebuilder not end their contract with the energy company, take the final meter reading and provide you with all the details?
    • Smodlet
    • By Smodlet 15th Jan 20, 3:12 PM
    • 5,148 Posts
    • 8,616 Thanks
    Smodlet
    • #5
    • 15th Jan 20, 3:12 PM
    • #5
    • 15th Jan 20, 3:12 PM
    Surely in the 12 months you realised you should be paying for gas and electric?

    You have tried it on and now been landed with the bill.

    Get it paid. You have used the energy you will have to pay for it.
    Originally posted by RelievedSheff
    As above: Energy is not free; surely you knew that before you moved in and if not, you should have. If you know you should be paying for a service and are not, why on earth would you not take steps to find out to whom you should be paying the bill and how much it is before you rack up a year's worth of debt? The responsibility for paying bills, finding out who the supplier is and switching if desired rests entirely with the homeowner, not with the supplier.

    Check out the Cheap Energy Club/other comparison sites if you want to save money on energy costs but pay for what you have used or risk detriment to your credit records; energy accounts form part of these.
    Last edited by Smodlet; 15-01-2020 at 3:14 PM.
    What is this life if, sweet wordsmith, we have no time to take the pith?
    Every stew starts with the first onion.
    I took it upon myself to investigate a trifle; it had custard, jelly, soggy sponge things...
    • Monoloco
    • By Monoloco 16th Jan 20, 2:24 PM
    • 3 Posts
    • 0 Thanks
    Monoloco
    • #6
    • 16th Jan 20, 2:24 PM
    • #6
    • 16th Jan 20, 2:24 PM
    Thank you for those helpful replies.

    I apologise, I thought I my inital post was clear enough. I did not 'try it on', nor did we believe the energy was free.

    Nothing was heard from the building company nor the energy firm.

    As stated above, I completely acknowledge the fault on my part, that is not in dispute.

    The question was should we have expected correspondence from the supplier e.g. a quarterly or half yearly bill/letter stating the current balance not if we owed the balance.

    It was merely a question over the process of billing and if an interim letter should have been expected.

    Many thanks to the less assumptive replies.

    ML
    • brewerdave
    • By brewerdave 16th Jan 20, 2:41 PM
    • 5,821 Posts
    • 2,627 Thanks
    brewerdave
    • #7
    • 16th Jan 20, 2:41 PM
    • #7
    • 16th Jan 20, 2:41 PM
    The builder should have supplied the changover readings on the day you completed and should have informed the Utility Company of the new householder. Obviously they didn't. It's one of the things I would expect your solicitor to have pointed out!
    If you haven't received anything at all, (eg letter addressed to the Occupier) I suspect that the builder/agents were receiving the bills and have only just got round to sorting their end out - to be honest, they MAY have tried to sort out months ago, but Utility Cos. are not the most helpful in these sorts of cases, particularly if there were a number of properties involved.
    Best bet is to approach the Company with a view to paying off the debt over at least 12 months, having first checked that the usage they have used to bill, looks reasonably accurate. You may have to do some readings of your own to check.
    • Talldave
    • By Talldave 16th Jan 20, 3:01 PM
    • 635 Posts
    • 382 Thanks
    Talldave
    • #8
    • 16th Jan 20, 3:01 PM
    • #8
    • 16th Jan 20, 3:01 PM
    If the builder didn't tell them that they had "moved out" and you didn't tell them that you had moved in, then they had no reason to communicate. The billing address for the builder's account was undoubtedly not the house itself so you wouldn't even have seen any bills arriving addressed to the builder.

    So the answer is "no". You and the builder are in theory equally to blame, but the builder deals with lots of houses and you only had one to deal with, so as you've accepted, it's your fault. But you're wiser and it won't happen again!
    • Smodlet
    • By Smodlet 16th Jan 20, 3:31 PM
    • 5,148 Posts
    • 8,616 Thanks
    Smodlet
    • #9
    • 16th Jan 20, 3:31 PM
    • #9
    • 16th Jan 20, 3:31 PM
    It does seem to be some kind of modern, first world plague, this inclination to blame anyone but oneself; it is hardly confined to energy customers.

    If you take the view that, if in doubt, it is always your responsibility/fault/problem, you will seldom go wrong, OP. Such is life. That was a general rant and not aimed at you specifically.
    Last edited by Smodlet; 16-01-2020 at 5:10 PM.
    What is this life if, sweet wordsmith, we have no time to take the pith?
    Every stew starts with the first onion.
    I took it upon myself to investigate a trifle; it had custard, jelly, soggy sponge things...
    • Monoloco
    • By Monoloco 16th Jan 20, 3:59 PM
    • 3 Posts
    • 0 Thanks
    Monoloco
    Again, thank you for those helpful replies.
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