Your browser isn't supported
It looks like you're using an old web browser. To get the most out of the site and to ensure guides display correctly, we suggest upgrading your browser now. Download the latest:

Welcome to the MSE Forums

We're home to a fantastic community of MoneySavers but anyone can post. Please exercise caution & report spam, illegal, offensive or libellous posts/messages: click "report" or email forumteam@.

Search
  • FIRST POST
    • robertboyd
    • By robertboyd 14th Jun 19, 11:09 AM
    • 15Posts
    • 6Thanks
    robertboyd
    Noise Reduction in Terraced House?
    • #1
    • 14th Jun 19, 11:09 AM
    Noise Reduction in Terraced House? 14th Jun 19 at 11:09 AM
    Hello all,

    I just had a baby recently and really enjoy the pleasure of being a parent. There was tough moments and also the joy of seeing the baby grow up.
    However, I recently received a courteous and kind note from our next door neighbor that baby crying in unsociable hours (1.30 am - 3.30 am) sometimes makes him unable to go back to sleep and hence affects his work the next day (he has to wake up early everyday for work). We live in a terraced house and so the walls between our houses are probably quite thin.

    Although he said that it is not a tremendous disturbance, we still feel very bad for interfering our neighbor, so now we need to find a way to reduce noise. I looked online and found that soundproofing the walls by sticking sound-dampening materials like acoustic foam, or sponge is the most suitable solution for our situation.

    Just before I storm out and purchase a lot of foam/sponge, I would just like to know if any of the members here has tried this before and whether it works or not? Does the foam absorb the sound well? Or doesn't do anything at all? There are mixed reviews about it everywhere I looked
Page 2
    • BelowTheLine
    • By BelowTheLine 14th Jun 19, 3:42 PM
    • 55 Posts
    • 41 Thanks
    BelowTheLine
    Right off the bat, congratulations on the baby, you are a saint and it's really nice of you to find the bandwidth to worry about about your neighbour while being a sleep-deprived new parent with a newborn at home.

    Having had two of these monsters myself, I can tell you that until they're a year old, their sleep and crying patterns can vary wildly from month to month or sometimes even week to week. They could be waking up every two hours this week and sleep through the night the next. They're very sensitive to pretty much everything so sometimes its hard to tell why.

    So before you go away and spend a lot of money/time/effort on "soundproofing" or anything to stop the sound of a baby crying, remember the above. And the evolutionary fact that a baby's cry is designed to drill through anything

    Honestly, it'll pass. I fully empathise with the inconvenience experienced by your neighbour, but it's only temporary.

    I just had
    a baby recently and really enjoy the pleasure of being a parent. There was tough moments and also the joy of seeing the baby grow up.
    However, I recently received a courteous and kind note from our next door neighbor that baby crying in unsociable hours (1.30 am - 3.30 am) sometimes makes him unable to go back to sleep and hence affects his work the next day (he has to wake up early everyday for work). We live in a terraced house and so the walls between our houses are probably quite thin.
    Originally posted by robertboyd
    • Sapphire
    • By Sapphire 14th Jun 19, 3:54 PM
    • 3,082 Posts
    • 7,032 Thanks
    Sapphire
    He could try earplugs.

    It's a baby, not a dog, nor loud drum 'n' bass at 3am.

    I think you're being more than accommodating.

    One thing, is the baby next to the adjoining wall? Is there another room/wall you could move the cot (or whatever) to?

    Is your baby literally crying for two hours every night, or a short time at some stage during those hours?
    Originally posted by hazyjo
    I once owned a flat that was reasonably quiet for years. However, someone moved in in the flat next door and put a small adopted child that cried very loudly for hours at night in the adjoining room. It was truly terrible torture, and the bawling sounded as if it was in my room. I ended up sleeping in the conservatory (where I could still hear the noise). The room was too small to enable any form of soundproofing to be installed. I moved out quite quickly from that place, and still have nightmares about it.
    Last edited by Sapphire; 14-06-2019 at 3:59 PM.
    • Smodlet
    • By Smodlet 14th Jun 19, 5:06 PM
    • 4,890 Posts
    • 8,303 Thanks
    Smodlet
    Neighbour did have a choice, they choose a terraced house! !!!!ing stupid !!!!
    Originally posted by Marvel1
    It must be so nice to have the money and, therefore, the choice to buy a large, detached house rather than a terraced or semi-detached... Would we all had such options, oh, wait! Once upon a time, I did. Then I didn't.

    Grow up!
    Last edited by Smodlet; 15-06-2019 at 2:24 PM.
    What is this life if, sweet wordsmith, we have no time to take the pith?
    Every stew starts with the first onion.
    I took it upon myself to investigate a trifle; it had custard, jelly, soggy sponge things...
    • charlie792
    • By charlie792 14th Jun 19, 6:00 PM
    • 1,698 Posts
    • 5,390 Thanks
    charlie792
    just to throw my hat into the ring, depending on the room layout (ie no radiator or sockets/switches) on the adjoining wall it is possible to make an acoustic wall. Basically it's a second skin, with acoustic insulation, and acoustic plasterboard - in effect a stud wall on the actual wall. Lost about 3-4 inches in room size.
    it cost us about £500 but it is quite a lot of effort DIY and with a baby maybe not most practical.
    We did it to keep the noise of our neighbour out (he was deaf as a post bless him) and his TV was a nightmare.
    Last edited by charlie792; 14-06-2019 at 6:05 PM.
    MFW 2019 #111 £16,729.81/ £15,000
    Offset Balance £32,163.51/ £79,830.23

    Aug 2014 £114,750 -35 yrs (2049)
    Sept 2016 £104,800
    Nov 2018 £82,500 -24 yrs (2042)

    Aim Mortgage Free by June 2023 (26 yrs off original term) January 2022
    • Ms Chocaholic
    • By Ms Chocaholic 14th Jun 19, 6:08 PM
    • 10,559 Posts
    • 64,353 Thanks
    Ms Chocaholic
    Is there any way you can stop the crying, rocking the baby, soothing the baby, two hours non stop crying in the middle of the night sounds distressing for your little one and how do you both manage to work the following day if you are kept awake.
    Thrifty Till 50 Then Spend Till The End

    You can please some of the people some of the time, all of the people some of the time, some of the people all of the time but you can never please all of the people all of the time
    • jamesperrett
    • By jamesperrett 15th Jun 19, 12:19 AM
    • 890 Posts
    • 527 Thanks
    jamesperrett
    just to throw my hat into the ring, depending on the room layout (ie no radiator or sockets/switches) on the adjoining wall it is possible to make an acoustic wall. Basically it's a second skin, with acoustic insulation, and acoustic plasterboard - in effect a stud wall on the actual wall. Lost about 3-4 inches in room size.
    it cost us about £500 but it is quite a lot of effort DIY and with a baby maybe not most practical.
    Originally posted by charlie792
    Yes - this is the only way to do it but you need to be extremely careful with the wall design. The new wall shouldn't be attached to the existing wall and should use some kind of flexible strip all around to prevent vibrations from being transmitted to the existing structure. Multiple layers of different thickness plasterboard are better than one layer. Most builders don't understand soundproofing (although they may think the do) so, if getting someone in to do this, you need to find a specialist.
    • london.cidade
    • By london.cidade 15th Jun 19, 12:37 AM
    • 117 Posts
    • 17 Thanks
    london.cidade
    earplug doesn't work,

    there are two options, either you or your neighbour should have a soundproof bedroom. Just check music studios` suppliers, it used to be quite expensive, nowadays a bit cheaper.

    i went to boarding school for 6 years, since then I am very sensitive to the noises also have insomnia that`s why i bought a semi-detached home.
    • AndyMT
    • By AndyMT 15th Jun 19, 1:53 AM
    • 25 Posts
    • 54 Thanks
    AndyMT
    I've bought earplugs, they don't completely block the noise but have helped.
    try white noise - more effective. buy a cheap bluetooth speaker, connect to your phone/tablet, download an app .. and ZzzzzzZzzzzzZzzzzz
    • Murphybear
    • By Murphybear 15th Jun 19, 3:51 AM
    • 4,912 Posts
    • 9,289 Thanks
    Murphybear
    Neighbour did have a choice, they choose a terraced house! !!!!ing stupid !!!!
    Originally posted by Marvel1
    That is an unkind comment. Iím sure most people would not choose a terraced house if they could afford a nice detached one.
    • warby68
    • By warby68 15th Jun 19, 4:11 AM
    • 1,372 Posts
    • 10,913 Thanks
    warby68
    Having the baby right up against the adjoining wall seems like the thing that should be altered. A little distance should at least take the edge off the noise, as heard from next door.

    OP, its hard to believe there isn't anywhere else at all the baby can be, at least during these phases, even if you have an uncomfortable furniture arrangement or something for a bit.

    Right up against their wall does seem a bit off.

    I had poor sleepers and settlers x 2 but not the continual crying.- I have driven and walked for hours during the night, actually to let OH sleep for work as in our case we were detached. Hope you get the support you need. 2 hours solid does suggest you might need to try something different but without knowing more, it might be best just to suggest you chat to your local support for ideas. Its easy to get fixated on doing things a certain way when you're in the young baby fog and it can take a third party shove to change it up.

    Sound proofing seems extreme for what should be a short phase.
    • MoneySeeker1
    • By MoneySeeker1 15th Jun 19, 6:08 AM
    • 130 Posts
    • 237 Thanks
    MoneySeeker1
    If not on a permanent basis, could you not just move the baby to another room, maybe temporarily? The hallway even? Lounge? In bed with you?

    Maybe I'm feeling his pain if 2 hours solid
    Originally posted by hazyjo
    Agreed.

    Presumably you have one of those carry-around type cots? - whether from a fold-up "lie the baby flat" type pram or one of those Moses baskets things.

    So put the baby in that to sleep at night, rather than their cot, and take the carrycot into the sitting room or somewhere if (when) they start crying.

    There will be floorspace somewhere in the house the carrycot could go - whether it's sitting room, kitchen, your own bedroom, etc.
    • ruperts
    • By ruperts 15th Jun 19, 6:34 AM
    • 2,456 Posts
    • 4,808 Thanks
    ruperts
    To soundproof properly you have to build a room within a room to allow for a cavity. Expensive and takes up quite a bit of space, but if you've got the room and are willing/neighbour is willing to pay for it then that's the solution.

    But surely if this terrace has more than one bedroom the easiest solution is to move the baby to another room, even if only temporarily for a few months until the baby sleeps through better.

    In the meantime a response to the neighbour saying you understand their concerns and are looking at ways to address it. If the neighbour is reasonable I'd probably take the baby round and try and get them to bond. Somehow noise from people you know and like is much more bearable than noise from anonymous neighbours.
    • Catkei
    • By Catkei 15th Jun 19, 7:04 AM
    • 40 Posts
    • 34 Thanks
    Catkei
    Eh I would hate it if my neighbour brought their baby around to bond. I don't need to bond with a stranger's baby, thanks. What an odd thing to suggest.

    We live in a flat and our downstairs neighbours have a young child. When he was a baby there was a lot of crying. What annoyed me wasn't the crying per se, I mean, that's what babies do. It was the fact that she would never, ever move the baby out of the bedroom (all the flats are the same, so the bedrooms are all on top of eachother). It literally sounded like the baby was in our room. I never understood why she couldn't take the baby into the living room while he was crying. Instead we had to endure 2-3 hours of incessant crying every night of the week, and having to get up at 5.30am to go to work, it was not fun. So needless to say I feel for your neighbour. Could you not move the baby while he/she is crying downstairs? Our neighbours baby is older now, and we only really hear the odd late evening tantrum which is no problem, but if it's every night it'll grate on anyone's patience. Good luck, I can't imagine the crying is much fun for you either!
    • Norman Castle
    • By Norman Castle 15th Jun 19, 7:18 AM
    • 8,711 Posts
    • 7,578 Thanks
    Norman Castle
    Neighbour did have a choice, they choose a terraced house! !!!!ing stupid !!!!
    Originally posted by Marvel1
    Are you drunk?
    Don't harass a hippie. You'll get bad karma.

    Never trust a newbie with a rtb tale.
    • deannatrois
    • By deannatrois 15th Jun 19, 7:44 AM
    • 6,333 Posts
    • 8,924 Thanks
    deannatrois
    Off the top of my head, the white noise suggestion is a good one. If bottle fed, changing milk types might help. I was advised by fairly useless midwife to try camomile tea but 1st son hated it lol.

    I had two sons. First one hardly slept, second one did quite easily (not now he is 13 though). It was totally exhausting. You do find how little sleep a human being can get by on although I was a zombie for most of the first eight years. This was extreme though, most babies will settle down.

    To stop you getting too exhausted, I hope you have relatives who perhaps could take the occasional night shift, or allow you a break during the day. I managed to get the second one in a nursery for a few hours, that made all the difference.
    • Albala
    • By Albala 15th Jun 19, 7:57 AM
    • 285 Posts
    • 276 Thanks
    Albala
    My younger brother cried a lot, not just at at night, when a baby, neither I not an older sibling had. When parents, driven to despair after trying everything they could think of, tried to think of what was different, they recalled that the formula feed they were using was different (we were all formula fed throughout). They changed to the formula the two elder had had, and that was the end of the problem. It was weird, but they concluded that maybe he just felt hungry with the other one, or it slightly upset his tum, or something.

    There can be lots of reasons for crying babies, even something as odd as that, is there anyone you could ask for help and advice? It must be tiring for you, even leaving your neighbour out of it (with whom I sympathise, and I'm impressed that you care about him, as most parents these days seem to think that other people should suffer in silence when it comes to their offspring whatever the cause).
    Best wishes, and I hope things quieten down for you soon.
    • Albala
    • By Albala 15th Jun 19, 7:59 AM
    • 285 Posts
    • 276 Thanks
    Albala
    Off the top of my head, the white noise suggestion is a good one. If bottle fed, changing milk types might help. I was advised by fairly useless midwife to try camomile tea but 1st son hated it lol.

    I had two sons. First one hardly slept, second one did quite easily (not now he is 13 though). It was totally exhausting. You do find how little sleep a human being can get by on although I was a zombie for most of the first eight years. This was extreme though, most babies will settle down.

    To stop you getting too exhausted, I hope you have relatives who perhaps could take the occasional night shift, or allow you a break during the day. I managed to get the second one in a nursery for a few hours, that made all the difference.
    Originally posted by deannatrois
    Beat me to it!
    • ruperts
    • By ruperts 15th Jun 19, 8:48 AM
    • 2,456 Posts
    • 4,808 Thanks
    ruperts
    Eh I would hate it if my neighbour brought their baby around to bond. I don't need to bond with a stranger's baby, thanks. What an odd thing to suggest.
    Originally posted by Catkei
    Obviously you wouldn't turn up and demand the neighbour bonded with the baby. It would just be an introduction, so the neighbour could put a face to the noise, instead of it just being noise.

    I don't know, like I said, I've always found neighbour noise much easier to deal with if it's coming from people I know and like, rather than total strangers. Perhaps it's just me.
    • sheramber
    • By sheramber 15th Jun 19, 9:22 AM
    • 7,083 Posts
    • 5,339 Thanks
    sheramber
    My grandson cried for hours at night when a baby. Nothing consoled him.

    GP diagnosed acid reflux and prescribed medicine to add to his bottle- bliss!
    • Fire Fox
    • By Fire Fox 15th Jun 19, 10:22 AM
    • 25,157 Posts
    • 29,400 Thanks
    Fire Fox
    In the meantime a response to the neighbour saying you understand their concerns and are looking at ways to address it. If the neighbour is reasonable I'd probably take the baby round and try and get them to bond. Somehow noise from people you know and like is much more bearable than noise from anonymous neighbours.
    Originally posted by ruperts
    Obviously you wouldn't turn up and demand the neighbour bonded with the baby. It would just be an introduction, so the neighbour could put a face to the noise, instead of it just being noise.

    I don't know, like I said, I've always found neighbour noise much easier to deal with if it's coming from people I know and like, rather than total strangers. Perhaps it's me.
    Originally posted by ruperts
    Introducing yourself to your neighbours, or dropping them a note is great.

    But why would you inflict your baby on them? Should I introduce my cat to the neighbouring flats, so they can bond with her? Or would that be presumptuous?

    It is a generic baby not a person. It becomes a person once it has a personality. Babies of the same ethnicity look similar and sound similar. Their screaming has evolved to be annoying. Hence I feel for the parents of any baby that cries a lot. But I do not want to have to fake coo over it.

    A significant minority of people either don't like babies, or don't like most babies.
    Declutterbug-in-progress.⭐️⭐️⭐️ ⭐️⭐️
Welcome to our new Forum!

Our aim is to save you money quickly and easily. We hope you like it!

Forum Team Contact us

Live Stats

149Posts Today

1,230Users online

Martin's Twitter