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    • robertboyd
    • By robertboyd 14th Jun 19, 11:09 AM
    • 15Posts
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    robertboyd
    Noise Reduction in Terraced House?
    • #1
    • 14th Jun 19, 11:09 AM
    Noise Reduction in Terraced House? 14th Jun 19 at 11:09 AM
    Hello all,

    I just had a baby recently and really enjoy the pleasure of being a parent. There was tough moments and also the joy of seeing the baby grow up.
    However, I recently received a courteous and kind note from our next door neighbor that baby crying in unsociable hours (1.30 am - 3.30 am) sometimes makes him unable to go back to sleep and hence affects his work the next day (he has to wake up early everyday for work). We live in a terraced house and so the walls between our houses are probably quite thin.

    Although he said that it is not a tremendous disturbance, we still feel very bad for interfering our neighbor, so now we need to find a way to reduce noise. I looked online and found that soundproofing the walls by sticking sound-dampening materials like acoustic foam, or sponge is the most suitable solution for our situation.

    Just before I storm out and purchase a lot of foam/sponge, I would just like to know if any of the members here has tried this before and whether it works or not? Does the foam absorb the sound well? Or doesn't do anything at all? There are mixed reviews about it everywhere I looked
Page 1
    • hazyjo
    • By hazyjo 14th Jun 19, 11:18 AM
    • 12,313 Posts
    • 16,821 Thanks
    hazyjo
    • #2
    • 14th Jun 19, 11:18 AM
    • #2
    • 14th Jun 19, 11:18 AM
    He could try earplugs.

    It's a baby, not a dog, nor loud drum 'n' bass at 3am.

    I think you're being more than accommodating.

    One thing, is the baby next to the adjoining wall? Is there another room/wall you could move the cot (or whatever) to?

    Is your baby literally crying for two hours every night, or a short time at some stage during those hours?
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    • Wanderingpomm
    • By Wanderingpomm 14th Jun 19, 11:22 AM
    • 245 Posts
    • 232 Thanks
    Wanderingpomm
    • #3
    • 14th Jun 19, 11:22 AM
    • #3
    • 14th Jun 19, 11:22 AM
    Cork tiles might be a good option as you’ll be able to wallpaper over them so they just look like a normal walk
    • robertboyd
    • By robertboyd 14th Jun 19, 11:54 AM
    • 15 Posts
    • 6 Thanks
    robertboyd
    • #4
    • 14th Jun 19, 11:54 AM
    • #4
    • 14th Jun 19, 11:54 AM
    The baby is next to the adjoining wall and there is no other place we can move the cot, i have thought about it and we can't.

    And yes, he cries for like a straight 2 hours pretty much everyday
    • robertboyd
    • By robertboyd 14th Jun 19, 11:56 AM
    • 15 Posts
    • 6 Thanks
    robertboyd
    • #5
    • 14th Jun 19, 11:56 AM
    • #5
    • 14th Jun 19, 11:56 AM
    Cork tiles might be a good option as you’ll be able to wallpaper over them so they just look like a normal walk
    Originally posted by Wanderingpomm
    Have you tried it yourself?
    My research suggests that the cork tiles are not so great at absorbing sound
    • danlewi2
    • By danlewi2 14th Jun 19, 12:16 PM
    • 168 Posts
    • 180 Thanks
    danlewi2
    • #6
    • 14th Jun 19, 12:16 PM
    • #6
    • 14th Jun 19, 12:16 PM
    buy them some ear plugs and a bottle of wine.
    • hazyjo
    • By hazyjo 14th Jun 19, 12:36 PM
    • 12,313 Posts
    • 16,821 Thanks
    hazyjo
    • #7
    • 14th Jun 19, 12:36 PM
    • #7
    • 14th Jun 19, 12:36 PM
    The baby is next to the adjoining wall and there is no other place we can move the cot, i have thought about it and we can't.

    And yes, he cries for like a straight 2 hours pretty much everyday
    Originally posted by robertboyd
    If not on a permanent basis, could you not just move the baby to another room, maybe temporarily? The hallway even? Lounge? In bed with you?

    Maybe I'm feeling his pain if 2 hours solid
    2019 wins: Bottle of Prosecco; Popcorn Shed popcorn; Moisturising 'M&S Time Capsules'; Case of Boost Sport + £30 Just Eat voucher; Battle Proms tickets and hotel; under-eye serum...
    • Marvel1
    • By Marvel1 14th Jun 19, 12:41 PM
    • 4,406 Posts
    • 4,964 Thanks
    Marvel1
    • #8
    • 14th Jun 19, 12:41 PM
    • #8
    • 14th Jun 19, 12:41 PM
    It's life they will have to get over it.
    • Mojisola
    • By Mojisola 14th Jun 19, 12:53 PM
    • 31,544 Posts
    • 80,884 Thanks
    Mojisola
    • #9
    • 14th Jun 19, 12:53 PM
    • #9
    • 14th Jun 19, 12:53 PM
    And yes, he cries for like a straight 2 hours pretty much everyday
    Originally posted by robertboyd
    Presumably you've tried a range of things to stop this?

    I'd sort out the baby rather than try to sound-proof the house.
    • robertboyd
    • By robertboyd 14th Jun 19, 1:02 PM
    • 15 Posts
    • 6 Thanks
    robertboyd
    If not on a permanent basis, could you not just move the baby to another room, maybe temporarily? The hallway even? Lounge? In bed with you?

    Maybe I'm feeling his pain if 2 hours solid
    Originally posted by hazyjo
    Well, the best way is still to soundproof the wall because that would be long term solution. We have no other room to move the baby to.
    Presumably you've tried a range of things to stop this?

    I'd sort out the baby rather than try to sound-proof the house.
    Originally posted by Mojisola
    Well, the best way is still to soundproof the wall because that would be long term solution. We have no other room to move the baby to.
    • Mojisola
    • By Mojisola 14th Jun 19, 1:10 PM
    • 31,544 Posts
    • 80,884 Thanks
    Mojisola
    Well, the best way is still to soundproof the wall because that would be long term solution. We have no other room to move the baby to.
    Originally posted by robertboyd
    Nothing is going to work well enough to stop the baby's crying being heard next door.

    If you can stop the baby crying for so long, that would solve the problem.
    • mojo1
    • By mojo1 14th Jun 19, 1:13 PM
    • 994 Posts
    • 344 Thanks
    mojo1
    There is no way to block that sound unfortunately. It's just one of those things about living in a terrace house or flat, you have to put up with babies and later children making noise.
    • _shel
    • By _shel 14th Jun 19, 1:15 PM
    • 2,350 Posts
    • 4,324 Thanks
    _shel
    Buy him some ear plugs. Not like you're partying, it's just something he'll have to get used to.
    • Nasqueron
    • By Nasqueron 14th Jun 19, 1:15 PM
    • 7,603 Posts
    • 4,840 Thanks
    Nasqueron
    He could try earplugs.

    It's a baby, not a dog, nor loud drum 'n' bass at 3am.

    I think you're being more than accommodating.

    One thing, is the baby next to the adjoining wall? Is there another room/wall you could move the cot (or whatever) to?

    Is your baby literally crying for two hours every night, or a short time at some stage during those hours?
    Originally posted by hazyjo

    I hate children and I especially hate whiny babies crying, our old neighbours had one and our walls are reasonably thick and it still woke us up in the night. Anything a parent can do to minimise the discomfort for other people would be great, even if it's just hanging thick rugs on the wall for a while
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    • spo2
    • By spo2 14th Jun 19, 1:15 PM
    • 179 Posts
    • 76 Thanks
    spo2
    You don't have to move the baby permanently - just when he/she is crying.
    If you are lifting the baby and he or she is still crying when you are walking the floors and trying to comfort him, try doing it in another room - maybe even downstairs - until the crying subsides, then put him in the cot. That way the neighbour is not disturbed so much.

    If you are trying to let the baby "cry it out", then it is not working and you should maybe try another method. A baby crying for two hours in his bed is not good for anyone's stress levels!

    And remember - this will pass!
    • deannatrois
    • By deannatrois 14th Jun 19, 1:18 PM
    • 6,309 Posts
    • 8,890 Thanks
    deannatrois
    I had a baby who could cry for ages, used to take him to another room (downstairs) so I could at least listen to TV while trying to calm him down again, and reduce how much I disturbed others. If the baby cries for two hours there's just no advantage to staying in the bedroom. You can't nod off again, neither can the neighbour lol.
    • Damago
    • By Damago 14th Jun 19, 1:21 PM
    • 31 Posts
    • 9 Thanks
    Damago
    I'm in the same position as your neighbour, and have lost countless hours of sleep due to our neighbours baby crying but wouldn't send a note as I'm sure my neighbours aren't purposely letting their baby cry at all hours just to spite us. I've bought earplugs, they don't completely block the noise but have helped.

    We hear these neighbours in general a lot more than the previous couple who lived there, I think the previous couple must've had furniture up against our adjoining wall as we rarely heard them and know the same room it was used as their main bedroom.

    Don't really have much advice in the way of soundproofing but maybe knocking at your neighbours and politely saying you're also suffering from broken sleep but are looking in to what options there might be to reduce the noise travelling, to keep it friendly.
    • need an answer
    • By need an answer 14th Jun 19, 1:26 PM
    • 2,177 Posts
    • 2,620 Thanks
    need an answer
    does or has the neighbour ever had children?

    Crying happens...it reduces over time

    politely thank him for his letter and learn to live with it.


    Why on earth should you be even thinking of soundproofing,its a terraced house and its not uncommon to hear noise from nextdoor.
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    • robertboyd
    • By robertboyd 14th Jun 19, 2:20 PM
    • 15 Posts
    • 6 Thanks
    robertboyd
    Thank you very much you all!!
    Although I am quite sad to see that I could not sound proof the walls as I intended, your comments are really helpful.
    • oystercatcher
    • By oystercatcher 14th Jun 19, 2:45 PM
    • 1,937 Posts
    • 4,937 Thanks
    oystercatcher
    I agree , sort the baby rather than the wall.
    Have you spoken to health visitor or GP to check there isn't a health problem? Health visitors have all kinds of helpful ideas. Crying for two hours solid doesn't sound normal but maybe I was just lucky with my children?

    Certainly things like taking the child downstairs for a while might help the neighbours problem. I do know people who even resorted to driving the baby around in the night to get it off to sleep (huge assumption here that you have a car) walking up and down or pushing baby around in the buggy might help .

    Please check up to date advice though and never sleep with baby in a chair or settee as there is an increased risk of Cot Death / SIDS .

    Always remember this is a stage and will only last a few days/ weeks/ months at the most. You will get a routine and a sleeping baby eventually and it's not worth spending huge amounts of money on house alterations for such a short stage........ unless you are planning a HUGE family !!
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