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  • FIRST POST
    • Beenie
    • By Beenie 14th Jun 19, 9:26 AM
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    Beenie
    uPVC on top of asbestos panels?
    • #1
    • 14th Jun 19, 9:26 AM
    uPVC on top of asbestos panels? 14th Jun 19 at 9:26 AM
    I have another thread running on the topic of removing asbestos soffit boards, but have had another idea that I want to check here.

    The cost of removal of these boards is 12500 plus VAT. A local home improvement company that specialises in fascias and soffits has said that they would advise covering it over with new fascia, bargeboard and soffit board. They say that because the current arrangement is in good condition and undisturbed, so there is no pressing reason to remove it in their opinion. Also, the cost has now reduced to 4000 for white or 7000 for black uPVC.

    Does that price and method of fitting sound reasonable to any professional tradesman reading this?
Page 1
    • Kiran
    • By Kiran 14th Jun 19, 10:02 AM
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    Kiran
    • #2
    • 14th Jun 19, 10:02 AM
    • #2
    • 14th Jun 19, 10:02 AM
    How are you fixing the new over the old because if you are using mechanical fixing (screws, nails etc.) then you are disturbing the asbestos containing material.
    Some people don't exaggerate........... They just remember big!
    • Beenie
    • By Beenie 14th Jun 19, 10:32 AM
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    Beenie
    • #3
    • 14th Jun 19, 10:32 AM
    • #3
    • 14th Jun 19, 10:32 AM
    Sorry, I was mistaken about the soffits being covered. Because they are in good condition, they will remain (maybe have a good wash) and it's the wooden bargeboards and fascias that are being replaced with uPVC.
    • Dan-Dan
    • By Dan-Dan 14th Jun 19, 10:33 AM
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    Dan-Dan
    • #4
    • 14th Jun 19, 10:33 AM
    • #4
    • 14th Jun 19, 10:33 AM
    Sorry, I was mistaken about the soffits being covered. Because they are in good condition, they will remain (maybe have a good wash) and it's the wooden bargeboards and fascias that are being replaced with uPVC.
    Originally posted by Beenie
    They will still need to pin or nail to existing
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    • chunkytfg
    • By chunkytfg 14th Jun 19, 10:35 AM
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    chunkytfg
    • #5
    • 14th Jun 19, 10:35 AM
    • #5
    • 14th Jun 19, 10:35 AM
    Thats still A lot of money! 3k more for black over white when black looks to be about twice the price.

    How big is your house! seems like a lot of money!

    What were the prices you got from the other 2 quotes?
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    • Beenie
    • By Beenie 14th Jun 19, 10:36 AM
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    Beenie
    • #6
    • 14th Jun 19, 10:36 AM
    • #6
    • 14th Jun 19, 10:36 AM
    Hmm. I didn't speak to the fascia bloke, my husband did that and has reported back. I don't know if the actual fixing was discussed, but it sounds like there will still be a problem. I don't suppose it can be glued in place?
    • FreeBear
    • By FreeBear 14th Jun 19, 10:40 AM
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    FreeBear
    • #7
    • 14th Jun 19, 10:40 AM
    • #7
    • 14th Jun 19, 10:40 AM
    They say that because the current arrangement is in good condition and undisturbed, so there is no pressing reason to remove it in their opinion.
    Originally posted by Beenie

    If the existing boards are still in good condition, why bother over-boarding ?
    Just leave them in place and repaint.
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    • Beenie
    • By Beenie 14th Jun 19, 10:43 AM
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    Beenie
    • #8
    • 14th Jun 19, 10:43 AM
    • #8
    • 14th Jun 19, 10:43 AM
    because we are having an extension built, the house freshly rendered and hardi-boarded, and the dirty roofline will spoil the effect. The fascias, guttering etc need to be replaced or refreshed. Our builder says (quite rightly) he won't touch asbestos so that's why we got involved with specialist quotes (and were shocked with the price).
    • Doozergirl
    • By Doozergirl 14th Jun 19, 10:58 AM
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    Doozergirl
    • #9
    • 14th Jun 19, 10:58 AM
    • #9
    • 14th Jun 19, 10:58 AM
    'Specialist'. There's nothing special about fascias and soffits and there's no price difference between basic black and white. The stuff costs virtually nothing - nowhere close to the price difference in it's entirety, even.

    Don't speak to them again.

    Asbestos soffits are designed to last. They are literally like concrete, so the best thing you can do is leave them as they do the job they were designed for. I'll guess that the fascia and bargeboards aren't currently attached to the soffit and that there's no need to dislodge or drill into the existing soffits either, meaning it's safe to be near.

    I don't physically do this stuff, but the fascia attaches to the rafters, as do bargeboards, I'm sure. The soffits can just be left.
    Everything that is supposed to be in heaven is already here on earth.
    • FreeBear
    • By FreeBear 14th Jun 19, 11:38 AM
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    FreeBear
    Asbestos soffits are designed to last. They are literally like concrete, so the best thing you can do is leave them as they do the job they were designed for.
    Originally posted by Doozergirl
    https://www.gov.im/media/630695/asbestossoffits.pdf - Some soffits are made from asbestos insulation board which is fairly soft and friable. Others may be asbestos cement board which is (almost) as hard as concrete. The former, I would be concerned about and possibly try to get removed. The latter is of little risk and can be removed at minimal cost.
    Her courage will change the world.

    Treasure the moments that you have. Savour them for as long as you can for they will never come back again.
    • Beenie
    • By Beenie 14th Jun 19, 12:34 PM
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    Beenie
    it is useful to know that even the H&S executive consider over-cladding a reasonable way to deal with this material.

    We were very dispirited I have to say. Everything about our home improvement seems to be fighting us. The land slopes, so we need scaffolding for even small jobs; the land is mostly clay, so we need expensive piling under the proposed extension; and then the discovery of asbestos soffitt panels and the recommendation to get rid of it. Talk about a money pit.......
    • Kiran
    • By Kiran 14th Jun 19, 1:03 PM
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    Kiran

    We were very dispirited I have to say. Everything about our home improvement seems to be fighting us. The land slopes, so we need scaffolding for even small jobs; the land is mostly clay, so we need expensive piling under the proposed extension; and then the discovery of asbestos soffitt panels and the recommendation to get rid of it. Talk about a money pit.......
    Originally posted by Beenie


    You can write a book on the number of obstacles that get put in the way of what should be relatively simple jobs. Some you can laugh at others that make you want to throttle the previous owners, lol.


    If you want freshen up the asbestos cement boards you can paint them with an alkyd paint
    Some people don't exaggerate........... They just remember big!
    • Ruski
    • By Ruski 14th Jun 19, 1:08 PM
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    Ruski
    You can fit soffit boards too - they will not need to disturb the existing soffit panels.
    The 'starter trim' which will butt to the house brick can be screwed to the masonry, or (if you have the space) a batten can be screwed to the wall underneath the existing soffit, and then the uPVC soffits can attach the starter trim to that - this will lead to an extra 1" deeper fascia and barge boards, but that, again as Doozer says, is literally pennies to the cost.

    HTH

    Russ
    Perfection takes time: don't expect miracles in a day
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