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  • FIRST POST
    • bouicca21
    • By bouicca21 13th Jun 19, 4:52 PM
    • 4,636Posts
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    bouicca21
    Electric cable
    • #1
    • 13th Jun 19, 4:52 PM
    Electric cable 13th Jun 19 at 4:52 PM
    I have a soup maker - essentially a kettle with built in blender. I have had some building work done and the cable to the socket has gone awol. Now I could buy a replacement, but it occurs to me that the fitting into the appliance is just the same as a computer cable. Could I use one or is this a totally daft idea that would wreck the soup maker or trip the circuit?
Page 1
    • phill99
    • By phill99 13th Jun 19, 5:18 PM
    • 8,618 Posts
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    phill99
    • #2
    • 13th Jun 19, 5:18 PM
    • #2
    • 13th Jun 19, 5:18 PM
    Call the manufacturers helpline and buy a replacement flex. Then you know you will be getting the correctly rated one.


    Computer cables are rated at a lot less amperage than a blender / kettle, so using the incorrect one could be dangerous.
    Eat vegetables and fear no creditors, rather than eat duck and hide.
    • Robin9
    • By Robin9 13th Jun 19, 5:32 PM
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    Robin9
    • #3
    • 13th Jun 19, 5:32 PM
    • #3
    • 13th Jun 19, 5:32 PM
    Does your soup maker have a kettle type socket ? If so a standard kettle lead will be required.


    screwfix.com/p/power-supply-cord-5m/62235

    There are shorter ones
    Last edited by Robin9; 13-06-2019 at 5:34 PM. Reason: Screwfix link
    Never pay on an estimated bill
    • Ectophile
    • By Ectophile 13th Jun 19, 5:32 PM
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    Ectophile
    • #4
    • 13th Jun 19, 5:32 PM
    • #4
    • 13th Jun 19, 5:32 PM
    Check that the connectors are actually the same. Some hot appliances require a heat-resistant connector with a notch cut out. If the plug pushes in OK, then that's not the case here.


    Check the rating of the cable against the appliance's rating plate. Some computer cables are only rated at 5A, others 10A. If the appliance takes 1100W or less, then a 5A cable will do fine.


    If it takes between 1100 and 2200W, then look carefully at the connectors on both ends to check they are marked 10A or more. I have just looked at a random computer cable that's lying around and was surprised to see that the IEC connector that plugs into the appliance was marked 10A, but the mains plug at the other end was marked 5A, and was fitted with a 5A fuse.
    If it sticks, force it.
    If it breaks, well it wasn't working right anyway.
    • J B
    • By J B 13th Jun 19, 6:31 PM
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    J B
    • #5
    • 13th Jun 19, 6:31 PM
    • #5
    • 13th Jun 19, 6:31 PM
    I used to be a farmer, so I'm fairly adaptable
    My option would be to try it - does google give you any details of power supply, usage etc?
    • bris
    • By bris 13th Jun 19, 6:37 PM
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    bris
    • #6
    • 13th Jun 19, 6:37 PM
    • #6
    • 13th Jun 19, 6:37 PM
    Its basically a Kettle lead as they are called, they are all the same. It will be fitted with a 13amp fuse which is the important part.
    • stragglebod
    • By stragglebod 13th Jun 19, 9:29 PM
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    stragglebod
    • #7
    • 13th Jun 19, 9:29 PM
    • #7
    • 13th Jun 19, 9:29 PM
    Its basically a Kettle lead as they are called, they are all the same. It will be fitted with a 13amp fuse which is the important part.
    Originally posted by bris
    Nope.

    http://www.blogquail.com/the-difference-between-iec-connectors/

    So if you're not sure buy a 10A C15.

    Of course we're all assuming that it has a traditional kettle lead. My kettle doesn't, for example
    • bouicca21
    • By bouicca21 13th Jun 19, 10:23 PM
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    bouicca21
    • #8
    • 13th Jun 19, 10:23 PM
    • #8
    • 13th Jun 19, 10:23 PM
    Thank you everyone. I am so glad I asked!
    • ohreally
    • By ohreally 14th Jun 19, 7:26 AM
    • 7,130 Posts
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    ohreally
    • #9
    • 14th Jun 19, 7:26 AM
    • #9
    • 14th Jun 19, 7:26 AM
    Class 1 appliance, buy a 3 core lead (earthed) rated to 13A in case the load from the element is 3kW or if smaller element (likely) buy a lead suitable for the load. Due to their length, some leads fitted by the manufacturers are suspiciously light capacity.
    Donít be a canít, be a can.
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