Your browser isn't supported
It looks like you're using an old web browser. To get the most out of the site and to ensure guides display correctly, we suggest upgrading your browser now. Download the latest:

Welcome to the MSE Forums

We're home to a fantastic community of MoneySavers but anyone can post. Please exercise caution & report spam, illegal, offensive or libellous posts/messages: click "report" or email forumteam@. Skimlinks & other affiliated links are turned on

Search
  • FIRST POST
    • PeggyMay
    • By PeggyMay 13th Jun 19, 9:44 AM
    • 22Posts
    • 8Thanks
    PeggyMay
    Unacceptable delays from employer regarding my request
    • #1
    • 13th Jun 19, 9:44 AM
    Unacceptable delays from employer regarding my request 13th Jun 19 at 9:44 AM
    I asked my employer in September last year if they would consider putting my hours up a bit, as I am only working 18 hours a week and struggling to afford my bills. I have explained to them that I can work up to 25 hours a week but that 21 would suffice, and have put together what I think is a really solid business case for them giving me more hours.

    More than 8 months later, they STILL haven't got back to me about this, despite me chasing every month since then. Their excuse is that they still 'haven't found the capacity to undertake a review '.

    I wrote to the CEO last week pointing out how long I've had to wait, making it clear that I need an answer asap. She has arranged to meet with me at the end of this month to discuss. I had assumed a decision would be made at this meeting, but now I'm told it's just to 'talk me through the process I can expect'.

    Is it actually legal that they have been keeping me waiting so long, and continue to make me wait for a decision? If they do increase my hours, am I entitled to any back pay for what in effect amounts to loss of income as a result of them making me wait so long for an answer? (Since I originally made my request, I've had to make up the shortfall in my salary from my house savings.)

    Thank you.
Page 1
    • Comms69
    • By Comms69 13th Jun 19, 9:50 AM
    • 9,912 Posts
    • 11,903 Thanks
    Comms69
    • #2
    • 13th Jun 19, 9:50 AM
    • #2
    • 13th Jun 19, 9:50 AM
    I asked my employer in September last year if they would consider putting my hours up a bit, as I am only working 18 hours a week and struggling to afford my bills. I have explained to them that I can work up to 25 hours a week but that 21 would suffice, and have put together what I think is a really solid business case for them giving me more hours.

    More than 8 months later, they STILL haven't got back to me about this, despite me chasing every month since then. Their excuse is that they still 'haven't found the capacity to undertake a review '.

    I wrote to the CEO last week pointing out how long I've had to wait, making it clear that I need an answer asap. She has arranged to meet with me at the end of this month to discuss. I had assumed a decision would be made at this meeting, but now I'm told it's just to 'talk me through the process I can expect'.

    Is it actually legal that they have been keeping me waiting so long, and continue to make me wait for a decision? If they do increase my hours, am I entitled to any back pay for what in effect amounts to loss of income as a result of them making me wait so long for an answer? (Since I originally made my request, I've had to make up the shortfall in my salary from my house savings.)

    Thank you.
    Originally posted by PeggyMay


    Yes of course it's legal. They aren't going to give you any extra hours. That much is obvious.


    Why would you be entitled to backpay? You didn't do the work.


    Ultimately this situation is resolved by you finding a better / more suited job
    • polgara
    • By polgara 13th Jun 19, 9:55 AM
    • 424 Posts
    • 421 Thanks
    polgara
    • #3
    • 13th Jun 19, 9:55 AM
    • #3
    • 13th Jun 19, 9:55 AM
    Surely you would have been better served to have got a second job whilst waiting for whether you would get additional hours?


    You aren't entitled to increase your hours so wind your neck in and play nice otherwise you could really tick them off.
    • Exodi
    • By Exodi 13th Jun 19, 10:22 AM
    • 852 Posts
    • 1,079 Thanks
    Exodi
    • #4
    • 13th Jun 19, 10:22 AM
    • #4
    • 13th Jun 19, 10:22 AM
    I'm surprised they didn't just say "OK, we deny our request", you're not entitled to an increase?

    The back-pay suggestion did make my morning though so kudos to that!
    Know what you don't
    • bigisi
    • By bigisi 13th Jun 19, 10:28 AM
    • 732 Posts
    • 1,361 Thanks
    bigisi
    • #5
    • 13th Jun 19, 10:28 AM
    • #5
    • 13th Jun 19, 10:28 AM
    It's hilarious how many times across these forums people think something might be illegal just because they don't like it.

    Typical entitled attitude of today.
    • TELLIT01
    • By TELLIT01 13th Jun 19, 10:46 AM
    • 7,057 Posts
    • 7,662 Thanks
    TELLIT01
    • #6
    • 13th Jun 19, 10:46 AM
    • #6
    • 13th Jun 19, 10:46 AM
    Their excuse is that they still 'haven't found the capacity to undertake a review '.
    Originally posted by PeggyMay

    That's not an excuse, that's a perfectly valid business reason. I read it as meaning they haven't found additional work to justify reviewing your current hours. They have absolutely no obligation to give you extra hours just because you want or need them.
    If I was the manager I would simply there is no requirement for you to work additional hours and end the conversation.
    • MarkN88
    • By MarkN88 13th Jun 19, 11:53 AM
    • 1,049 Posts
    • 627 Thanks
    MarkN88
    • #7
    • 13th Jun 19, 11:53 AM
    • #7
    • 13th Jun 19, 11:53 AM
    All that time for you to wait? If it was that much of an issue you would of looked for a job with more hours or a second job in the meantime.

    Course your getting no back pay, even if they agreed to more hours now, your paid for the work done not that work you could have done.

    Id be laughing at you if you asked that of a CEO.
    • PeggyMay
    • By PeggyMay 13th Jun 19, 12:31 PM
    • 22 Posts
    • 8 Thanks
    PeggyMay
    • #8
    • 13th Jun 19, 12:31 PM
    • #8
    • 13th Jun 19, 12:31 PM
    Thanks for your replies. I didn't think it was illegal actually, or that I'd be entitled to back pay, but it was strongly suggested to me by someone who seemed to be very experienced in these matters, so I thought I should check to see if they were correct.

    I am not an expert in employment law, so please don't scoff just because you happen to know more about these things than someone else does.

    Of course I have sought alternative employment and continue to do so. But I have a very specific skillset, and a health problem which means I can only work part time. So it's not easy for me to find other suitable employment and so I have found nothing. So I really need to try and make this job work for me or eventually I will run out of savings, run into debt and possibly lose my home.
    • Comms69
    • By Comms69 13th Jun 19, 12:35 PM
    • 9,912 Posts
    • 11,903 Thanks
    Comms69
    • #9
    • 13th Jun 19, 12:35 PM
    • #9
    • 13th Jun 19, 12:35 PM
    Thanks for your replies. I didn't think it was illegal actually, or that I'd be entitled to back pay, but it was strongly suggested to me by someone who seemed to be very experienced in these matters, so I thought I should check to see if they were correct.

    I am not an expert in employment law, so please don't scoff just because you happen to know more about these things than someone else does.

    Of course I have sought alternative employment and continue to do so. But I have a very specific skillset, and a health problem which means I can only work part time. So it's not easy for me to find other suitable employment and so I have found nothing. So I really need to try and make this job work for me or eventually I will run out of savings, run into debt and possibly lose my home.
    Originally posted by PeggyMay

    Presumably you're claiming benefits?
    • TBagpuss
    • By TBagpuss 13th Jun 19, 12:42 PM
    • 7,588 Posts
    • 9,880 Thanks
    TBagpuss
    Unfortunately, your employers will be looking at it from a business perspective - do they have the extra hours available, and do they feel that the additional cost to them will be justified by the return.

    The fact that you need the hours isn't relevant to their decision.

    I thin kthat the friend you were talking to may have been confuised and been thinking of felexible working requests, where there are timescales for employers to respond, but yours is not a flexible working request, it is a request to increase your hours which is a purely private matter between you and your employer, to which they can say yes, or no, or 'not now'.

    And while they could have abeen clearer about it, by not coming back to you they are effectively saying 'not now'.

    If you are struiggling finacially, then it may make sense for you to look for part time work in a different filed, evne if that meansnot using your particualr skill set for the second job.
    • PeggyMay
    • By PeggyMay 13th Jun 19, 1:02 PM
    • 22 Posts
    • 8 Thanks
    PeggyMay
    Thank you TBagpuss for your friendly reply.

    Although many of the replies here have been less than friendly, they have been helpful in the sense that I now know not to listen to my friend. He told me it was illegal for them to not get back to me and that it would be reasonable to ask for backpay. So I'm glad I checked.
    • Comms69
    • By Comms69 13th Jun 19, 1:04 PM
    • 9,912 Posts
    • 11,903 Thanks
    Comms69
    Thank you TBagpuss for your friendly reply.

    Although many of the replies here have been less than friendly, they have been helpful in the sense that I now know not to listen to my friend. He told me it was illegal for them to not get back to me and that it would be reasonable to ask for backpay. So I'm glad I checked.
    Originally posted by PeggyMay


    Show him this thread, he can come and explain himself - maybe we've all missed something
    • steampowered
    • By steampowered 13th Jun 19, 1:31 PM
    • 3,636 Posts
    • 3,752 Thanks
    steampowered
    It is bad practice of the employer to not give you an answer. A good employer would at least tell you "yes" or "no", so you know where you stand.

    You have no right to more hours, obviously.

    After this period of time, I think it is safe to conclude that more hours are not on the cards.

    As others have said, if that doesn't work for you, time to start searching for another job or take a second job.
    • PeggyMay
    • By PeggyMay 13th Jun 19, 2:23 PM
    • 22 Posts
    • 8 Thanks
    PeggyMay
    Hi steampower, I am very much still hoping they will increase my hours... in the last few weeks I have brought in business opportunities that will help them achieve their organisational aim. There is a very strong and clear business case for them giving me the capacity needed to follow these up. I don't see why they would want to meet with me to 'discuss the process I can expect' if they weren't at least considering it... It just doesn't make sense for them to forego these opportunities which, if followed up, will be incredible for their business.

    Furthermore, I have explained that the job is unsustainable for me in the long-term on these hours. And although I haven't mentioned it, they must be aware that it will cost them much more to recruit someone new than to give me the small increase in hours needed to retain me. So there is no good business case to NOT increase my hours, so far as I can see.

    It's almost as though they want me to resign. But I can see no good reason for this, I'm a very productive and high-achieving employee.
    • shortcrust
    • By shortcrust 13th Jun 19, 3:26 PM
    • 2,513 Posts
    • 3,975 Thanks
    shortcrust
    In my experience things like letters to CEOs that go over managers heads do not go down well.

    They’re more likely to be planning for your exit rather than looking to increase your hours.

    It's almost as though they want me to resign. But I can see no good reason for this, I'm a very productive and high-achieving employee.
    Originally posted by PeggyMay
    Apart from the big red 'trouble maker' sticker that's recently been affixed to your HR file...
    Last edited by shortcrust; 13-06-2019 at 3:35 PM.
    • PeggyMay
    • By PeggyMay 13th Jun 19, 4:21 PM
    • 22 Posts
    • 8 Thanks
    PeggyMay
    Comms69, Iím not claiming benefits. Itís not a road I would particularly want to go down, and I donít think Iím entitled to any benefits anyway, as Iím capable of working up to five hours a day, five days a week, and already work more than the 16-or-less hours needed to claim.
    • PeggyMay
    • By PeggyMay 13th Jun 19, 4:46 PM
    • 22 Posts
    • 8 Thanks
    PeggyMay
    Shortcrust, I wrote a reply to you but it isn’t showing up so maybe it got lost in the system somewhere.

    I didn’t go over anyone’s head, I went through all the proper channels. They told me months ago that they would consider my request and make a decision. It’s now been several months, I keep getting the same old excuse about them not having time to look at my request yet, and so I have nudged them about it as the situation is getting more urgent for me and I needed to let them know this. I don’t think that qualifies as causing trouble, I just need a clear answer from them, as soon as possible, so that I can secure my future. Ideally, by continuing to work for them, and them only.

    Getting a second job will really be a last resort as juggling two jobs isn’t going to be great for my health. I tried that before. It didn’t work and I burned out.

    If they say no, then I might have to look for a second part time job but this is likely to impact on my current job and on my health, so I’m doing everything I can to make this job work for me so that I don’t have to go down that road.
    • Kentish Dave
    • By Kentish Dave 13th Jun 19, 5:03 PM
    • 806 Posts
    • 1,492 Thanks
    Kentish Dave
    I don’t know your firm, but if a member of my team did what you have done they’d move to the top of the list if redundancies ever came.

    You cannot go over your boss’s head like this without risking marking yourself out as trouble.
    • PeggyMay
    • By PeggyMay 13th Jun 19, 5:16 PM
    • 22 Posts
    • 8 Thanks
    PeggyMay
    But I didnít go over anyoneís head. I followed the instructions set out by my manager.
    • TELLIT01
    • By TELLIT01 13th Jun 19, 5:17 PM
    • 7,057 Posts
    • 7,662 Thanks
    TELLIT01
    There is a very strong and clear business case for them giving me the capacity needed to follow these up.
    Originally posted by PeggyMay

    Two points.



    You may feel there is a strong and sustainable business case for additional working hours. The management of the company will know a lot more about their requirements than you do, and have a better understanding of the additional costs of extra working hours.


    Even if there is a valid case for additional working hours, they are not bound to give those extra hours to you. You have said that you can only work limited hours because of a health issue, so it makes little sense from a business perspective to give extra hours to somebody when it might have a detrimental effect on them.
Welcome to our new Forum!

Our aim is to save you money quickly and easily. We hope you like it!

Forum Team Contact us

Live Stats

162Posts Today

1,766Users online

Martin's Twitter