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  • FIRST POST
    • Cleothecat
    • By Cleothecat 12th Jun 19, 9:16 PM
    • 3Posts
    • 1Thanks
    Cleothecat
    Vent about doctor
    • #1
    • 12th Jun 19, 9:16 PM
    Vent about doctor 12th Jun 19 at 9:16 PM
    I'm not nuts or anything but what I'm about to say actually happened.
    My GP referred me to ent because of pulsatile tinnitus. I've a family history of brain bleeds. The ent dr says - we'll do an mri with contrast on your ear and neck but I can't check if you have an aneurysm. When I get the letter, it's mri without contrast. I call ent to say 'I thought you said with contrast' but it's after 5pm. So called x-ray department and explained my symptoms and family history. The radiologist says that ent dr didn't mention brain bleed history but with that history, it should be mri and mra with contrast of whole head. I get that done - needle with contrast agent etc and wait for results.
    I'm made to wait 8 weeks for results but guess what - the report says I didn't get contrast. I blooming well did. I'm not that dumb.
    To me, it looks like she (ent dr) feels I stepped on her toes and she asked for minimal info or the radiographer who said 'mri without contrast' is the one who's !!!!ed off.
    Either way, my symptoms are getting worse and if I do have an aneurysm, I hope it doesn't burst when I'm driving. Good old nhs.
    Last edited by Cleothecat; 12-06-2019 at 9:21 PM.
Page 1
    • esuhl
    • By esuhl 13th Jun 19, 4:41 AM
    • 8,985 Posts
    • 7,050 Thanks
    esuhl
    • #2
    • 13th Jun 19, 4:41 AM
    • #2
    • 13th Jun 19, 4:41 AM
    The NHS is totally broken. Both my parents died as a result of their incompetence. My father was misdiagnosed after an MRI scanner broke and they couldn't be bothered to transfer him to another hospital for the scan, so incorrectly guessed a diagnosis, and gave him a treatment that killed him.

    My mother repeatedly visited the doctors over a period of 18 months as her stomach pain increased, leaving her unable to use the toilet for three weeks, or eat for a week. She collapsed, was rush to hospital, given intravenous fluids, and released the next day with no diagnosis attempted.

    After 18 months she was rushed to hospital by ambulance after collapsing, having not been to the toilet for three weeks, and only eating a single biscuit or half an egg a day for weeks.

    She was given fluids overnight, and discharged the next day. No solution was proposed for her inability to eat, and no attempt at diagnosis was made.

    The next few weeks resulted in her going in and out of hospital after collapsing.

    She feared for her life and paid for a private GP who told her he was furious with the way she'd been treated, refused to take her money, and said he'd get the NHS to treat her. Sadly he failed.

    Eventually, mum collapsed again mere minutes after being discharged from hospital. The had a look at her and said, quite unapologetically that she had bowel cancer which had been left untreated for so long that it had spread to other organs and she would die imminently.

    I had to keep a close eye on my parents in hospital too. I noticed my mother had been given an oxygen mask, but the nurses hadn't connected it, so the oxygen was just hissing out of a tube and into the ward. Another time, she was groaning and shifting around, and I noticed that her catheter had been clamped shut. I opened it and litres of urine suddenly filled the bag.

    Even with diligent family members looking out for my parents, trying to get the NHS to fulfil is most BASIC obligations was nigh-on impossible.

    The worst thing was the way my parents were treated as just another statistic. There was no real compassion or care. They were repeatedly turned away until it was too late. Both had conditions that were survivable, if any kind of common-sense had been applied to their diagnosis and treatment.

    With the NHS pushed beyond breaking point, I wonder if the failure to treat my parents was a calculated move. Cancer survivors clog up hospitals, and cost a fortune in drugs. Are the NHS deliberately delaying treatment and killing people to reduce demand on the system and save money?
    • K80 Black
    • By K80 Black 13th Jun 19, 6:17 AM
    • 423 Posts
    • 865 Thanks
    K80 Black
    • #3
    • 13th Jun 19, 6:17 AM
    • #3
    • 13th Jun 19, 6:17 AM
    Cancer survivors clog up hospitals, and cost a fortune in drugs. Are the NHS deliberately delaying treatment and killing people to reduce demand on the system and save money?
    Originally posted by esuhl
    Though I'm sorry to hear about your parents, you've got your facts wrong about cancer survivors. My partner had cancer (testicular) - after the orchiectomy, he received 2 rounds of chemo (which were optional) and had a few blood tests. Hardly clogging the system or even costing a fortune!

    This is partially because he was otherwise healthy. He was fit going into surgery, didn't suffer any complications and aside from the chemo, has only ever needed some omeprazole for heartburn.

    You can't make blanket statements like that - especially about something as diverse as cancer. Cancer hits people from all walks of life, has wildy different treatments and outcomes depending on what kind of cancer - of course a young, fit person will fare better than someone old and already ill.

    In some cases, elderly people with cancer choose not to have treatment because although it may prolong their life, they realise that they're far more likely to have complications and spend the rest of their life in hospital. They would prefer to have a shorter amount of time with a better quality of life.

    It's ludicrous to think that the NHS would deliberately kill people. Everyone has to die at some point.
    • ToxicWomble
    • By ToxicWomble 13th Jun 19, 11:59 AM
    • 136 Posts
    • 215 Thanks
    ToxicWomble
    • #4
    • 13th Jun 19, 11:59 AM
    • #4
    • 13th Jun 19, 11:59 AM
    Go spend a day in a busy cancer hospital and then come back here and tell us you opinions then.
    • milliemonster
    • By milliemonster 13th Jun 19, 7:55 PM
    • 3,625 Posts
    • 6,278 Thanks
    milliemonster
    • #5
    • 13th Jun 19, 7:55 PM
    • #5
    • 13th Jun 19, 7:55 PM
    you really believe consultants and radiographers would really be so spiteful as to deliberately write something like that out of spite? are you serious? the NHS is so busy that honestly staff don't have time or inclination to play such childish games, my guess is this was a pure administrative error, nothing more, you had your MRI, with contrast and got the results yes? you know most NHS workers want to do the best for their patients? thats what we are all in the job for at the end of the day, noone goes into to it cause harm, but we are all human and can and do make mistakes sometimes, and before someone chimes in that mistakes cost lives, yes I accept that sometimes that does, but can you give me a better solution as to how humans can never make errors?
    • POPPYOSCAR
    • By POPPYOSCAR 13th Jun 19, 8:04 PM
    • 12,863 Posts
    • 28,559 Thanks
    POPPYOSCAR
    • #6
    • 13th Jun 19, 8:04 PM
    • #6
    • 13th Jun 19, 8:04 PM
    Though I'm sorry to hear about your parents, you've got your facts wrong about cancer survivors. My partner had cancer (testicular) - after the orchiectomy, he received 2 rounds of chemo (which were optional) and had a few blood tests. Hardly clogging the system or even costing a fortune!

    This is partially because he was otherwise healthy. He was fit going into surgery, didn't suffer any complications and aside from the chemo, has only ever needed some omeprazole for heartburn.

    You can't make blanket statements like that - especially about something as diverse as cancer. Cancer hits people from all walks of life, has wildy different treatments and outcomes depending on what kind of cancer - of course a young, fit person will fare better than someone old and already ill.

    In some cases, elderly people with cancer choose not to have treatment because although it may prolong their life, they realise that they're far more likely to have complications and spend the rest of their life in hospital. They would prefer to have a shorter amount of time with a better quality of life.

    It's ludicrous to think that the NHS would deliberately kill people. Everyone has to die at some point.
    Originally posted by K80 Black
    When you have had a family member receive poor treatment it can feel like it.
    • Manxman in exile
    • By Manxman in exile 13th Jun 19, 8:55 PM
    • 2,890 Posts
    • 2,601 Thanks
    Manxman in exile
    • #7
    • 13th Jun 19, 8:55 PM
    • #7
    • 13th Jun 19, 8:55 PM
    Sadly, the standard of care between (and sometimes within) hospitals can vary widely and isn't really "national".


    Back in February my GP got me an emergency admission to our local acute hospital with just a ten minute 'phone call during my appointment. (I'd been to A&E the day before and the experience was not good.)


    Within a couple of hours I was admitted and stayed in for six nights. The standard of nursing and personal care that I, and the other in-patients in my side ward, received was superb and couldn't really have been improved on. They really wanted to help you and to make you comfortable.


    And yet, I've heard "horror" stories from friends whom I trust that would make you think it wasn't the same hospital.
    • esuhl
    • By esuhl 14th Jun 19, 3:11 AM
    • 8,985 Posts
    • 7,050 Thanks
    esuhl
    • #8
    • 14th Jun 19, 3:11 AM
    • #8
    • 14th Jun 19, 3:11 AM
    It's ludicrous to think that the NHS would deliberately kill people. Everyone has to die at some point.
    Originally posted by K80 Black
    I'm not saying that the someone in the NHS decides to kill people. I'm saying that the system is broken.

    My friend's uncle had an almost identical experience to my mother. He also spent around 18 months receiving no care, no diagnosis, and being repeatedly turned away. Eventually they decided to run some tests, but again it was too late and he died shortly after.

    The actual treatments provided by the NHS are excellent. But nursing standards are poor due to understaffing. The main problem is the complete lack of interest in diagnosing anyone.

    It's a systemic failure. Presumably, doctors are so overworked that unless you are dying in front of them, they're not interested in finding out what's wrong with you.

    How can a healthy, working-age woman be left in increasing pain for months on end, to the point where she is repeatedly collapsing and being rushed to hospital, having not eaten or used a toilet for weeks...? And on every occasion, kept in overnight and released the next morning with absolutely no concern for her health?

    You don't need to be a medical expert to see the overwhelming lack of care provided by the NHS is needlessly killing people.
    • esuhl
    • By esuhl 14th Jun 19, 3:23 AM
    • 8,985 Posts
    • 7,050 Thanks
    esuhl
    • #9
    • 14th Jun 19, 3:23 AM
    • #9
    • 14th Jun 19, 3:23 AM
    A month or so after being diagnosed with end-stage bowel cancer, laying on her deathbed, my mother received a mail-shot from the NHS. It promoted early screening for bowel cancer, advising anyone with symptoms they should ask to be tested.

    It memorably explained how important it was that bowel cancer be detected early to give the best chance of it being successfully treated.

    Quite ironic that she was left for a year and a half with such symptoms and NONE of the doctors or nurses she saw suggested ANY tests at all. Instead they persisted with giving her tablets that had ZERO effect, and turned her away at every opportunity.

    How can someone who hasn't eaten for three weeks, and is unable to walk or use the toilet, simply be discharged from hospital? How long did they want her to go without food before trying to find out if there was anything wrong with her?
    • K80 Black
    • By K80 Black 14th Jun 19, 6:02 AM
    • 423 Posts
    • 865 Thanks
    K80 Black
    Doctors are humans and sometimes make mistakes. It's certainly happened to me - I was receiving both iron for anemia and an antibiotic for an infection, yet somehow both were getting worse. I happened to look up all my drug interactions on drugs.com and noticed that if you take the iron and antibiotics at the same time, neither work.

    This was in a hospital setting, I was very unwell and it was quite a serious mistake. I pointed it out to the doctor and asked his advice (as the Internet can be wrong!) - he consulted his big book of drugs and apologised profusely.

    I ended up needing surgery for the infection, and a blood transfusion for the anemia.

    Do I blame them? No. Not in the slightest. They're just humans, like you or me, who have chosen to take on a very hard job. It's not deliberate, it's not negligence, it's just a human making a mistake. And when they do, sometimes people die.
    • Wanderingpomm
    • By Wanderingpomm 14th Jun 19, 9:55 AM
    • 245 Posts
    • 232 Thanks
    Wanderingpomm
    If you are really unhappy with the NHS there is nothing to prevent you taking out private insurance, both bupa and vitality offer an excellent service. Obviously it will cost you but that is a viable alternative
    • esuhl
    • By esuhl 14th Jun 19, 11:58 AM
    • 8,985 Posts
    • 7,050 Thanks
    esuhl
    Doctors are humans and sometimes make mistakes.
    Originally posted by K80 Black

    Sometimes, yes. Repeated, consistent failure by both GPs and hospital staff, during dozens of visits over a few years cannot be put down to mere "mistakes".
    • esuhl
    • By esuhl 14th Jun 19, 12:18 PM
    • 8,985 Posts
    • 7,050 Thanks
    esuhl
    If you are really unhappy with the NHS there is nothing to prevent you taking out private insurance, both bupa and vitality offer an excellent service. Obviously it will cost you but that is a viable alternative
    Originally posted by Wanderingpomm
    Sure. There's nothing to stop you or I taking out private insurance, but what about all those who can't or won't? Do you really have no compassion at all towards them? Do they deserve to be mistreated to the point of death?

    If, as you say, private insurance is a viable alternative, why don't we scrap the NHS so that people in this country can receive adequate healthcare?
    • bobwilson
    • By bobwilson 14th Jun 19, 12:19 PM
    • 560 Posts
    • 189 Thanks
    bobwilson
    I agree with sentiments here that NHS is completely broken. I won't go into the (many) (various) true stories I, my friends & family have. Perhaps more importantly, the results were disastrous and in some cases tragic, needless & the most basic care would have been preventative.
    • parkrunner
    • By parkrunner 14th Jun 19, 2:28 PM
    • 2,247 Posts
    • 3,618 Thanks
    parkrunner
    The NHS is totally broken.
    Originally posted by esuhl
    No it's not. I've had nothing but great service from the NHS as have millions of others. I'm not saying it's perfect as nothing is but for the majority it still works very well.
    It's nothing , not nothink.
    • Smellyonion
    • By Smellyonion 14th Jun 19, 2:46 PM
    • 248 Posts
    • 185 Thanks
    Smellyonion
    The NHS is totally broken. Both my parents died as a result of their incompetence. My father was misdiagnosed after an MRI scanner broke and they couldn't be bothered to transfer him to another hospital for the scan, so incorrectly guessed a diagnosis, and gave him a treatment that killed him.

    My mother repeatedly visited the doctors over a period of 18 months as her stomach pain increased, leaving her unable to use the toilet for three weeks, or eat for a week. She collapsed, was rush to hospital, given intravenous fluids, and released the next day with no diagnosis attempted.

    After 18 months she was rushed to hospital by ambulance after collapsing, having not been to the toilet for three weeks, and only eating a single biscuit or half an egg a day for weeks.

    She was given fluids overnight, and discharged the next day. No solution was proposed for her inability to eat, and no attempt at diagnosis was made.

    The next few weeks resulted in her going in and out of hospital after collapsing.

    She feared for her life and paid for a private GP who told her he was furious with the way she'd been treated, refused to take her money, and said he'd get the NHS to treat her. Sadly he failed.

    Eventually, mum collapsed again mere minutes after being discharged from hospital. The had a look at her and said, quite unapologetically that she had bowel cancer which had been left untreated for so long that it had spread to other organs and she would die imminently.

    I had to keep a close eye on my parents in hospital too. I noticed my mother had been given an oxygen mask, but the nurses hadn't connected it, so the oxygen was just hissing out of a tube and into the ward. Another time, she was groaning and shifting around, and I noticed that her catheter had been clamped shut. I opened it and litres of urine suddenly filled the bag.

    Even with diligent family members looking out for my parents, trying to get the NHS to fulfil is most BASIC obligations was nigh-on impossible.

    The worst thing was the way my parents were treated as just another statistic. There was no real compassion or care. They were repeatedly turned away until it was too late. Both had conditions that were survivable, if any kind of common-sense had been applied to their diagnosis and treatment.

    With the NHS pushed beyond breaking point, I wonder if the failure to treat my parents was a calculated move. Cancer survivors clog up hospitals, and cost a fortune in drugs. Are the NHS deliberately delaying treatment and killing people to reduce demand on the system and save money?
    Originally posted by esuhl

    Your father was killed by the incorrect treatment? Do you have proof of this? sounds like a legal case.


    As for the private doctor and your mother, he refused to take your money and diagnose her? why not? It doesn't make sense.
    • K80 Black
    • By K80 Black 14th Jun 19, 4:42 PM
    • 423 Posts
    • 865 Thanks
    K80 Black
    Sometimes, yes. Repeated, consistent failure by both GPs and hospital staff, during dozens of visits over a few years cannot be put down to mere "mistakes".
    Originally posted by esuhl
    So you're saying they're malicious? Deliberately killing people? Negligent? Just not bothering to do their job?

    If it is so easy to diagnose, why didn't you spend an evening on Google and do it yourself?
    • ToxicWomble
    • By ToxicWomble 14th Jun 19, 7:48 PM
    • 136 Posts
    • 215 Thanks
    ToxicWomble
    We are getting too efficient at keeping ill people alive, people are living to an older age and require treatment for longer — all of this costs way more than it did 20 years ago.
    Yes, the NHS is underfunded yadda yadda —but broken — nope not while we have so many wonder staff working within the service !!
    • Mrs_Ryan
    • By Mrs_Ryan 15th Jun 19, 12:17 AM
    • 11,029 Posts
    • 20,866 Thanks
    Mrs_Ryan
    I have PTSD due to what the NHS did to me- and I was an employee at the time!
    Open University Graduate 2017; MA at DMU complete 2018- MERIT!! Round 2 OU 2018- BSc Combined STEM (Sports Psychology) Year 1 Complete! E117 (Passed) and DE100. Year 2- K220 and E235.
    Got Engaged 02/10/2018 Civil Partnership 15/02/20
    Strictly 2019- TEAM RAMSEY!
    Elle
    • POPPYOSCAR
    • By POPPYOSCAR 15th Jun 19, 8:15 AM
    • 12,863 Posts
    • 28,559 Thanks
    POPPYOSCAR
    So you're saying they're malicious? Deliberately killing people? Negligent? Just not bothering to do their job?

    If it is so easy to diagnose, why didn't you spend an evening on Google and do it yourself?
    Originally posted by K80 Black
    Sometimes that is what happens.

    There was a case of a lady who was told by her hospital that her condition was unoperable and she should make the best of the time she had left.

    Her family found another hospital on the other side of the country prepared to do it and it was successful.

    I saw one of the top heart surgeons in the world saying that very often surgeons do not want to do the most difficult cases because they do not want it to reflect on their success rate .
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