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  • FIRST POST
    • JEN22
    • By JEN22 22nd May 19, 2:17 PM
    • 602Posts
    • 108Thanks
    JEN22
    weed killer
    • #1
    • 22nd May 19, 2:17 PM
    weed killer 22nd May 19 at 2:17 PM
    Does anyone know where to buy a great weedkiller that can be watered down and put into a garden sprayer.


    Roundup is costing me a bomb
Page 1
    • Grenage
    • By Grenage 22nd May 19, 2:29 PM
    • 1,798 Posts
    • 1,729 Thanks
    Grenage
    • #2
    • 22nd May 19, 2:29 PM
    • #2
    • 22nd May 19, 2:29 PM
    Something like Rosate 360 can be bought online; very cost effective.
    • Sarahdol75
    • By Sarahdol75 22nd May 19, 4:33 PM
    • 7,159 Posts
    • 93,350 Thanks
    Sarahdol75
    • #3
    • 22nd May 19, 4:33 PM
    • #3
    • 22nd May 19, 4:33 PM
    My mum has been using white vinegar to use on weeds and her drive and patio, its killed everything off, and its very cheap.
    • Justagardener
    • By Justagardener 22nd May 19, 5:59 PM
    • 189 Posts
    • 168 Thanks
    Justagardener
    • #4
    • 22nd May 19, 5:59 PM
    • #4
    • 22nd May 19, 5:59 PM
    Neudorff concentrate. Gardeners expect roundup from the garden centre to work straight away, of course it won't work quickly. Any glyphosate product (rosate, gallup, round up) will take 3 weeks at least to show some effect but it will work, properly but eventually.
    https://theperfectgarden.co.uk/the-best-weed-killers-for-your-garden-and-how-to-use-weed-killers-successfully/
    Last edited by Justagardener; 28-06-2019 at 8:13 AM.
    • Aidanmc
    • By Aidanmc 22nd May 19, 7:07 PM
    • 141 Posts
    • 50 Thanks
    Aidanmc
    • #5
    • 22nd May 19, 7:07 PM
    • #5
    • 22nd May 19, 7:07 PM
    My mum has been using white vinegar to use on weeds and her drive and patio, its killed everything off, and its very cheap.
    Originally posted by Sarahdol75
    And not toxic like glyphosate products!
    • elsien
    • By elsien 22nd May 19, 7:10 PM
    • 19,383 Posts
    • 49,193 Thanks
    elsien
    • #6
    • 22nd May 19, 7:10 PM
    • #6
    • 22nd May 19, 7:10 PM
    And not toxic like glyphosate products!
    Originally posted by Aidanmc
    Not convinced it'd work on my knotweed though.
    All shall be well, and all shall be well, and all manner of things shall be well.

    Pedant alert - it's could have, not could of.
    • Aidanmc
    • By Aidanmc 22nd May 19, 7:17 PM
    • 141 Posts
    • 50 Thanks
    Aidanmc
    • #7
    • 22nd May 19, 7:17 PM
    • #7
    • 22nd May 19, 7:17 PM
    Does anyone know where to buy a great weedkiller that can be watered down and put into a garden sprayer.


    Roundup is costing me a bomb
    Originally posted by JEN22

    Are you aware of the health risks associated with using toxic weedkillers like roundup?
    • Davesnave
    • By Davesnave 22nd May 19, 7:54 PM
    • 28,725 Posts
    • 100,691 Thanks
    Davesnave
    • #8
    • 22nd May 19, 7:54 PM
    • #8
    • 22nd May 19, 7:54 PM
    And not toxic like glyphosate products!
    Originally posted by Aidanmc
    Yes, glyphosate is so toxic it's the only weedlkiller approved for use in and around UK waterways.
    'I've suffered for my music, now it's your turn.' Neil Innes, introducing 'Protest Song.'
    • Davesnave
    • By Davesnave 22nd May 19, 8:02 PM
    • 28,725 Posts
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    Davesnave
    • #9
    • 22nd May 19, 8:02 PM
    • #9
    • 22nd May 19, 8:02 PM
    Are you aware of the health risks associated with using toxic weedkillers like roundup?
    Originally posted by Aidanmc
    No, are you? What are the specific risks and how do they compare with others, like living near a busy road, eating bacon or barbecued food, or driving down the M4?
    'I've suffered for my music, now it's your turn.' Neil Innes, introducing 'Protest Song.'
    • Aidanmc
    • By Aidanmc 22nd May 19, 8:25 PM
    • 141 Posts
    • 50 Thanks
    Aidanmc
    Chemical weedkillers are toxic, its widespread knowledge at present.
    You can make your own choices but you need to be aware of the risks.
    https://www.sciencemag.org/news/2019/05/costly-cancer-lawsuits-may-spur-search-replace-worlds-most-common-weed-killer.
    • elsien
    • By elsien 22nd May 19, 9:10 PM
    • 19,383 Posts
    • 49,193 Thanks
    elsien
    Lawsuits in the USA, possibly the most litigious country, isn't a particularly reliable indicator as to whether something is safe or not.
    All shall be well, and all shall be well, and all manner of things shall be well.

    Pedant alert - it's could have, not could of.
    • Davesnave
    • By Davesnave 23rd May 19, 12:46 AM
    • 28,725 Posts
    • 100,691 Thanks
    Davesnave
    Chemical weedkillers are toxic, its widespread knowledge at present.
    You can make your own choices but you need to be aware of the risks.
    https://www.sciencemag.org/news/2019/05/costly-cancer-lawsuits-may-spur-search-replace-worlds-most-common-weed-killer.
    Originally posted by Aidanmc

    A good article, but not a great one to back your scary question: "Are you aware of the health risks associated with using toxic weedkillers like roundup?

    Do you also lurk on cookery forums and write "Are you aware of the health risks associated with that beef in your spaghetti bolognese?"

    People should indeed make their own choices and risk assessments, based on the best evidence available at the time. The evidence at present is that using glyphosate in a domestic situation is as safe as many other everyday activities, provided care is taken mixing it and common sense is applied in its use/clean up afterwards.

    I'm forever pointing out here that whether people use glyphosate themselves, there are many food products where it will have been used during production. The only way to avoid it is to buy certified organic produce....or grow your own.
    'I've suffered for my music, now it's your turn.' Neil Innes, introducing 'Protest Song.'
    • madjackslam
    • By madjackslam 23rd May 19, 8:17 AM
    • 249 Posts
    • 264 Thanks
    madjackslam
    I agree. For a domestic gardener, if you use it properly, glyphosate seems pretty low risk. I use it maybe twice a year on some bits of paving/gravel, and I can't say it worries me. I take care with euphorbia sap, bramble thorns getting infected, breathing in compost or petrol, rats peeing in the compost heap, next door's bonfire... but I'm not going to stop growing euphorbia, picking blackberries, using compost, mowing the lawn, or composting. I'd stop next door's bonfires if I could, but only because they don't check first if we've putting the washing out
    • frankie
    • By frankie 23rd May 19, 11:17 AM
    • 755 Posts
    • 295 Thanks
    frankie
    another vote for Rosate. Just use sensible precautions.
    • Farway
    • By Farway 23rd May 19, 1:02 PM
    • 7,405 Posts
    • 14,130 Thanks
    Farway
    A good article, but not a great one to back your scary question: "Are you aware of the health risks associated with using toxic weedkillers like roundup?

    Do you also lurk on cookery forums and write "Are you aware of the health risks associated with that beef in your spaghetti bolognese?"

    People should indeed make their own choices and risk assessments, based on the best evidence available at the time. The evidence at present is that using glyphosate in a domestic situation is as safe as many other everyday activities, provided care is taken mixing it and common sense is applied in its use/clean up afterwards.

    I'm forever pointing out here that whether people use glyphosate themselves, there are many food products where it will have been used during production. The only way to avoid it is to buy certified organic produce....or grow your own.
    Originally posted by Davesnave
    Sensible as usual
    If using US lawsuits as guide to harm, maybe consider this one for baby talc? Maybe us it as a weedkiller?

    https://www.nytimes.com/2018/07/12/business/johnson-johnson-talcum-powder.html
    • greyteam1959
    • By greyteam1959 23rd May 19, 3:42 PM
    • 2,654 Posts
    • 1,247 Thanks
    greyteam1959
    What exactly is the OP trying to kill with Roundup ??
    • DigForVictory
    • By DigForVictory 23rd May 19, 3:59 PM
    • 9,629 Posts
    • 32,467 Thanks
    DigForVictory
    Horses for courses. Roundup comes in different forms & at different strengths & you can send a lot of money on the low voltage stuff that isn't going to exterminate your knotweed issue in anything under five decades.

    If you solved your weed problems with vinegar, hurrah & eco-friendly and affordable and all these other good things.

    If you are up against an aggressively invasive species, you need the heavier chemistry & an acceptance that it may not be 100% safe for you the gardener, but most of the gardening community tend to live to terrifying old ages, so fingers crossed OP is one of the lucky ones.
    • JEN22
    • By JEN22 25th May 19, 3:30 AM
    • 602 Posts
    • 108 Thanks
    JEN22
    Im just trying to kill general weeds in block paving and patio. I guess Rosate is the way forward.


    Thanks for all responses
    • fatbelly
    • By fatbelly 25th May 19, 6:13 AM
    • 13,976 Posts
    • 11,004 Thanks
    fatbelly
    Im just trying to kill general weeds in block paving and patio. I guess Rosate is the way forward.


    Thanks for all responses
    Originally posted by JEN22
    It was mentioned earlier. For those sort of weeds, it is worth giving white vinegar a try. I was using a garden centre spray (can't remember which one) and it was not very effective. My wife stated using vinegar from a normal vinegar shaker bottle and it killed the lot!
    • Davesnave
    • By Davesnave 25th May 19, 7:50 AM
    • 28,725 Posts
    • 100,691 Thanks
    Davesnave
    It was mentioned earlier. For those sort of weeds, it is worth giving white vinegar a try. I was using a garden centre spray (can't remember which one) and it was not very effective. My wife stated using vinegar from a normal vinegar shaker bottle and it killed the lot!
    Originally posted by fatbelly
    As has been pointed out, glyphosate will not be seen to work immediately, or even soon. For many people, 3 weeks is too long to wait. Glyphosate disrupts the plant's ability to photosynthesise, so it experiences a slow death from being unable to manufacture food from nutrients.

    White vinegar, being a concentrated acid, will attack the plant cells physically, giving results much sooner, leading to greater satisfaction for those who want to see cause & effect quickly.

    Because it degrades rapidly, glyphosate will have no residual effect and new weeds might start to grow in cracks on patios even before the sprayed ones have died!

    So...what many people want to do is poison the soil between the slabs, or place a chemical in there that will inhibit seed germination for a decent length of time. This is understandable, but the chemical which used to be used, sodium chlorate, was banned in 2011 and professional germination inhibitors are only available for pro use at a high cost......hence 'home remedies.'

    What the effect of thousands using white vinegar might be, I can't say, but certainly water authorities wanted sodium chlorate out of run-off water, presumably for good reasons. Our rivers are full enough of contaminants.
    Last edited by Davesnave; 25-05-2019 at 7:55 AM.
    'I've suffered for my music, now it's your turn.' Neil Innes, introducing 'Protest Song.'
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