Your browser isn't supported
It looks like you're using an old web browser. To get the most out of the site and to ensure guides display correctly, we suggest upgrading your browser now. Download the latest:

Welcome to the MSE Forums

We're home to a fantastic community of MoneySavers but anyone can post. Please exercise caution & report spam, illegal, offensive or libellous posts/messages: click "report" or email forumteam@. Skimlinks & other affiliated links are turned on

Search
  • FIRST POST
    • happyhero
    • By happyhero 17th May 19, 4:52 PM
    • 1,186Posts
    • 56Thanks
    happyhero
    Are steels required if I fit large lantern into roof
    • #1
    • 17th May 19, 4:52 PM
    Are steels required if I fit large lantern into roof 17th May 19 at 4:52 PM
    Hi I have a flat roof on an extension that is 6.3m wide and 4m deep. The felt is in a bad state and so I want to get it recovered but we would now like to fit a large lantern into the roof of 4m x 2m.


    Will we need steels or will timber still be ok?


    Ive spoken to one guy who is a builder and he said no because there wont be a major difference in weight compared with all the timber joists and ply sheets and felt etc, but I wondered because the span on one side will be 4m for the opening, what do you think?


    I understand that you double up on the timbers around the opening but is that enough?


    The window cleaner will still walk on the roof to get to everything.


    Any help/advice appreciated.
Page 1
    • FreeBear
    • By FreeBear 17th May 19, 5:07 PM
    • 2,430 Posts
    • 3,308 Thanks
    FreeBear
    • #2
    • 17th May 19, 5:07 PM
    • #2
    • 17th May 19, 5:07 PM
    Hi I have a flat roof on an extension that is 6.3m wide and 4m deep. The felt is in a bad state and so I want to get it recovered but we would now like to fit a large lantern into the roof of 4m x 2m.

    Will we need steels or will timber still be ok?
    Originally posted by happyhero

    You really need to talk to a structural engineer rather than a builder. Depending on the height of the lantern, there is going to be a considerable weight in terms of glass. As this is part of a roof replacement, you will need to do calculations on the thermal properties as well as look at additional insulation in the existing roof. Unless you have a roofer that can self certify the work, building control will probably need to be consulted (might even need planning permission too).
    Her courage will change the world.

    Treasure the moments that you have. Savour them for as long as you can for they will never come back again.
    • a.turner
    • By a.turner 17th May 19, 5:42 PM
    • 113 Posts
    • 78 Thanks
    a.turner
    • #3
    • 17th May 19, 5:42 PM
    • #3
    • 17th May 19, 5:42 PM
    Depending of the size of your roof joists you may need a whole new roof.
    • savemoney
    • By savemoney 17th May 19, 6:44 PM
    • 13,016 Posts
    • 11,613 Thanks
    savemoney
    • #4
    • 17th May 19, 6:44 PM
    • #4
    • 17th May 19, 6:44 PM
    I didn't have any in roof we had two 2mx1.5 roof lanterns but we did require one in the opening from kitchen to integral garage. We needed a new roof went from epdm to fibreglass and stronger timbers though. The roof also had ply rather than previously osb3. Ours was only recently finished, the skypods look amazing and let tons of light in. In fact I dont know why people want a conservatory these are far better and usable room in Winter if you have good insulation


    Also great when it rains and all dirt runs off when it rains properly that is



    https://i.postimg.cc/Fz3NFqnm/20190517-194220-1.jpg
    Last edited by savemoney; 17-05-2019 at 6:48 PM.
    • Davesnave
    • By Davesnave 18th May 19, 7:31 AM
    • 28,120 Posts
    • 99,464 Thanks
    Davesnave
    • #5
    • 18th May 19, 7:31 AM
    • #5
    • 18th May 19, 7:31 AM
    . In fact I dont know why people want a conservatory these are far better and usable room in Winter if you have good insulation.
    Originally posted by savemoney
    They look a very good alternative, but don't assume all conservatories are unusable in winter just because they have glass roofs. Mine is more use then than in summer, and the net heat gain to the house makes it doubly worthwhile on reasonably sunny days.
    'I've suffered for my music, now it's your turn.' Neil Innes, introducing 'Protest Song.'
    • theGrinch
    • By theGrinch 18th May 19, 7:55 AM
    • 2,946 Posts
    • 699 Thanks
    theGrinch
    • #6
    • 18th May 19, 7:55 AM
    • #6
    • 18th May 19, 7:55 AM
    You may need a whole new roof and steel frame as a neighbour did
    "enough is a feast"...old Buddist proverb
    • happyhero
    • By happyhero 18th May 19, 8:42 AM
    • 1,186 Posts
    • 56 Thanks
    happyhero
    • #7
    • 18th May 19, 8:42 AM
    • #7
    • 18th May 19, 8:42 AM
    Thanks guys, yes I want a whole new roof anyway, the old one is very old and there wont be much of it left anyway so may aswell renew the lot. I am thinking all new timbers maybe bigger and a warm roof where there is roof.


    I think I'll have to pick the right glass as I dont want it to cook us inside but I've read some stuff about it being cold in winter. I seem to have got conflicting information when it comes to this so it does concern me.


    I'm hoping with the rest of the roof being a warm roof and the latest thermally insulated aluminium lantern it wont be that bad or noticeable in the winter.


    Any of you had experience with one of these in winter?


    I'm not sure what glass I should pick yet that does a good job, any ideas?
    • a.turner
    • By a.turner 18th May 19, 11:46 AM
    • 113 Posts
    • 78 Thanks
    a.turner
    • #8
    • 18th May 19, 11:46 AM
    • #8
    • 18th May 19, 11:46 AM
    Don't get too hung up on a warm roof being any warmer than a cold roof, it's just the way it's constructed.

    Five winters on and I can't say I've experienced it being cold due a roof lantern.
    • ed110220
    • By ed110220 18th May 19, 12:26 PM
    • 1,158 Posts
    • 619 Thanks
    ed110220
    • #9
    • 18th May 19, 12:26 PM
    • #9
    • 18th May 19, 12:26 PM
    I don't think it's safe to assume that just because the lantern weighs less than the roofing materials it is replacing that it's OK to install without strengthening or even a new roof structure as cutting a 4 X 2m hole in the roof may well compromise its structural integrity.

    Warm roof refers to the insulation being above the roof structure so the roof itself is warm while cold roof refers to a more traditional roof in which the insulation is below the roof (eg loft insulation sitting on the ceiling) so the roof structure is cold. Either can offer good insulation and keep the room below warm.
Welcome to our new Forum!

Our aim is to save you money quickly and easily. We hope you like it!

Forum Team Contact us

Live Stats

2,206Posts Today

6,295Users online

Martin's Twitter