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  • FIRST POST
    • tonygold
    • By tonygold 16th May 19, 11:11 AM
    • 699Posts
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    tonygold
    SSD capacity question
    • #1
    • 16th May 19, 11:11 AM
    SSD capacity question 16th May 19 at 11:11 AM
    just fitted a Crucial 480GB MX500 SSD to my laptop. makes the whole experience so much better - faster response to opening programs etc.

    one question: in 'my computer' when right clicking on the SSD the capacity is shown as only 430GB. is that right? or is that the capacity not including the operating system that i cloned over (windows 10 home 64 bit)?

    many thanks.
Page 1
    • Johnmcl7
    • By Johnmcl7 16th May 19, 11:21 AM
    • 2,559 Posts
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    Johnmcl7
    • #2
    • 16th May 19, 11:21 AM
    • #2
    • 16th May 19, 11:21 AM
    The hard drive and solid state manufacturers usually measure the capacity in a different way to the operating system, the manufacturers calculate a gigabyte as 1000000000 bytes whereas the operating system calculates one GB as 1073741824 bytes. This means a hard drive or solid state drive will usually show a lower capacity within the operating system.
    • tonygold
    • By tonygold 16th May 19, 11:26 AM
    • 699 Posts
    • 247 Thanks
    tonygold
    • #3
    • 16th May 19, 11:26 AM
    • #3
    • 16th May 19, 11:26 AM
    The hard drive and solid state manufacturers usually measure the capacity in a different way to the operating system, the manufacturers calculate a gigabyte as 1000000000 bytes whereas the operating system calculates one GB as 1073741824 bytes. This means a hard drive or solid state drive will usually show a lower capacity within the operating system.
    Originally posted by Johnmcl7
    thanks john but this is just over 10% lower than stated capacity. just checking if that is about right?
    • debitcardmayhem
    • By debitcardmayhem 16th May 19, 11:38 AM
    • 9,011 Posts
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    debitcardmayhem
    • #4
    • 16th May 19, 11:38 AM
    • #4
    • 16th May 19, 11:38 AM
    What does disk management say ? (right click on the windows icon on the task bar)
    Still grumpy, and No, Cloudflare I am NOT a robot
    • stragglebod
    • By stragglebod 16th May 19, 11:46 AM
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    stragglebod
    • #5
    • 16th May 19, 11:46 AM
    • #5
    • 16th May 19, 11:46 AM
    If you cloned the old disk it probably also cloned over the hidden partition that stores the factory restore image. So that'll reduce the space available on your C drive.
    • DoaM
    • By DoaM 16th May 19, 11:52 AM
    • 6,856 Posts
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    DoaM
    • #6
    • 16th May 19, 11:52 AM
    • #6
    • 16th May 19, 11:52 AM
    My Samsung 500GB SSD shows in Windows as ~465GB ... ~7% reduction. (Clean install, not a clone of an existing disk).
    Diary of a madman
    Walk the line again today
    Entries of confusion
    Dear diary, I'm here to stay
    • tonygold
    • By tonygold 16th May 19, 11:55 AM
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    tonygold
    • #7
    • 16th May 19, 11:55 AM
    • #7
    • 16th May 19, 11:55 AM
    thanks for replies. i'm glad now i didn't go for the 256GB option as i would have had very little space left. as it is i am still showing 150GB of free space so that will last me. i keep my music on an external drive and could do the same with my pictures also i suppose.
    • almillar
    • By almillar 16th May 19, 12:42 PM
    • 7,846 Posts
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    almillar
    • #8
    • 16th May 19, 12:42 PM
    • #8
    • 16th May 19, 12:42 PM
    As well as the 8 byte problem, Windows likely has a small system partition hidden from you. If you follow debitcardmayhem's advice, you should see your disk with the big 430GB partition, and a small (500MB?) partition.
    • tonygold
    • By tonygold 16th May 19, 12:49 PM
    • 699 Posts
    • 247 Thanks
    tonygold
    • #9
    • 16th May 19, 12:49 PM
    • #9
    • 16th May 19, 12:49 PM
    As well as the 8 byte problem, Windows likely has a small system partition hidden from you. If you follow debitcardmayhem's advice, you should see your disk with the big 430GB partition, and a small (500MB?) partition.
    Originally posted by almillar

    thank you.
    in disk management the following are listed:
    260MB EFI System partition
    430.79GB NTFS C:
    958MB Primary Partition
    33.66GB Recovery Primary Partition

    all are showing as 'healthy'.

    many thanks for the assistance.
    • Neil Jones
    • By Neil Jones 16th May 19, 1:03 PM
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    Neil Jones
    My Samsung 500GB SSD shows in Windows as ~465GB ... ~7% reduction. (Clean install, not a clone of an existing disk).
    Originally posted by DoaM
    It's not a 7% reduction at all. The issue with hard drive capacities that are smaller than the label comes about because they are manufactured as an unformatted capacity and are due to rounding.

    Potted history lesson - 8 bits in a byte, 1024 byes is 1 kilobyte. 1024 Kiloboytes = 1 megabyte, 1024 megabytes is 1 Gigabyte.

    So: 500GB = 500,000,000,000 (bytes) / (1024*1024*1024) = 465.66 GB.

    For a 480Gb the same calculation comes out as 447.03Gb, so presumably the OP has cloned an existing partition. Sometimes what happens is in a straight clone if the original partition was smaller it can get enlarged, which I think is what's happened as that system partition in Windows 10 is typically only 100Mb IIRC so they all get upsized.
    • grumpycrab
    • By grumpycrab 16th May 19, 1:23 PM
    • 4,100 Posts
    • 1,974 Thanks
    grumpycrab
    in disk management the following are listed:
    260MB EFI System partition
    430.79GB NTFS C:
    958MB Primary Partition
    33.66GB Recovery Primary Partition
    Originally posted by tonygold
    A clean install would have done ...a clean install and not "wasted" space with a 34GB recovery partition. There's no need for a recovery partition these days - Windows10 (I assume this is what you have!) is so easy to (re) install. Obviously, you would have had to backup documents and any installed program keys first.
    If you put your general location in your Profile, somebody here may be able to come and help you.
    • DoaM
    • By DoaM 16th May 19, 3:47 PM
    • 6,856 Posts
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    DoaM
    It's not a 7% reduction at all.
    Originally posted by Neil Jones
    Is 465 less than 500? Yes? Then it's a reduction (versus the stated capacity).

    I know how bits and bytes work, and how disk manufacturers specify capacity, thanks.
    Diary of a madman
    Walk the line again today
    Entries of confusion
    Dear diary, I'm here to stay
    • Neil Jones
    • By Neil Jones 17th May 19, 8:32 AM
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    Neil Jones
    Is 465 less than 500? Yes? Then it's a reduction (versus the stated capacity).

    I know how bits and bytes work, and how disk manufacturers specify capacity, thanks.
    Originally posted by DoaM
    Contrary to how it might have looked the post wasn't purely for your benefit.
    • almillar
    • By almillar 17th May 19, 11:50 AM
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    almillar
    thank you.
    in disk management the following are listed:
    260MB EFI System partition
    430.79GB NTFS C:
    958MB Primary Partition
    33.66GB Recovery Primary Partition
    So: 500GB = 500,000,000,000 (bytes) / (1024*1024*1024) = 465.66 GB.

    For a 480Gb the same calculation comes out as 447.03Gb,
    Excellent, so your 480Gbyte drive is 447 in the sortof decimal way. Take off the 0.260Gb EFI and 0.958GB 'Primary Partition (I'm not sure what that is), and the 33.66GB recovery partition, and we end up with 445.122Gb - much closer to the 430GB you're being quoted.
    We're still 15Gb out, but I'm not going to waste my time trying to reconcile that, and neither should you. A difference that small CAN be put down to 1024bytes vs 1000bytes that DoaM referenced.

    If you need more disk space, look into getting rid of that 30 odd Gb recovery partition. You can delete the partition and expand your 430 one into it, with files intact.
    • AndyPix
    • By AndyPix 17th May 19, 1:01 PM
    • 4,255 Posts
    • 3,745 Thanks
    AndyPix
    So: 500GB = 500,000,000,000 (bytes).
    Originally posted by Neil Jones

    Yes but it doesnt though does it .


    As we both know, 500GB = 536,870,912,000 bytes ..
    So why are the drive manufacturers allowed to sell something with less capacity as '500GB'
    Last edited by AndyPix; 17-05-2019 at 1:23 PM.
    Running with scissors since 1978
    • Neil Jones
    • By Neil Jones 17th May 19, 1:23 PM
    • 2,070 Posts
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    Neil Jones
    Yes but it doesnt though does it .


    As we both know, 5GB = 536,870,912,000 bytes ..
    So why are the drive manufacturers allowed to sell something with less capacity as '500GB'
    Originally posted by AndyPix
    500Gb unformatted capacity.

    Issue came about because somebody in the past decided it would be more consumer friendly to sell the drives by selling them in Base 10 format as opposed to Base 2, and back then you were doing well to have a hard drive in three digit Megabyte formats so you weren't actually losing much.

    Of course as the drive sizes crept up the discrepancy increased, and now a 3Tb drive only comes up as 2.69Tb. It might be considered lame by todays standards but technically it is correct.

    Apparently Apple "fixed" this in iOS 11 and whatever followed Leopard as a MacOS so a 1Tb drive actually comes up as a 1Tb drive and not 931Gb.
    • tonygold
    • By tonygold 18th May 19, 7:01 AM
    • 699 Posts
    • 247 Thanks
    tonygold
    Excellent, so your 480Gbyte drive is 447 in the sortof decimal way. Take off the 0.260Gb EFI and 0.958GB 'Primary Partition (I'm not sure what that is), and the 33.66GB recovery partition, and we end up with 445.122Gb - much closer to the 430GB you're being quoted.
    We're still 15Gb out, but I'm not going to waste my time trying to reconcile that, and neither should you. A difference that small CAN be put down to 1024bytes vs 1000bytes that DoaM referenced.

    If you need more disk space, look into getting rid of that 30 odd Gb recovery partition. You can delete the partition and expand your 430 one into it, with files intact.
    Originally posted by almillar
    many thanks almillar for your detailed explanation. i am not desperate for additional storage space so will not delete the recovery partition. out of interest, if i needed to, how would i access and / or use this recovery partition?

    many thanks again.
    • Neil Jones
    • By Neil Jones 18th May 19, 7:52 AM
    • 2,070 Posts
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    Neil Jones
    many thanks almillar for your detailed explanation. i am not desperate for additional storage space so will not delete the recovery partition. out of interest, if i needed to, how would i access and / or use this recovery partition?

    many thanks again.
    Originally posted by tonygold

    Normally you would either hold down a key during startup (typically F9 or F11) and then get to it that way. However that tends to break when you copy the drive to a new one so it may be arbitrary anyway.

    All it basically means is if you can't get to it you lose access to the bulk of the preinstalled software which I dare say most people don't use anyway. The important stuff you can get from the manufacturer's website.
    • tonygold
    • By tonygold 18th May 19, 7:58 AM
    • 699 Posts
    • 247 Thanks
    tonygold
    Normally you would either hold down a key during startup (typically F9 or F11) and then get to it that way. However that tends to break when you copy the drive to a new one so it may be arbitrary anyway.

    All it basically means is if you can't get to it you lose access to the bulk of the preinstalled software which I dare say most people don't use anyway. The important stuff you can get from the manufacturer's website.
    Originally posted by Neil Jones
    thank you Neil
    • Frozen_up_north
    • By Frozen_up_north 18th May 19, 8:41 AM
    • 1,860 Posts
    • 946 Thanks
    Frozen_up_north
    A recovery partition isn’t much use these days. It will contain the “years old” Windows version and games/AV junk that came originally. Doing a restore will get you back to square one and take days to bring up to where you are now.

    Keep a regular “full” backup of your current installation on an external drive and you won’t need a recovery partition.

    BTW, you can put a removed laptop hard drive into a USB powered pocket size case for backups, or as carry around extra storage. The housing I recently bought is item 191632943581 from eBay (UK shipped Orico housing, currently listed at £7.79).
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