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  • FIRST POST
    • JackeeBoy
    • By JackeeBoy 13th May 19, 3:26 PM
    • 111Posts
    • 42Thanks
    JackeeBoy
    Is there a bonafide way to stop cats and foxes coming into my garden?
    • #1
    • 13th May 19, 3:26 PM
    Is there a bonafide way to stop cats and foxes coming into my garden? 13th May 19 at 3:26 PM
    It's one of the main things stopping me from enjoying my garden. It's now especially more disgusting now that I have artificial grass. I have tried using the sound blasters etc., but cats keep coming in and I swear then pick on my garden. I just wish owners were more considerate and kept their bloody pests inside.

    I have put spikes around on the fence and though it did initially deter them from using certain entry points, the always find a way around or just get used to it. What can I do?

    The only thing I can think of is getting very high fences (I can currently see over mine) and putting prison-style barbedwire all over.
Page 2
    • JackeeBoy
    • By JackeeBoy 14th May 19, 12:54 PM
    • 111 Posts
    • 42 Thanks
    JackeeBoy
    What an appalling suggestion. What is wrong with you that you would risk killing pets simply because you don't like them in your garden?

    You accuse cat owners of being inconsiderate, while talking about poisoning peoples pets like a psychopath. You couldn't make it up!
    Originally posted by Rusty Shackleton
    Would you be so appalled if we were talking about mice, ants or cockroaches? No, you wouldn't.
    • ed110220
    • By ed110220 14th May 19, 12:59 PM
    • 1,158 Posts
    • 619 Thanks
    ed110220
    It's not inconsiderate of cat owners to let cats exhibit natural behaviours like roaming outside and hunting, the inconsideration is from people who expect the world to fit around them just so their garden is neater and tidier. Do you have a problem with the birds that invariably poo in your garden?

    You're complaining about foxes too, who's 'consideration' do you think would solve that one? The good news is that foxes generally don't like cats, so the cats might be helping you in that regard at least!

    If you have this much problem with wildlife, I'd suggest you'd be better of staying indoors.
    Originally posted by Rusty Shackleton
    I think it's very inconsiderate to keep an animal that causes problems for other people. Cat owners only really get away with it because it's always been done, but it wouldn't be tolerated with another, new type of pet. If I were to get a lesser Patagonian bandysnatch and it went !!!!ping all over the neighbours' gardens, killing birds etc I'm sure it would be looked at differently. Wild animals are different as no one owns them.

    As to keeping them out, I've heard stretching a wire above the top of a fence keeps them out if the correct height as they can't sit on the top of it.
    • Stratus
    • By Stratus 14th May 19, 1:03 PM
    • 115 Posts
    • 65 Thanks
    Stratus
    You might find you suddenly get a rodent problem if all your neighbors got rid of the cats.


    I live in a rural area and a stream runs down the back of the houses on my lane, my neighbor hates cats but is still very grateful I have them as we don't have a rodent problem anymore due to them!
    Originally posted by Tammykitty
    Your evidence is just anecdotal.

    Here's some scientific evidence which contradicts your assertion:
    https://wildlife.org/rats-feral-cats-fail-at-urban-rodent-control/
    • Ant555
    • By Ant555 14th May 19, 1:09 PM
    • 954 Posts
    • 396 Thanks
    Ant555
    I had a problem with an animal (either cat or fox, never really worked out) using my front garden as a loo for a good while - really disgusting mess left regularly.

    I bought some cat repellent spray from Wilkos and it worked great, first application though was intensely smelly as, I think, it had garlic in it. As this was outside, it didnt really matter too much, I kept the spray bottle down the side of my house and gave the grass and the front paving stones a very quick spray every now and then - my thoughts were that their noses were far better than mine so a quick top up would be quite intense for them.

    As I said, this worked an absolute treat and it stopped very quickly HOWEVER, I dont think they sell it any more (certainly not the garlick-y one) but my recommendation would be to see if you can google and fins something similar.

    hope this helps.
    • Tammykitty
    • By Tammykitty 14th May 19, 1:19 PM
    • 768 Posts
    • 1,559 Thanks
    Tammykitty
    Your evidence is just anecdotal.

    Here's some scientific evidence which contradicts your assertion:
    https://wildlife.org/rats-feral-cats-fail-at-urban-rodent-control/
    Originally posted by Stratus

    Did you actually read your own link - they make limited impact on large rat populations in cities and prefer smaller prey (mice?)

    Also although the cats only killed 2 rats -
    "As the researchers report in their study, a one percent increase in the number of cats on a given day made it 100 times less likely that a rat would trigger the team’s motion-sensitive cameras"

    Therefore the presence of the cat changes a rats behavior as they stay away from the cat (and therefore out of your garden if the cat is in it!)


    https://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/cats-are-surprisingly-ineffective-keeping-urban-rat-populations-check-180970428/


    My cats have a mouse that I see about once a week and none of the houses have had a mouse problem since I got the cats - and there was mice problems previously.


    https://www.victorpest.com/articles/will-getting-a-cat-get-rid-of-mice


    Mice don't even like the smell of cats
    • Rusty Shackleton
    • By Rusty Shackleton 14th May 19, 1:29 PM
    • 428 Posts
    • 640 Thanks
    Rusty Shackleton
    Would you be so appalled if we were talking about mice, ants or cockroaches? No, you wouldn't.
    Originally posted by JackeeBoy
    I absolutely would be appalled if anyone caused any of those animals a needless slow, painful death, and that's what rat poison would do an animal the size of a cat. You'd also be depriving someone of a loved pet. I take it from your callous attitude towards others' pets that you don't have pets of your own?

    I think it's very inconsiderate to keep an animal that causes problems for other people.
    Yeah, cats have been in the UK for thousands of years and can survive quite happily in the wild. If everyone stopped having pet cats you'd still have an abundant cat population. Given the public's attitude towards fox hunting, I very much doubt you'd find much support for culling cats.

    I can understand if cats mess in your garden wanting to try methods to deter them, but no reasonable person would seriously consider causing them harm!
    • ariba10
    • By ariba10 14th May 19, 1:50 PM
    • 5,230 Posts
    • 5,737 Thanks
    ariba10
    We have a dog and have no problem with cats coming in to the garden!
    I used to be indecisive but now I am not sure.
    • Stratus
    • By Stratus 14th May 19, 2:49 PM
    • 115 Posts
    • 65 Thanks
    Stratus
    If only cat owners would train their pets

    [IMG][/IMG]
    • Fire Fox
    • By Fire Fox 15th May 19, 11:17 AM
    • 24,632 Posts
    • 28,514 Thanks
    Fire Fox
    It's one of the main things stopping me from enjoying my garden. It's now especially more disgusting now that I have artificial grass. I have tried using the sound blasters etc., but cats keep coming in and I swear then pick on my garden. I just wish owners were more considerate and kept their bloody pests inside.

    I have put spikes around on the fence and though it did initially deter them from using certain entry points, the always find a way around or just get used to it. What can I do?

    The only thing I can think of is getting very high fences (I can currently see over mine) and putting prison-style barbedwire all over.
    Originally posted by JackeeBoy
    Perhaps the animals in question think plastic grass is disgusting, so are voting with their bums.

    There are recent threads on this topic if you run an advanced search. Spikes are intended for specific creatures - eg. human intruders/ pigeons - try a proper cat-proofing system.

    I don't see the logic of making antagonistic or inflammatory comments when you are seeking targeted advice. Many of the people who know most about keeping such animals in or out (same basic principle) are animal lovers themselves.
    Declutterbug-in-progress.⭐️⭐️⭐️ ⭐️ Trainee Rosie the Riveter.
    • Fire Fox
    • By Fire Fox 15th May 19, 12:09 PM
    • 24,632 Posts
    • 28,514 Thanks
    Fire Fox
    I think it's very inconsiderate to keep an animal that causes problems for other people. Cat owners only really get away with it because it's always been done, but it wouldn't be tolerated with another, new type of pet. If I were to get a lesser Patagonian bandysnatch and it went !!!!ping all over the neighbours' gardens, killing birds etc I'm sure it would be looked at differently. Wild animals are different as no one owns them.
    Originally posted by ed110220
    Plenty of domestic dogs cause problems: barking or whining, pooping in the street and parks, sheep worrying, killing fawns and other wildlife. Yet it remains socially acceptable to let them off the lead.

    Plenty of children screech and run riot on public transport, in shops and eateries, trespass and cause damage. Yet it remains socially acceptable to eschew contraception.

    Self centred and inconsiderate guardianship is not limited to pets.
    Declutterbug-in-progress.⭐️⭐️⭐️ ⭐️ Trainee Rosie the Riveter.
    • Jackmydad
    • By Jackmydad 15th May 19, 12:58 PM
    • 5,799 Posts
    • 19,186 Thanks
    Jackmydad
    Your evidence is just anecdotal.

    Here's some scientific evidence which contradicts your assertion:
    https://wildlife.org/rats-feral-cats-fail-at-urban-rodent-control/
    Originally posted by Stratus
    Did you actually read your own link - they make limited impact on large rat populations in cities and prefer smaller prey (mice?)

    Also although the cats only killed 2 rats -
    "As the researchers report in their study, a one percent increase in the number of cats on a given day made it 100 times less likely that a rat would trigger the teamís motion-sensitive cameras"

    Therefore the presence of the cat changes a rats behavior as they stay away from the cat (and therefore out of your garden if the cat is in it!)


    https://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/cats-are-surprisingly-ineffective-keeping-urban-rat-populations-check-180970428/


    My cats have a mouse that I see about once a week and none of the houses have had a mouse problem since I got the cats - and there was mice problems previously.


    https://www.victorpest.com/articles/will-getting-a-cat-get-rid-of-mice


    Mice don't even like the smell of cats
    Originally posted by Tammykitty
    Not all cats will tackle a rat in my experience. They vary as hunters in general as well.
    We've had a couple who would take rats regularly, and bring them back dead, the one in particular would lay them out as grisly trophies. The others we've had didn't seem as interested, but would catch mice.
    Fortunately none of our cats have shown much interest in birds.
    Whatever the case, cats are part of the world we live in. If you don't want them in your garden, then do something to keep them out of it that doesn't cause them harm.
    • ed110220
    • By ed110220 15th May 19, 2:21 PM
    • 1,158 Posts
    • 619 Thanks
    ed110220
    Plenty of domestic dogs cause problems: barking or whining, pooping in the street and parks, sheep worrying, killing fawns and other wildlife. Yet it remains socially acceptable to let them off the lead.

    Plenty of children screech and run riot on public transport, in shops and eateries, trespass and cause damage. Yet it remains socially acceptable to eschew contraception.

    Self centred and inconsiderate guardianship is not limited to pets.
    Originally posted by Fire Fox
    Just because a certain number of people let their dogs and children run wild doesn't mean it's generally considered acceptable. It's not acceptable to let your dog attack farm animals, other dogs or people or to let it foul other people's or public property. It's not generally considered acceptable to leave a dog alone at home all day if that causes it to bark incessantly or to let it off its lead in public if it's not well trained enough to not cause damage or injury.
    • Fire Fox
    • By Fire Fox 15th May 19, 3:07 PM
    • 24,632 Posts
    • 28,514 Thanks
    Fire Fox
    I think it's very inconsiderate to keep an animal that causes problems for other people. Cat owners only really get away with it because it's always been done, but it wouldn't be tolerated with another, new type of pet. If I were to get a lesser Patagonian bandysnatch and it went !!!!ping all over the neighbours' gardens, killing birds etc I'm sure it would be looked at differently.
    Originally posted by ed110220
    Just because a certain number of people let their dogs and children run wild doesn't mean it's generally considered acceptable. It's not acceptable to let your dog attack farm animals, other dogs or people or to let it foul other people's or public property. It's not generally considered acceptable to leave a dog alone at home all day if that causes it to bark incessantly or to let it off its lead in public if it's not well trained enough to not cause damage or injury.
    Originally posted by ed110220
    So you agree that children should be seen and not heard when in public? And you think all dogs should remain on a lead at all times in consideration of those who are are frightened of, allergic to or strongly dislike dogs?

    Self centred and inconsiderate guardianship is subjective not objective.
    Declutterbug-in-progress.⭐️⭐️⭐️ ⭐️ Trainee Rosie the Riveter.
    • andrewf75
    • By andrewf75 15th May 19, 3:09 PM
    • 8,908 Posts
    • 15,448 Thanks
    andrewf75
    Cat owners only really get away with it because it's always been done, but it wouldn't be tolerated with another, new type of pet. If I were to get a lesser Patagonian bandysnatch and it went !!!!ping all over the neighbours' gardens, killing birds etc I'm sure it would be looked at differently. Wild animals are different as no one owns them.
    .
    Originally posted by ed110220
    This is so true. I like cats and while I donít make a big deal of my neighbours cats pooing in my veg beds, it is wrong in principle that an animal can be kept as a pet but allowed to roam around.
    • Mrs Arthur Crown
    • By Mrs Arthur Crown 15th May 19, 3:24 PM
    • 67 Posts
    • 44 Thanks
    Mrs Arthur Crown
    Is it not the case that cats are technically "wild animals" in law, and therefore no-one (including their owners) can do a great deal about any annoyances they cause. There are laws regarding dogs wandering around with no owners but the same is not the case with cats (don't ask me why, but I bet someone on here will know).

    This is also the reason why you don't have to report it if you run over and kill a cat, but can be fined if you run over and kill a dog (or a variety of other, mostly farm, animals). Of course, if you were a nice person you would of course try and find the owner and let them know, but from a legal point of view, it's not necessary.

    Back to the original question, I am a big fan of super-soakers. Keeps the local felines wary. Just need a way to get rid of the 17+ magpies who congregate in the vicinity and have scared away (or killed) all the little garden birds over the years.
    Last edited by Mrs Arthur Crown; 15-05-2019 at 3:26 PM. Reason: Missed a bit
    • Rusty Shackleton
    • By Rusty Shackleton 15th May 19, 3:44 PM
    • 428 Posts
    • 640 Thanks
    Rusty Shackleton
    Back to the original question, I am a big fan of super-soakers.
    Originally posted by Mrs Arthur Crown
    Spraying cats with water is not an effective deterrent from them entering your garden, what you're teaching the cat is to avoid your garden when you're there.

    Rather than try and soak the cat, find something (like others have suggested) that they don't like the smell of, or a gadget that will always respond to the cats presence, even if you're not there.
    • Rusty Shackleton
    • By Rusty Shackleton 15th May 19, 3:49 PM
    • 428 Posts
    • 640 Thanks
    Rusty Shackleton
    it is wrong in principle that an animal can be kept as a pet but allowed to roam around.
    Originally posted by andrewf75
    Why is it? Like I've said above, if every cat owner ceased to have a pet cat (without just releasing them into the wild), there is still the matter of cats successfully living wild in the UK. What difference does it make whether some of them are peoples pets or not?

    Arguably, all those pet cats mean less birds get hunted, since pet cats are fed and don't hunt nearly as much as those that need to in order to survive. Feral cats are competing with pet cats for territory, so pet cats are doing wild birds a favour at least. Similarly, all those neutered pet males aren't spraying all over your garden... would you prefer more feral males in your area?!
    • robatwork
    • By robatwork 15th May 19, 7:55 PM
    • 5,113 Posts
    • 5,874 Thanks
    robatwork
    Rotating poles on top of your fences?

    https://www.catpolesystems.co.uk/
    • lessonlearned
    • By lessonlearned 16th May 19, 3:32 AM
    • 11,474 Posts
    • 78,794 Thanks
    lessonlearned
    Bottles of water placed at strategic points. Cat sees its reflection and thinks it's another cat and is scared off.
    • troffasky
    • By troffasky 16th May 19, 3:16 PM
    • 145 Posts
    • 81 Thanks
    troffasky
    Just need a way to get rid of the 17+ magpies who congregate in the vicinity and have scared away (or killed) all the little garden birds over the years.
    Originally posted by Mrs Arthur Crown

    Once you've got rid of the magpies, what next? I don't think we should be "picking winners" when it comes to wild animals. Fans of caterpillars, flies and worms will be wanting rid of 'little garden birds' once you've had your way with magpies.
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