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  • FIRST POST
    • alanshave
    • By alanshave 9th Apr 19, 8:33 PM
    • 404Posts
    • 376Thanks
    alanshave
    Help with Weeds!
    • #1
    • 9th Apr 19, 8:33 PM
    Help with Weeds! 9th Apr 19 at 8:33 PM
    I had our garden areas landscaped last year, at a fairly decent expense.

    The local landscaper, someone highly regarded online and with all the right accreditations and work guarantees, promised me a low maintenance solution.

    Part of the landscaping is stone chippings running alongside the driveway.

    Within the last year they've developed a notable amount (and variety) of weeds! I've tried killing them once with typical weedkiller and then hand weeding after a few days once the weeds had wilted, but in no time I was back to square one.

    So being fairly clueless to this, I need your opinion and help!

    1. Am I unfair to think this isn't what I expected and for the landscaper to fix it? He claims that nothing can be done because I live near a road so it's natural. I saw them lay down membrane first, so its not as though they skipped that step.

    2. If it's something I can deal with myself. What's the best method for lasting results and can I do it without killing the 'buxom balls'?

    https://photos.app.goo.gl/nDa7HrJtLMpMP3Vm7

    https://photos.app.goo.gl/28tn4dbN8bYdY8TE8
    Last edited by alanshave; 09-04-2019 at 8:35 PM. Reason: Add picture links.
Page 1
    • unrecordings
    • By unrecordings 10th Apr 19, 6:10 AM
    • 677 Posts
    • 1,101 Thanks
    unrecordings
    • #2
    • 10th Apr 19, 6:10 AM
    • #2
    • 10th Apr 19, 6:10 AM
    A simple flame gun is my weapon of choice, although you have to be careful where you point it of course - and its not necessarily going to do your membrane much good (I don't use the stuff)
    Why am I in this handcart and where are we going ?
    • Justagardener
    • By Justagardener 10th Apr 19, 7:12 AM
    • 181 Posts
    • 161 Thanks
    Justagardener
    • #3
    • 10th Apr 19, 7:12 AM
    • #3
    • 10th Apr 19, 7:12 AM
    The landscaper has done everything right, membranes only stop old perennial weeds coming through. Membranes with gravel on top actually provide a perfectly protected germination area for weeds to grow. Unfortunately you will never be able to prevent this.
    Just keep a little spray bottle of weed killer handy and don't let the weeds take hold. I find Neudorff weed killer very successful and fast.
    • -taff
    • By -taff 10th Apr 19, 8:57 AM
    • 9,903 Posts
    • 12,773 Thanks
    -taff
    • #4
    • 10th Apr 19, 8:57 AM
    • #4
    • 10th Apr 19, 8:57 AM
    I have a single thickness of good weed membrane down in the front garden and my weed problem comes from [mostly] cornflower seeds blowing into any dirt that gets blown and trapped in the gravel, along with a few spots of couch grass that pop up and some errant muscaria from seeds blown. I did this two years ago.

    My weed problem is nowhere as bad as your pictures, I pull maybe a half bucketful in total a year, if that, but I dug out every bit of weed I found before I put the membrane down.
    Did they? Because if they left roots intact things will sprout. I would not expect that many weeds after only one year and certainly not in the same year. If the grass spots have grown that much there's either a lot of dirt in the gravel, which is possible, or you have unusually fertile seeds. I noticed you have mares tail in there and couch grass, it's possible they've grown through the membrane, and both are a swine to get rid of.
    Are the grass clumps easy to pull out? You've also got hawkweed in there which can quickly grow to colonise an area, I know, because I deliberately planted it in the front garden in the border [ because I like it] but it certainly made it's presence felt within short order nd I had to dig a bit of it out.
    Last edited by -taff; 10-04-2019 at 9:04 AM.
    • FabFifty
    • By FabFifty 10th Apr 19, 9:24 AM
    • 95 Posts
    • 137 Thanks
    FabFifty
    • #5
    • 10th Apr 19, 9:24 AM
    • #5
    • 10th Apr 19, 9:24 AM
    We use rock salt to keep weeds at bay. Preferably sprinkled before rain is due so it soaks in fairly quickly rather than just sitting on the top of the stone chippings. Just be aware it will also kill off any plants so only throw around in areas where it's weedy.
    • Ebe Scrooge
    • By Ebe Scrooge 10th Apr 19, 11:47 AM
    • 4,203 Posts
    • 3,672 Thanks
    Ebe Scrooge
    • #6
    • 10th Apr 19, 11:47 AM
    • #6
    • 10th Apr 19, 11:47 AM
    All of the above advice is sound. If it's really getting to be a pain, one solution is to remove all the gravel and check that the membrane underneath is still intact. Maybe even put another layer on top of it, then replace the gravel. That should eliminate one potential source.

    It's no small job though - and you don't really want to be raking the gravel off too vigorously, otherwise you'll puncture the membrane (assuming it's currently OK).

    The other thing is to wash the gravel, and remove any soil that's on the membrane. It's always a bit of an uphill struggle, to be honest. With the best will in the world, sand and soil gets blown onto/into the gravel, then seeds get deposited by the wind or bird droppings, and weeds grow. I think once you've established that the membrane underneath is undamaged, and you've got rid of any soil that's accumulated, it's just a case of keeping on top of it with the weedkiller of your choice as and when needed (salt is a good "natural" option, as a FabFifty said - or seawater, if you happen to live right by the coast).
    I may not know much about art, but I know what I like.
    • unrecordings
    • By unrecordings 10th Apr 19, 12:23 PM
    • 677 Posts
    • 1,101 Thanks
    unrecordings
    • #7
    • 10th Apr 19, 12:23 PM
    • #7
    • 10th Apr 19, 12:23 PM
    We use rock salt to keep weeds at bay. Preferably sprinkled before rain is due so it soaks in fairly quickly rather than just sitting on the top of the stone chippings. Just be aware it will also kill off any plants so only throw around in areas where it's weedy.
    Originally posted by FabFifty
    I love this idea. We've a very old gravel drive on an incline
    Why am I in this handcart and where are we going ?
    • Grenage
    • By Grenage 10th Apr 19, 12:28 PM
    • 1,728 Posts
    • 1,626 Thanks
    Grenage
    • #8
    • 10th Apr 19, 12:28 PM
    • #8
    • 10th Apr 19, 12:28 PM
    I'd simply spray with Glyphosate occasionally. You'll never win, it's just keeping the stuff under control.
    • Davesnave
    • By Davesnave 10th Apr 19, 6:53 PM
    • 27,863 Posts
    • 99,004 Thanks
    Davesnave
    • #9
    • 10th Apr 19, 6:53 PM
    • #9
    • 10th Apr 19, 6:53 PM
    Something wasn't done right, but the lanscaper will never admit it.


    We put down a caravan pad some 4 or more years ago now, which was vibrated Mot type1 topped with quality geofabric membrane and then granite chippings. Very few weeds have germinated since on the open areas, despite this being the countryside with a wealth of exciting weeds nearby. I really expected trouble, such as I experience on the drive, but the whole pad has probably had no more than 10minutes of attention since we made it.

    I'm not a fan of using salt, so I cope with weeds using a knapsack sprayer and a variety of weedkillers, but mostly I use glyphosate.

    Used at the right time, the sprayer is accurate and causes no harm to nearby wanted plants. It's possible to buy a cone to fit over the nozzle to cope with situations like the box balls too.
    'I've suffered for my music, now it's your turn.' Neil Innes, introducing 'Protest Song.'
    • unrecordings
    • By unrecordings 10th Apr 19, 8:13 PM
    • 677 Posts
    • 1,101 Thanks
    unrecordings
    Interested to hear why you're not a fan of the salt method
    Why am I in this handcart and where are we going ?
    • Davesnave
    • By Davesnave 11th Apr 19, 12:35 AM
    • 27,863 Posts
    • 99,004 Thanks
    Davesnave
    Interested to hear why you're not a fan of the salt method
    Originally posted by unrecordings
    Salt is a chemical which poisons the ground when it accumulates in quantity; just ask the farmers in places like the Nile Delta.


    Glyphosate breaks down quickly when it hits the soil/water and causes no long term harm, which is why it's the only chemical approved by the Environment Agency for use in waterways.
    'I've suffered for my music, now it's your turn.' Neil Innes, introducing 'Protest Song.'
    • unrecordings
    • By unrecordings 11th Apr 19, 6:13 AM
    • 677 Posts
    • 1,101 Thanks
    unrecordings
    Salt is a chemical which poisons the ground when it accumulates in quantity; just ask the farmers in places like the Nile Delta.


    Glyphosate breaks down quickly when it hits the soil/water and causes no long term harm, which is why it's the only chemical approved by the Environment Agency for use in waterways.
    Originally posted by Davesnave
    Thanks, appreciate that. Thought it might be a good easy solution as my drive is basically just the original sunken front garden filled with rubble & heaven knows what (some 30-60 years ago) topped with a bit of pea gravel

    Edited to add: Back to the flame gun for me then :-)
    Last edited by unrecordings; 11-04-2019 at 7:58 AM.
    Why am I in this handcart and where are we going ?
    • tori.k
    • By tori.k 11th Apr 19, 7:14 AM
    • 3,431 Posts
    • 9,191 Thanks
    tori.k
    As Dave said salt is indiscriminate, when it rains it will leach into the soil and your lose the buxus as a desiccant it will draw moisture from the plant.
    • Farway
    • By Farway 11th Apr 19, 1:18 PM
    • 7,140 Posts
    • 13,280 Thanks
    Farway
    Edited to add: Back to the flame gun for me then :-)
    Originally posted by unrecordings
    And much more fun
    • unrecordings
    • By unrecordings 11th Apr 19, 1:26 PM
    • 677 Posts
    • 1,101 Thanks
    unrecordings
    Indeed - now I know to buy the larger refills instead of the small ones
    Why am I in this handcart and where are we going ?
    • Catsacor
    • By Catsacor 15th Apr 19, 6:03 PM
    • 134 Posts
    • 113 Thanks
    Catsacor
    Salt is a chemical which poisons the ground when it accumulates in quantity; just ask the farmers in places like the Nile Delta.


    Glyphosate breaks down quickly when it hits the soil/water and causes no long term harm, which is why it's the only chemical approved by the Environment Agency for use in waterways.
    Originally posted by Davesnave


    I'm another fan of this, it does the job of eliminating my Equisetum problem aswell as the smaller stuff in my gravelled areas, and it works well.


    I spray regularly/as required and it's all kept under control.
    My favoured one is Resolva Xtra Tough, it's systemic and in my own opinion the best type.
    This company make several versions.
    The Extra Tough is quite dear but worth the investment, I always buy the 3 litre size as it's far more economical.
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