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  • FIRST POST
    • bluenose1
    • By bluenose1 4th Apr 19, 8:57 PM
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    bluenose1
    (NON FINANCIAL) Retirement plans/ dreams/ discussion.
    • #1
    • 4th Apr 19, 8:57 PM
    (NON FINANCIAL) Retirement plans/ dreams/ discussion. 4th Apr 19 at 8:57 PM
    Hi,
    not sure if anyone wants to join in but on Bugslett suggestion thought we could have a thread to discuss lifestyles, hobbies, travel, interests etc etc that we pursue or intend to when we retire.

    I am 2 years and 2 months away from retiring at 55. I change my mind regularly, though at moment hoping to downsize and be on holiday for several months of the year. I wonder after a couple of years of retirement, when my youngest who is 16 is more independent we will choose to base ourselves abroad, Brexit allowing of course.
    I run (very slowly) or volunteer to marshall at a weekly local Parkrun and love the social side of the cake, coffee and chat afterwards. Have met some lovely people from all different walks of life and it always cheers me up.
    Really looking forward to retiring but fear the loss of income in case I need more money to help kids out with more than I thought for deposits on houses etc etc.
    Money SPENDING Expert

Page 5
    • k6chris
    • By k6chris 16th Apr 19, 8:42 PM
    • 411 Posts
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    k6chris
    Over the winter I stupidly entered a 40 mile Ultra, taking place in May. Over the last 6 days I have run 110 km in training. I bloody hate running now
    "For every complicated problem, there is always a simple, wrong answer"
    • MallyGirl
    • By MallyGirl 16th Apr 19, 8:57 PM
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    MallyGirl
    I didn't start running till I did a couch to 5k in my 40s but didn't keep it up. I tried again a couple of years ago but got injured Tried for 3rd time lucky by joining a running club on 4th Jan and was doing OK till I kicked a table with my little toe 3 weeks ago - not even a running injury. I still hope to do my first 10k in a few weeks but haven't managed that distance yet due to not being able to get a shoe on for a while.
    • bluenose1
    • By bluenose1 16th Apr 19, 9:20 PM
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    bluenose1
    I didn't start running until my late 40s really. My PB for 5K Park Run is 31 minutes, and I think that was a week the course was unintentionally too short by about 0.5K as most of the runners got PBs that week.
    My excuse for running slow is I am following the Maffetone method where your heart rate should not exceed 180 minus your heart rate to improve aerobic fitness etc. An added advantage with running slow especially as I am now in my 50s is less injuries.
    I LOVE doing my local Park Run, first couple of times I didn't really talk to anyone but now I often volunteer and always go for a coffee with the group after the run. Met some really nice people from all walks of life.
    Doesn't matter your fitness level, there is always a tail walker who stays at the back. Great start to my weekend and really good for my stress after a week in work.
    Never done a 10k, trying to summon up the courage.
    Money SPENDING Expert

    • k6chris
    • By k6chris 17th Apr 19, 7:25 AM
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    k6chris
    I didn't start running until my late 40s really. My PB for 5K Park Run is 31 minutes, and I think that was a week the course was unintentionally too short by about 0.5K as most of the runners got PBs that week.
    My excuse for running slow is I am following the Maffetone method where your heart rate should not exceed 180 minus your heart rate to improve aerobic fitness etc. An added advantage with running slow especially as I am now in my 50s is less injuries.
    I LOVE doing my local Park Run, first couple of times I didn't really talk to anyone but now I often volunteer and always go for a coffee with the group after the run. Met some really nice people from all walks of life.
    Doesn't matter your fitness level, there is always a tail walker who stays at the back. Great start to my weekend and really good for my stress after a week in work.
    Never done a 10k, trying to summon up the courage.
    Originally posted by bluenose1

    Well done and keep going. 10k is well within your grasp and low heart-rate running is very good for building up distances.



    Parkrun really is for everyone, if anyone is not sure then just find your local one and go along and watch! You can run it, walk it and your dog is welcome! Anyone thinking of taking up running should try the 'Couch to 5K' app, available from the NHS (Google it). Many, many people who "can't run" have discovered they can, that they enjoy it and that it is doing them some good.
    "For every complicated problem, there is always a simple, wrong answer"
    • Marine_life
    • By Marine_life 17th Apr 19, 7:48 AM
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    Marine_life
    My excuse for running slow is I am following the Maffetone method where your heart rate should not exceed 180 minus your heart rate to improve aerobic fitness etc.
    Originally posted by bluenose1
    When I was marathon training I read some guidance that said you shouldn't exceed 70% of your MHR when racing (I had a tendency to go out too fast). I had a heart rate monitor and I set an alarm to go off above 70% ....the alarm was going almost constantly for the first 5km so I switched it off....
    Money won't buy you happiness....but I have rarely if ever been in a situation where more money made things worse!
    • MallyGirl
    • By MallyGirl 17th Apr 19, 9:15 AM
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    MallyGirl
    at my current state of fitness my heart rate rises so rapidly that I wouldn't get above a fast walk if I took that into account. I am hoping it will get better.
    I did a couple of Parkruns some years ago but the timing isn't convenient right now. DD has an activity that starts at 10 so the morning has always been geared up around getting the dogs walked and back for breakfast with her before then. Once she can drive herself or gives up Stagecoach (after 13 years attendance) I will try going again.
    • bugslett
    • By bugslett 17th Apr 19, 9:49 AM
    • 174 Posts
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    bugslett
    Over the winter I stupidly entered a 40 mile Ultra, taking place in May. Over the last 6 days I have run 110 km in training. I bloody hate running now
    Originally posted by k6chris
    On another thread I commented how much our thinking aligns and it does it again.

    I hate running too. Fortunately I arrived at that conclusion before actually doing any.
    Yes I'm bugslet, I lost my original log in details and old e-mail address.
    • Terron
    • By Terron 17th Apr 19, 9:56 AM
    • 402 Posts
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    Terron
    Parkrun really is for everyone, if anyone is not sure then just find your local one and go along and watch! You can run it, walk it and your dog is welcome! Anyone thinking of taking up running should try the 'Couch to 5K' app, available from the NHS (Google it). Many, many people who "can't run" have discovered they can, that they enjoy it and that it is doing them some good.
    Originally posted by k6chris

    It would have to be walk for me. I injured my knee over 10 years ago and it has never fully healed.
    • ex-pat scot
    • By ex-pat scot 17th Apr 19, 11:51 AM
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    ex-pat scot
    I was a big runner in my early 30's with a 10k best of 36:40 and a half marathon of 1:22. But running was a sport I loved to hate. I trained a lot, sometimes twice a day and raced almost every weekend. I was always sore or injured and when my times stopped improving I became disheartened and I eventually gave up running completely.

    I returned briefly in my 40's to tick the box on a marathon (completed in 3:40) and was so disappointed (with my time) that I ran another one three weeks later (in 3:46!), but then gave up again.

    Looking back I wish I have savoured those days. I wish someone had said to me "enjoy this, because its the best you'll ever be". Sometimes in life its almost like we need that outside in view to give us some perspective.

    I started running again last year (at age 53, now 54) and am determined to enjoy it for as long as possible. My knees give me the occasional problem which I can manage by keeping distance below 10k and not running more than two days in succession. Can now run a relatively relaxed 5k in 25 minutes. I may do a park run but at the moment I want to make sure I enjoy every run...who knows how many more there will be.
    Originally posted by Marine_life
    There's a thesis in this thread somewhere - the mindset of the runner, the training required, the deferred gratification of the race, vs planning and saving for pensions!

    I ran modestly in my teens and early twenties, then switched to bike racing, then stopped for 10 years whilst the career, exams, house renovation, marriage and children all came along.
    I hit mid thirties with a feeling of "has been" so started running again, getting faster and culminating with a sub 3 hr marathon a few days before my 40th.
    I lost focus (and a lot of challenge from Mrs XPS) on the running since then - i did quite a few ultras throughout, but for the past few years have been simply ticking over a few times a week with the dog or with colleagues, and the odd 5k /parkrun a few times a year.
    I'm now on the cusp of 50, and like ML am looking back wistfully at my youthful vigour. I feel much more sluggish, and don't do the "hard yards" - the weekly 20 mile long run required for a strong stable base and marathon/ ultra preparation.

    it's easy to blame working patterns for not allowing me the space or focus on fitness, but that's a bit half hearted. I'm still OK at a 5k (I hit 18:40 last summer but usually it's 19 mins) but I'm heavier, older, wheezier and just plain tired all the time. Life is catching up with me and my relentless travel/work schedule.

    I keep saying I will do triathlons and get back into long distance racing (bike / run), but I've done little about it for the last few years. It's one of the things I would really like to get back into properly when I slow down, but I'm about to enter the VM50 category and I suspect it will be when I'm VM55 when I become competitive again!
    • GunJack
    • By GunJack 17th Apr 19, 12:50 PM
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    GunJack
    It would have to be walk for me. I injured my knee over 10 years ago and it has never fully healed.
    Originally posted by Terron
    Can fully sympathise..did mine at 19 and it's screwed with exercise/weight ever since
    ......Gettin' There, Wherever There is......
    • TBC15
    • By TBC15 17th Apr 19, 4:35 PM
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    TBC15
    The only time I ever get above a brisk pace is when Greggs is about to close.

    With this training regime I have suffered no injuries to date.
    • mgdavid
    • By mgdavid 17th Apr 19, 8:38 PM
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    mgdavid
    ..........

    I hate running too. Fortunately I arrived at that conclusion before actually doing any.
    Originally posted by bugslett

    #metoo
    I have never seen the point in risking damaging or wearing out the body prematurely with artificial exercise.. But at 70 I can go up a ladder with a chainsaw, split logs with an axe, and work lying down under the racecar for extended periods just as easily as I could 25 years ago. Every year is a bonus from here.....
    The questions that get the best answers are the questions that give most detail....
    • Techno
    • By Techno 17th Apr 19, 8:51 PM
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    Techno
    DD has an activity that starts at 10 so the morning has always been geared up around getting the dogs walked and back for breakfast with her before then. Once she can drive herself or gives up Stagecoach (after 13 years attendance) I will try going again.
    Originally posted by MallyGirl
    MallyGirl, my dog's morning walk was ParkRun. We would arrive 20mins early so she could do the necessaries and then we would be finished just after half past 9 and on to the rest of the day. Sadly, since Christmas she seems to have 'aged' quite significantly (Weimaraner and almost 11) and the last couple I almost had to drag her along at the end so even though she loves going I think her ParkRun days are over.
    If you think you are too small to make a difference, try getting in bed with a mosquito!
    • MallyGirl
    • By MallyGirl 18th Apr 19, 6:31 AM
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    MallyGirl
    Sadly my dogs love people but the older one is scared of dogs and this has made her fear reactive so we keep away from other dogs. The younger one has just learned from her - he is a bit scared of her anyway so anything that scares her must be terrifying (even if he doesn't understand why). I spend a lot of time in undergrowth letting other dog walkers pass
    I did spend a lot on behavioural training but there seems to be something about her that makes other dogs attack so now we just stick to remote areas or ones where others should always be on lead. Ours are always on lead so I put in the miles there.
    Last night's run club was a run along the riverside which is also the Parkrun course so it rekindled the interest. I certainly felt the fact that it was 4 weeks since I had last been able to run. I managed 3.7 miles before having to drop to scouts pace so the 10K on 6th May is still looking a bit iffy.
    • bugslett
    • By bugslett 18th Apr 19, 6:57 AM
    • 174 Posts
    • 641 Thanks
    bugslett
    #metoo
    I have never seen the point in risking damaging or wearing out the body prematurely with artificial exercise.. But at 70 I can go up a ladder with a chainsaw, split logs with an axe, and work lying down under the racecar for extended periods just as easily as I could 25 years ago. Every year is a bonus from here.....
    Originally posted by mgdavid
    I have read that interest in leisure exercise is partially genetic and I completely believe that

    I walk the dogs for 3-5 miles on work days, more on off days. I've remodelled my garden, still go dancing occasionally. A back injury and achilles problems cause problems if I'm doing activities for a long time, but I reckon I do enough exercise without the need for a gym ( which would bore me to death).
    Yes I'm bugslet, I lost my original log in details and old e-mail address.
    • Slinky
    • By Slinky 18th Apr 19, 9:20 AM
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    Slinky
    Those of you suffering from knee injuries or lack of desire to run, can I recommend Tai Chi. Gentle on the joints and nothing to build up a nasty sweat.
    • MallyGirl
    • By MallyGirl 18th Apr 19, 9:29 AM
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    MallyGirl
    I guess it is a balancing act. I want to be doing lots of outdoor things in retirement and I need to be fit enough to do that. No good going to the bottom of a mountain with an amazing summit view if you can't make it up there.
    At the moment, in full time work, I am time constrained so something like running - which I am a novice at - gives me a lot of bang for my buck. I could walk all day or run for 50 mins.
    I also struggle with my weight - I love food! I was biggest in my 30s, then lost 3.5 stone but through my 40s to now (52) I keep losing and gaining the same stone. I have it at the moment and would rather lose it again. I am not prepared to eat less, and what I eat is pretty healthy, so I have to move more.
    I have signed up for a term of adult swimming lessons after Easter - as much as anything to get access to a decent pool. I can swim breaststroke efficiently and slowly for ever but that won't get me fit so I need to crank it up or relearn crawl.
    • ex-pat scot
    • By ex-pat scot 18th Apr 19, 9:35 AM
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    ex-pat scot
    I guess it is a balancing act. I want to be doing lots of outdoor things in retirement and I need to be fit enough to do that. No good going to the bottom of a mountain with an amazing summit view if you can't make it up there.
    At the moment, in full time work, I am time constrained so something like running - which I am a novice at - gives me a lot of bang for my buck. I could walk all day or run for 50 mins.
    Originally posted by MallyGirl
    This is why.

    Life long health.

    In the end, it is a game we will always lose, but for me the goal is to ensure that I remain fit and healthy for as long as possible, to be able to do and enjoy everything I want to in later life.
    Training is great discipline, in the same way as financial saving. It's banking an element of future health, as long as it is continued. Racing is just an extra to keep the focus and provide a bit of gratification / feedback (we are all goal-oriented in some respect).

    I want to be able to trek, to run, to walk, to explore. Not to view from a car seat or veranda.
    • bluenose1
    • By bluenose1 18th Apr 19, 6:31 PM
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    bluenose1
    My friend and her partner are considering buying a house near Ruthin, Wales to move into when they retire.
    Just spent far too long looking at properties on Rightmove around there and pleasantly surprised by the prices.
    Not sure my oh would be willing to move, he is not the most adventurous. We actually live in the house that his parents originally owned and they moved into the bungalow her parents lived in before they died. We are like the Clampetts
    Do like the thought of moving semi rural, maybe consider renting for 6 months first to check we like area.
    Money SPENDING Expert

    • Vespaboy
    • By Vespaboy 18th Apr 19, 10:14 PM
    • 8 Posts
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    Vespaboy
    I second the Tai Chi - it is harder than it looks and very relaxing
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