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  • FIRST POST
    • bluenose1
    • By bluenose1 4th Apr 19, 8:57 PM
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    bluenose1
    (NON FINANCIAL) Retirement plans/ dreams/ discussion.
    • #1
    • 4th Apr 19, 8:57 PM
    (NON FINANCIAL) Retirement plans/ dreams/ discussion. 4th Apr 19 at 8:57 PM
    Hi,
    not sure if anyone wants to join in but on Bugslett suggestion thought we could have a thread to discuss lifestyles, hobbies, travel, interests etc etc that we pursue or intend to when we retire.

    I am 2 years and 2 months away from retiring at 55. I change my mind regularly, though at moment hoping to downsize and be on holiday for several months of the year. I wonder after a couple of years of retirement, when my youngest who is 16 is more independent we will choose to base ourselves abroad, Brexit allowing of course.
    I run (very slowly) or volunteer to marshall at a weekly local Parkrun and love the social side of the cake, coffee and chat afterwards. Have met some lovely people from all different walks of life and it always cheers me up.
    Really looking forward to retiring but fear the loss of income in case I need more money to help kids out with more than I thought for deposits on houses etc etc.
    Money SPENDING Expert

Page 4
    • gibbo9
    • By gibbo9 13th Apr 19, 7:53 AM
    • 38 Posts
    • 55 Thanks
    gibbo9
    We finished 2 years ago at 59 and 55 having had a melanoma scare a few years earlier. 2 months in and it returned. Just come out of hospital yesterday having had another reoccurrence and getting ready for 12 months immunotherapy to hopefully keep it at bay.
    None of this was planned for in retirement just lots of walking cycling and touring in our caravan.
    So glad we did go when we did and would encourage anyone to do the same if thinking about it
    You never know what's round the corner.
    • MallyGirl
    • By MallyGirl 13th Apr 19, 10:43 AM
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    MallyGirl
    This is the message I am trying to get across to DH. He has had far too many colleagues and ex colleagues die young, and my boss had a heart attack last year just after his 40th. I have spent the last year or so talking about retirement on a regular basis. The van was dropped in to be converted to a camper last week and we have another 18 months (minimum) till DD goes to uni. She is refusing to go away with us again, apart from one week in Snowdonia already booked in the summer, before her A levels so we expect to get some early use out of it. It will probably be good for her to experience being without us a bit before uni - although DH is still trying to get his head around this as a concept!
    • crv1963
    • By crv1963 13th Apr 19, 11:53 AM
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    crv1963
    This is the message I am trying to get across to DH. He has had far too many colleagues and ex colleagues die young, and my boss had a heart attack last year just after his 40th. I have spent the last year or so talking about retirement on a regular basis. The van was dropped in to be converted to a camper last week and we have another 18 months (minimum) till DD goes to uni. She is refusing to go away with us again, apart from one week in Snowdonia already booked in the summer, before her A levels so we expect to get some early use out of it. It will probably be good for her to experience being without us a bit before uni - although DH is still trying to get his head around this as a concept!
    Originally posted by MallyGirl
    I had my heart attack out of the blue at 53 years old two years ago- no warning, lifestyle I thought reasonably healthy- now changed, so yes we'll go as we can afford it, I think by the time I hit 58 or 59. Trouble is I really enjoy most aspects of my job!

    With regards children growing it does take some head space! My youngest is 22, I sometimes struggle with it, my wife tells me-"If he's hungry he's quite capable of getting a snack!"
    CRV1963- Light bulb moment Sept 15- Planning the great escape- aka retirement!
    • bluenose1
    • By bluenose1 13th Apr 19, 1:19 PM
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    bluenose1
    My husband has just come back from playing football and one of the guys couldn't play as had just been told his blood pressure through roof. Another reason I want to get away from work stress.

    Our youngest is 16 and at least can make himself an omelette, though we won't leave him overnight until he is 18. A lot more self sufficient than my two eldest ever where.
    Though that is as much my fault as there's as with working full time I tended to do all the cooking and their job was the dishes.

    Having our first night away tomorrow night alone as my 22 year old is "babysitting" Got a good Groupon offer for £89 for 2 for bed, breakfast and Dinner in a Grade 2 Hotel with excellent reviews on tripadvisor.
    A taste of what I hope retirement will be like.
    Money SPENDING Expert

    • MallyGirl
    • By MallyGirl 13th Apr 19, 1:39 PM
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    MallyGirl
    We were just away for a few days in the New Forest while DD was climbing Snowdon with DofE. Nice to do something just for us (and dogs). We haven't yet left DD (17) overnight but she is priming us to do so next Easter as she wants peace to revise. She is very sensible but DH will still worry - she did a trek in Nepal last year and we took the opportunity to go to see bears in Vancouver but DH had to sign on every day to the satellite tracker they took with them to make sure they were still moving!
    • bluenose1
    • By bluenose1 13th Apr 19, 2:46 PM
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    bluenose1
    Mallygirl - New Forest sounds lovely, Your DH sounds just like mine re worrying. There again I can understand his concern if she was in Nepal etc.
    Now that my eldest two have left home I worry about them less thankfully. Though have a feeling our 16 year old will live at home whilst at University. More sleepless nights coming up for me when he goes into town drinking with his friends!!!
    Money SPENDING Expert

    • waveydavey48
    • By waveydavey48 14th Apr 19, 1:06 PM
    • 25 Posts
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    waveydavey48
    It's sobering to consider how many of us have had apparently healthy colleagues who have died quite young. One chap I worked with did his 40 years with the company, was financially set and died on the first anniversary of the day he left at age 60.

    Once you're sorted financially, live a bit.
    • MallyGirl
    • By MallyGirl 14th Apr 19, 2:28 PM
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    MallyGirl
    DH worked for a small company for many years before being made redundant- he then joined another small one (only for it to be bought by a massive company). At the first one there were 2 sudden deaths amongst people he knew pretty well - one in his 30s and one in his 40s. There were also 2 suicides. It was a very high stress environment all round and we were both glad when he was out of there. Sadly the new company matches pretty closely - 2 sudden death under 40 & 1 suicide in less than 3 years.
    DH is overweight and I worry- at least he is happier in the new role but the stress is still there. He talks about losing weight and getting fitter but is out of the house for 12 hours and then comes home to share in the ferrying of DD. I am hopeful that DD passing her driving test will mean we can do some things for ourselves in the evening.
    • enthusiasticsaver
    • By enthusiasticsaver 14th Apr 19, 7:52 PM
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    enthusiasticsaver
    We are early retirees too. DH retired at the end of 2016 at aged 58 and I retired at the end of 2017 at 57. We don't get our state pensions until age 66 so that is 2024 and 2026 but are living off savings and DB pensions at the moment.


    DH has always had lots of hobbies so manages to fill his time with anything to do with trains it seems. He belongs to a model railway club and has done for several decades and they exhibit all over the country. He has recently started volunteering for a local primary school who has built a garden railway in the grounds so he maintains with a friend and goes in to instruct teachers on how it runs so they can build into curriculum. He is a retired engineer so builds model trains too. He has a small hobby room at home and a workshop in our large garage where he has any number of what seem like expensive tools like lathes, laser cutters, etc etc.


    My hobbies are more social and energetic. We both belong to a local leisure club so I use the pool, spa, classes and gym and DH goes to a class and we use the restaurant/caf! and soft play with our granddaughters who we look after one day a week. I am always meeting friends for coffees, lunches, theatre trips etc and just joined the U3A walking group and garden group to do local walks varying from 2 or 3 miles to 10 miles. They meet once a week and once a month the U3a garden club visit a local garden of which there are many in Cornwall. The rest of my time is taken up with gardening, reading, playing the piano etc.


    We travel more now we are retired. This year because of Brexit we shunned going abroad until we saw how it pans out but are planning a month long trip to Canada in 2020. We will also do a family centre parks trip to celebrate my 60th birthday. This year I have done Brittany with a friend in March and will be spending a week in the New Forest in June with the whole family and ten days in the lake district with DH in September. Several weekends away either in Bristol to see my eldest daughter or Surrey to visit my Mum. We take every opportunity to use our National Trust membership too when the weather permits.


    In between we are doing home improvement projects. Last year we put in a new kitchen and this year we will change the bathrooms. Next year it is the garden. Always with an eye on easy maintenance. We live in a modernish 4 bed house but even though it is just the two of us we seem to use every room either for hobbies, grandchildren or spare room for our eldest daughter who lives away from our town.

    We decided to go early while we were healthy and are trying to enjoy as active a retirement as possible. We never seem to get bored and enjoy the freedom of just doing what we want.
    Early retired in December 2017

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    • bugslett
    • By bugslett 15th Apr 19, 12:37 PM
    • 188 Posts
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    bugslett
    DH is overweight and I worry- at least he is happier in the new role but the stress is still there. He talks about losing weight and getting fitter but is out of the house for 12 hours and then comes home to share in the ferrying of DD. I am hopeful that DD passing her driving test will mean we can do some things for ourselves in the evening.
    Originally posted by MallyGirl
    Only in the last few months have I gone from leaving the house at 05.45 and getting back around 12 hours later, and those have been the shortest hours of my working life.

    Being a fat bird, I'm looking forward to having more time to look after myself and cut the stress down a lot. Being healthier is the nearest thing I have to a plan.

    9 more operational days left
    Yes I'm bugslet, I lost my original log in details and old e-mail address.
    • shinytop
    • By shinytop 15th Apr 19, 12:51 PM
    • 242 Posts
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    shinytop
    I'm looking forward to having more time to look after myself and cut the stress down a lot.
    That's exactly what I'm going to do. It's not just the stress of work, it's the stress of having to fit everything else into the small amount of time available between working/sleeping and having little or no time to just do nothing.
    • MallyGirl
    • By MallyGirl 15th Apr 19, 1:12 PM
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    MallyGirl
    I currently have a spreadsheet as a daily planner that I keep up to date and then reprint on a regular basis. It is colour coded for the 3 of us. It is the only way I can keep track of where we all need to be, with what gear and at what time. If it isn't added to the planner then it probably won't happen The print out is on a clipboard in the kitchen so everyone knows where to check first before committing to anything.
    A lot of it is DD (pink) but DH is quite often in either London, HQ or offsite planning meetings which affect when he leaves in the morning and when he might get home. I have to go to the office about once a month these days which is an overnight and fixed time trains. I really, really look forward to the point when this is no longer needed. I had a 3 visit SPA membership for xmas last year and struggled to fit them in during the year. This year I got 6 visits as it removed the peak time restrictions but I haven't managed 1 visit yet.
    When I am stressed, or tired, I eat which doesn't really help in the long run.
    I think I need to prioritise myself more but I am the glue that holds it all together - WFH means it is easier for me to sort the bills, shop, cook, etc. Retirement for me means become less sticky!!!
    • Tahlullah
    • By Tahlullah 15th Apr 19, 1:40 PM
    • 950 Posts
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    Tahlullah
    Hello. I have been reading and see so many similarities with my aspirations.

    I will shortly be 54 years old and have been thinking about retirement more frequently than I should. I enjoy my work but it is no longer the be all and end all it used to be. I am ready to go.

    Unfortunately, I have a really poor pension pot to rely on, as my field of work paid so poorly when I was younger. It hasn't really improved, it's just that I became more 'aware' as I got older and attempted to mitigate against retiring with nothing except the State Retirement Pension.

    I am in the process of trying to pay off my mortgage, which was anticipated to be in 5 years time-ish. However, I am conscious of my own mortality and so have decided I want to divert some of this money into buying a camper van. I just feel it seems sensible to buy it now whilst I am earning, rather than waiting until retirement, when I am 60 or 67, depending which one I get to first, and so reducing my money pot for living on an expensive buy. So, trying to get it now and enjoy it whilst I can.

    I don't have plans to buy another house as I already own one by the sea (one of the sensible things I did when I was younger and could afford it). So, in theory, I should be set to give up work, earn enough to survive in a pt job until my pension kicks in, have a camper van to take me on holiday around the country when I feel like it, while retired to the coast.

    After that, I don't really have any plans. Just to make hay whilst the sun shines. Until then, keep paying off the mortgage, which keeps increasing whenever I think of something else I want to do before I shuffle off this earth.
    Still striving to be mortgage free before I get to a point I can't enjoy it.

    15 February 2019 - Mortgage debt - £78,400
    23 April 2019 - Mortgage debt - £85,000
    • Parking Trouble
    • By Parking Trouble 15th Apr 19, 3:46 PM
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    • 182 Thanks
    Parking Trouble
    Resigned end of March. Retiring end of June. I'll be 61. Wife carrying on PT for up to 5 years longer.

    Initially just want to not be tied to a laptop waiting for an email to arrive or for next meeting to start.

    Live in London. So much to explore. Got a dog and have many, many miles of walking on our doorstep.

    Got plenty of little projects in mind. Friend wants his classic car recommissioned. Food hygiene certificate for some catering ideas.

    Somewhat constrained with lengthy holidays due to dog and wife working.
    Mr Straw described whiplash as "not so much an injury, more a profitable invention of the human imagination—undiagnosable except by third-rate doctors in the pay of the claims management companies or personal injury lawyers"

    • bugslett
    • By bugslett 15th Apr 19, 4:57 PM
    • 188 Posts
    • 682 Thanks
    bugslett
    Hello. I have been reading and see so many similarities with my aspirations.

    I will shortly be 54 years old and have been thinking about retirement more frequently than I should. I enjoy my work but it is no longer the be all and end all it used to be. I am ready to go.

    Unfortunately, I have a really poor pension pot to rely on, as my field of work paid so poorly when I was younger. It hasn't really improved, it's just that I became more 'aware' as I got older and attempted to mitigate against retiring with nothing except the State Retirement Pension.

    I am in the process of trying to pay off my mortgage, which was anticipated to be in 5 years time-ish. However, I am conscious of my own mortality and so have decided I want to divert some of this money into buying a camper van. I just feel it seems sensible to buy it now whilst I am earning, rather than waiting until retirement, when I am 60 or 67, depending which one I get to first, and so reducing my money pot for living on an expensive buy. So, trying to get it now and enjoy it whilst I can.

    I don't have plans to buy another house as I already own one by the sea (one of the sensible things I did when I was younger and could afford it). So, in theory, I should be set to give up work, earn enough to survive in a pt job until my pension kicks in, have a camper van to take me on holiday around the country when I feel like it, while retired to the coast.

    After that, I don't really have any plans. Just to make hay whilst the sun shines. Until then, keep paying off the mortgage, which keeps increasing whenever I think of something else I want to do before I shuffle off this earth.
    Originally posted by Tahlullah
    Have you thought of renting.g out your house as a holiday let?

    I stress that I am only pondering multiple options, one is to get a narrowboat and lliveaboard, sell my house and buy another in a holiday area that I can let out. That may not be suitable for you. My current house is too much my home to let out, not that it's in the right area!
    Yes I'm bugslet, I lost my original log in details and old e-mail address.
    • geoffers4
    • By geoffers4 15th Apr 19, 11:55 PM
    • 146 Posts
    • 979 Thanks
    geoffers4
    What a great thread.
    We are in a v.similar position to many on here - I'm 56, still working full-time but will definitely finish work at 60 or before. OH a few years younger but has been unable to work for 2-3 years because of a chronic illness. The illness is helped significantly by sunshine and warmth so we've been spending increasing amounts of time in the Canary Islands, especially in the winter months. So this is likely to become a central plank of our retirement plans. Some friends have recently bought a property out there and it's quite inspiring to see how they've turned this into an income stream as well as a holiday home.

    What other interests will we pursue? parkrun, learning Spanish, growing our own veg, walking in the Lake District... we're only really limited by our imaginations, aren't we?
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    • Tahlullah
    • By Tahlullah 16th Apr 19, 9:02 AM
    • 950 Posts
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    Tahlullah
    Hi Bugslett, like you I cannot rent out my home because that is what it is, my home. A shame really because as an income stream it would serve me well, but I like going home at the weekends and relaxing.

    I love swimming and paddle boarding, both of which I can do at home. I'm not a keen gardener and running is a bit too strenuous for me.

    I have yet to discover my passions in life which will determine what I do with my time when retired, outside snowboarding, swimming and paddle boarding. There are always thousands of older people skiing and enjoying the sport when I go on my winter holiday, so I intend to join them.

    This is where the camper van would come into play by allowing me to take advantage of the ski slopes in Scotland and perhaps Germany and France without the costs associated with flights, transport of equipment, hotels and then food and lift passes on top.

    Looking forward to it!

    As geoffers4 says, I am only limited by my own imagination.
    Still striving to be mortgage free before I get to a point I can't enjoy it.

    15 February 2019 - Mortgage debt - £78,400
    23 April 2019 - Mortgage debt - £85,000
    • mark5
    • By mark5 16th Apr 19, 6:29 PM
    • 1,224 Posts
    • 828 Thanks
    mark5
    i have five years. I'd like to say "more or less" but it's "more". Won't be "less", as I am very heavily reliant on SIPP access at 55.


    I have pipe dreams of lots of exercise - Parkruns, cycling, duathlons, mountain walking, skiing. Trying to get back to an 18 minute Parkrun. Exploring. Touring. Long distance path walking. Camino de Santiago.

    What I wont be worrying about is deposits for children's houses. I have 4 (children, not houses). There would never be enough, and I would have to work for a few years extra just to earn the money (I have a huge marginal tax rate, so 2/3 of what I would be paid would get taken off me in tax/ NI and 1/3 as funds for the children.)

    I want to enjoy the end of the weekend, without the dread of having to head down to London, and the guilt of not having done enough work over the weekend to keep afloat of my monster workload. I want to be able to make plans on a whim, not to be dictated by the schedules of my children.

    I want to wake up one day and think "what should I do today" and decide there and then to do it without any guilt of work avoided, commitments missed, or jobs building up in my absence.



    I want to be a lion-tamer.
    Originally posted by ex-pat scot
    18 mins at 50 is good going.
    • MallyGirl
    • By MallyGirl 16th Apr 19, 7:58 PM
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    MallyGirl
    Blooming amazing- as a novice runner my PB is just under 33 mins and that felt like I was dying!!!!
    • Marine_life
    • By Marine_life 16th Apr 19, 8:36 PM
    • 967 Posts
    • 1,876 Thanks
    Marine_life
    I was a big runner in my early 30's with a 10k best of 36:40 and a half marathon of 1:22. But running was a sport I loved to hate. I trained a lot, sometimes twice a day and raced almost every weekend. I was always sore or injured and when my times stopped improving I became disheartened and I eventually gave up running completely.

    I returned briefly in my 40's to tick the box on a marathon (completed in 3:40) and was so disappointed (with my time) that I ran another one three weeks later (in 3:46!), but then gave up again.

    Looking back I wish I have savoured those days. I wish someone had said to me "enjoy this, because its the best you'll ever be". Sometimes in life its almost like we need that outside in view to give us some perspective.

    I started running again last year (at age 53, now 54) and am determined to enjoy it for as long as possible. My knees give me the occasional problem which I can manage by keeping distance below 10k and not running more than two days in succession. Can now run a relatively relaxed 5k in 25 minutes. I may do a park run but at the moment I want to make sure I enjoy every run...who knows how many more there will be.
    Money won't buy you happiness....but I have rarely if ever been in a situation where more money made things worse!
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