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    • Rh5831
    • By Rh5831 13th Jan 19, 8:23 PM
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    Rh5831
    Family lodgers?
    • #1
    • 13th Jan 19, 8:23 PM
    Family lodgers? 13th Jan 19 at 8:23 PM
    Hi all,

    Iím a home owner under a residential mortgage. My home is in the north but I work in the southeast through the week and then travel back home most weekends. I have a 3 bed freehold house, With 2 rooms free. My grandma has recently become ill due to an aneurysm and is in need of care (which I cannot do whilst working away). My home is very close to her and because of this, my aunt was wondering if she could occupy the 2 other free rooms of my house with her husband and 2 kids In order to be close enough to look after her. Aslong as I live in the third room. is this allowed? Would I need to inform the mortgage lender and insurance provider?

    Any advice or help would be greatly appreciated!

    Thankyou!
Page 1
    • Bossypants
    • By Bossypants 13th Jan 19, 8:44 PM
    • 738 Posts
    • 1,436 Thanks
    Bossypants
    • #2
    • 13th Jan 19, 8:44 PM
    • #2
    • 13th Jan 19, 8:44 PM
    You might need to inform your insurance but generally not your mortgage.

    Having said that, I would think VERY carefully about letting an entire family move in with you, even if they are your close family. Two adults and two kids will quickly colonise the whole house, whether or not they intend to, and may leave you feeling like a guest in your own home. An old lady can be poorly for a very long time, even a decade or more. If you do go through with it, be VERY clear (in writing!) of the rules, especially what happens if you want to end the arrangement.
    Last edited by Bossypants; 13-01-2019 at 9:05 PM.
    • Rh5831
    • By Rh5831 13th Jan 19, 9:06 PM
    • 4 Posts
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    Rh5831
    • #3
    • 13th Jan 19, 9:06 PM
    • #3
    • 13th Jan 19, 9:06 PM
    Yes that was also a worry, however as said for the majority of the time I’m not there.. only for weekends unless I take leave. Just wanting to make sure I’m not committing some type of mortgage fraud or going against the T’s and C’s. I agree ill definitely be getting it in writing. Thankyou for your help!
    • Marvel1
    • By Marvel1 13th Jan 19, 9:20 PM
    • 3,778 Posts
    • 4,161 Thanks
    Marvel1
    • #4
    • 13th Jan 19, 9:20 PM
    • #4
    • 13th Jan 19, 9:20 PM
    When you take leave, do you want to live with a family of 4?
    • sevenhills
    • By sevenhills 13th Jan 19, 9:27 PM
    • 1,986 Posts
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    sevenhills
    • #5
    • 13th Jan 19, 9:27 PM
    • #5
    • 13th Jan 19, 9:27 PM
    Yes that was also a worry, however as said for the majority of the time Iím not there.. only for weekends unless I take leave. Just wanting to make sure Iím not committing some type of mortgage fraud or going against the Tís and Cís. I agree ill definitely be getting it in writing. Thankyou for your help!
    Originally posted by Rh5831

    I was under the impression that you needed to inform your mortgage provider if taking in lodgers, when I informed mine, they were not interested.
    Its a big commitment if this is going to be their main home, or is it just temporary.

    • Cakeguts
    • By Cakeguts 13th Jan 19, 9:33 PM
    • 5,444 Posts
    • 8,311 Thanks
    Cakeguts
    • #6
    • 13th Jan 19, 9:33 PM
    • #6
    • 13th Jan 19, 9:33 PM
    Where does your aunt live normally? It isn't ideal for your aunt to leave her home vacant for all the time she is looking after your grandmother as it could go on for months.



    Another thing to consider. I assume that at the moment you sleep in the biggest room? How many of the other bedrooms will be bit enough for a couple to occupy? I can see this happening. Your aunt and her husband have the master bedroom the children share the 2nd bedroom and you have the smallest. Do you really want to live in your house like this? Not only that but what is to stop them from putting a child in each of the bedrooms and moving one of them out when you arrive at the weekend? The chances are that you are going to find yourself sleeping in a bedroom full of child's toys when you are home at the weekend. Are you prepared to fall out with these people to take back control of what is your home?
    • gettingtheresometime
    • By gettingtheresometime 13th Jan 19, 9:33 PM
    • 4,337 Posts
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    gettingtheresometime
    • #7
    • 13th Jan 19, 9:33 PM
    • #7
    • 13th Jan 19, 9:33 PM
    Where do they live now?

    I'm only asking because if they rent then should your Nan require more care than your Aunt can give or worse, what happens then?
    Lloyds OD / Natwest OD / PO CC / Wescott / Argos Card cleared thanks to the 1 debt v 100 day challenge


    Next on the list - JD Williams
    • Rh5831
    • By Rh5831 13th Jan 19, 9:36 PM
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    Rh5831
    • #8
    • 13th Jan 19, 9:36 PM
    • #8
    • 13th Jan 19, 9:36 PM
    Seven hills. That was my original thought, that they would would need to be informed. So do you think that they wouldn’t mind? And this would literally just be whilst my grandma is in need of help.

    Marvel1 - in all honesty, no. However, when it comes to wether or not my grandma gets the care and has someone there whilst I’m away I know what I’d choose.
    • Rh5831
    • By Rh5831 13th Jan 19, 9:51 PM
    • 4 Posts
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    Rh5831
    • #9
    • 13th Jan 19, 9:51 PM
    • #9
    • 13th Jan 19, 9:51 PM
    I apppreciate all these answers!

    Cakeguts- right now we are just looking at all of the options, this is one of them. Iím just looking for advice to see if itís even possible/allowed. Iíll then weigh up the pros and cons to all of the issues you have just highlighted and more.
    • dawyldthing
    • By dawyldthing 13th Jan 19, 9:59 PM
    • 3,264 Posts
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    dawyldthing
    I moved my Nan in when she was struggling. I’m sure when I took out the mortgage it says family can live there as they aren’t classed as lodgers. I just declared it to the insurance company each year.

    But, as someone has said, it can take over you life (I know your not home a lot now but it’s something to consider). We went through a stage where Nan wouldn’t sleep through the night and would shout to the dog ‘I don’t think anyone is getting up yet’, and this was at 3 in the morning.

    You’ve also got to consider what they will do if Nan needs to go into nursing care - will they live there forever?
    roll on 27th April 2019 or there abouts *25 done* = *15 to go*
    • xylophone
    • By xylophone 13th Jan 19, 10:02 PM
    • 27,994 Posts
    • 16,882 Thanks
    xylophone
    Presumably the children are not of school/nursery age?
    • Red-Squirrel
    • By Red-Squirrel 13th Jan 19, 10:31 PM
    • 4,001 Posts
    • 10,771 Thanks
    Red-Squirrel
    What kind of care does your nan need and how long is she likely to need it for?

    If its a week or two, this is not a terrible idea.

    If its long term/permanent, this isn't the answer at all.
    • sevenhills
    • By sevenhills 13th Jan 19, 11:00 PM
    • 1,986 Posts
    • 750 Thanks
    sevenhills
    Seven hills. That was my original thought, that they would would need to be informed. So do you think that they wouldnít mind? And this would literally just be whilst my grandma is in need of help.
    Originally posted by Rh5831

    It wont matter to your mortgage provider at all. You dont need to say you are working away, that will just confuse the issue.

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