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    • Sheep
    • By Sheep 13th Jan 19, 10:04 AM
    • 212Posts
    • 40Thanks
    Sheep
    Best trees for privacy.
    • #1
    • 13th Jan 19, 10:04 AM
    Best trees for privacy. 13th Jan 19 at 10:04 AM
    Hi all,

    We have recently bought a new build and love it however they have now moved on to the final stage and have now built the house behind mine and it feels like we are just looking out over each other.

    I am thinking of buying some tall trees to put up just in the corner where we overlook each other. They will have to be fairly thin as the garden isnt huge.

    Can anyone recommend what trees to use and where to start?

    Kind regards

    Sheep
Page 1
    • Bossypants
    • By Bossypants 13th Jan 19, 10:17 AM
    • 739 Posts
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    Bossypants
    • #2
    • 13th Jan 19, 10:17 AM
    • #2
    • 13th Jan 19, 10:17 AM
    Leylandii are the classic for this, being evergreen and fast growing, but they can get very tall if not kept in check, and may make you unpopular with neighbours if the trees take out their light.
    • Browntoa
    • By Browntoa 13th Jan 19, 10:19 AM
    • 34,339 Posts
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    Browntoa
    • #3
    • 13th Jan 19, 10:19 AM
    • #3
    • 13th Jan 19, 10:19 AM
    And in many areas limits to the height of Leylandi
    I'm the Board Guide of the Referrers ,Telephones, Pensions , Shop Don't drop ,over 50's , Boost your income and Discount Code boards which means I volunteer to help get your forum questions answered and keep the forum runnning smoothly .However, please remember, board guides don't read every post. If you spot an inappropriate or illegal post please report it to forumteam@moneysavingexpert.com Any views are mine and not the official line of MoneySavingExpert.
    • Bossypants
    • By Bossypants 13th Jan 19, 10:23 AM
    • 739 Posts
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    Bossypants
    • #4
    • 13th Jan 19, 10:23 AM
    • #4
    • 13th Jan 19, 10:23 AM
    I think that's only when in hedge form, not individual trees?

    Edit: Apparently the limit is 2, according to this: https://www.leylandii.com/leylandii-law/
    • tori.k
    • By tori.k 13th Jan 19, 10:27 AM
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    tori.k
    • #5
    • 13th Jan 19, 10:27 AM
    • #5
    • 13th Jan 19, 10:27 AM
    In a small space avoid Leylandii better opting for Ligustrum (privet) or for better interest Osmanthus that will give you fragrant white flowers, another option to keep space is erecting some trellis and growing a mix of climbers against it.
    • martindow
    • By martindow 13th Jan 19, 10:47 AM
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    martindow
    • #6
    • 13th Jan 19, 10:47 AM
    • #6
    • 13th Jan 19, 10:47 AM
    How tall is tall? Could you get away with plants trained up trellis? If it needs to be really tall maybe some poplars or eucalyptus would work. These are deciduous but maybe that wouldn't be problem if your issue is the garden being overlooked. You also should consider the orientation and whether these trees could seriously shade your house and garden.
    • Mojisola
    • By Mojisola 13th Jan 19, 10:58 AM
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    Mojisola
    • #7
    • 13th Jan 19, 10:58 AM
    • #7
    • 13th Jan 19, 10:58 AM
    Bamboo in big pots will give an instant effect.
    • Davesnave
    • By Davesnave 13th Jan 19, 11:57 AM
    • 27,099 Posts
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    Davesnave
    • #8
    • 13th Jan 19, 11:57 AM
    • #8
    • 13th Jan 19, 11:57 AM
    How tall is tall? Could you get away with plants trained up trellis? If it needs to be really tall maybe some poplars or eucalyptus would work. These are deciduous but maybe that wouldn't be problem if your issue is the garden being overlooked. You also should consider the orientation and whether these trees could seriously shade your house and garden.
    Originally posted by martindow
    Poplar shouldn't be planted anywhere near drains and eucalyptus will go faster than leylandii if you let them! I second carefully chosen bamboo from somewhere like the BIg Plant Company.

    Why not tell us how high you think the trees would need to be? Bear in mind that you knowingly bought a house with a small garden and on an estate that was likely to expand, so whatever you do will probably impact on someone else.'Tall' means nothing in the context of native British trees which can reach 20-30metres, no problem. One of those in the average garden = a big problem!
    Gardening is cheaper than psychotherapy.....and you get tomatoes.
    • shinytop
    • By shinytop 13th Jan 19, 12:02 PM
    • 119 Posts
    • 70 Thanks
    shinytop
    • #9
    • 13th Jan 19, 12:02 PM
    • #9
    • 13th Jan 19, 12:02 PM
    The trouble with leylandii is that they make quite a large area round them unable so support anything else, e.g. grass. And after 10-15 years they don't look great in a 6-8 ft hedge. If you can get away with 1 or 2 leylandii it might work as they look OK it given space to spread. I inherited a garden full of leylandii.



    Another (and IMO better looking) hedge that grows fast is laurel. The problem with nice hedges like privet is that they take many years to grow.
    • comeandgo
    • By comeandgo 13th Jan 19, 12:06 PM
    • 2,373 Posts
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    comeandgo
    If you have tall trees will it restrict the sun into your garden? It's possible the neighbours will not be that interest in viewing you anyway or put up something themselves?
    • dunstonh
    • By dunstonh 13th Jan 19, 12:15 PM
    • 96,442 Posts
    • 64,333 Thanks
    dunstonh
    We have about 40 Leylandii across part of our land. Some bright spark thought it was a good idea to create privacy around 30-40 years ago. They are now much taller than the house and has created an area that is permanently in the shade and that has encouraged moss to grow. It also has sucked significant amounts of water out of the ground which has had knock-on effects elsewhere. However, they did achieve the objective of privacy as many people don't even know the house is there.

    We are now having to spend many thousands of pounds taking around 30ft off their height.

    Leylandii can cause problems years down the road.
    I am an Independent Financial Adviser (IFA). Comments are for discussion purposes only. They are not financial advice. If you feel an area discussed may be relevant to you, then please seek advice from an Independent Financial Adviser local to you.
    • PattyO88
    • By PattyO88 13th Jan 19, 12:43 PM
    • 9 Posts
    • 5 Thanks
    PattyO88
    Hi, Looking for trees that provide privacy from the wrong kind of neighborhood watch?

    Green Giant Thuja (Arborvitae) would be a great one for you.
    The Green Giant Thuja is widely considered one of the best trees for privacy, and certainly a fan favorite in many backyards. “Thujas are one of our most popular trees,” says Kantor. “They are extremely fast-growing, provide privacy quickly and are also cold hardy. They can survive in a multitude of climates and are not affected by many pests or diseases.”

    Their uniform, cone-like shape and consistent annual growth rate of 3 to 5 feet make for a polished tree privacy fence that requires very little pruning to maintain. You can trim the tops regularly for a classic, French Renaissance feel or leave them be for a more natural look.

    What You Need to Know
    Height Range: 30-40 feet
    Width Range: 5-8 feet in rows
    Sunlight: Full to partial (3 to 6+ hours of direct sun per day)
    Planting Guidelines: If you like the height and density of the Leyland Cypress but don’t have the conditions to maintain it, the Green Giant is a great alternative. Just be sure to have a defense against deer on hand, as their soft leaves and branches are irresistible to these native grazers.
    • Bossypants
    • By Bossypants 13th Jan 19, 12:52 PM
    • 739 Posts
    • 1,437 Thanks
    Bossypants
    Hi, Looking for trees that provide privacy from the wrong kind of neighborhood watch?

    Green Giant Thuja (Arborvitae) would be a great one for you.
    The Green Giant Thuja is widely considered one of the best trees for privacy, and certainly a fan favorite in many backyards. “Thujas are one of our most popular trees,” says Kantor. “They are extremely fast-growing, provide privacy quickly and are also cold hardy. They can survive in a multitude of climates and are not affected by many pests or diseases.”

    Their uniform, cone-like shape and consistent annual growth rate of 3 to 5 feet make for a polished tree privacy fence that requires very little pruning to maintain. You can trim the tops regularly for a classic, French Renaissance feel or leave them be for a more natural look.

    What You Need to Know
    Height Range: 30-40 feet
    Width Range: 5-8 feet in rows
    Sunlight: Full to partial (3 to 6+ hours of direct sun per day)
    Planting Guidelines: If you like the height and density of the Leyland Cypress but don’t have the conditions to maintain it, the Green Giant is a great alternative. Just be sure to have a defense against deer on hand, as their soft leaves and branches are irresistible to these native grazers.
    Originally posted by PattyO88
    When you directly copy and paste other people's work, it's polite to give credit: https://www.budgetdumpster.com/blog/best-trees-for-privacy/
    • Sapphire
    • By Sapphire 13th Jan 19, 1:08 PM
    • 2,436 Posts
    • 4,760 Thanks
    Sapphire
    Olive trees are very good and attractive plants. They are extremely dense and evergreen. They can grow very large, though I keep mine pruned and shaped to around 12 ft tall. If you leave them unpruned, they also produce fruits (olives). They grow best in a sunny spot.

    Bamboo is good, but don't buy a running bamboo, which would rapidly swamp the place unless the roots were contained.
    • Grumpelstiltskin
    • By Grumpelstiltskin 13th Jan 19, 1:16 PM
    • 2,355 Posts
    • 2,555 Thanks
    Grumpelstiltskin
    OP How much do you now about gardening in general and trees in particular?

    My guess is not a lot.

    You do realise you can't just stick trees in just inches from your boundary?

    As well as growing tall their roots spread.

    Don't do anything permanent until the other house is occupied and you can see how much it actually impacts on you.
    • alumende27
    • By alumende27 13th Jan 19, 1:55 PM
    • 357 Posts
    • 339 Thanks
    alumende27
    One of our neighbours put up Leylandii trees some years ago for "privacy", (despite the wall they were against being over two metres in height), which ended up growing up to over 8 metres and encroaching considerably on our property. It was an annoyance for both the previous owners of our house and ourselves. We ended up threatening action via the council to reduce the height, and they eventually cut them down completely.

    Generally neighbours have better things to do than stare into other peoples houses. You could consider net curtains if you're that concerned.
    • Tarambor
    • By Tarambor 13th Jan 19, 2:05 PM
    • 4,262 Posts
    • 3,269 Thanks
    Tarambor
    Remember as well that if the trees prevent sunlight getting onto their property they may have a claim against you. The Rights of Light Act 1959 states that if a Property has received daylight for the last 20 years they may be entitled to continue to receive that light. This means that if your neighbour builds a large fence or there are large trees which restrict the daylight your Property receives (for example by blocking daylight reaching a window), you may be able to apply to the courts for your daylight to be restored. Quite how that works with new builds I'm not sure but the argument could be made that the land had received daylight as there were no trees there prior to it being built.
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