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  • FIRST POST
    • kalamity52
    • By kalamity52 11th Jan 19, 8:00 PM
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    kalamity52
    Should I pay for a boiler service for my buyer?
    • #1
    • 11th Jan 19, 8:00 PM
    Should I pay for a boiler service for my buyer? 11th Jan 19 at 8:00 PM
    Hello

    I am new to this site and wonder if I can have some opinions please.

    I am in the process of selling my Victorian house with an almost Victorian boiler. I bought the house in 2000 and do not know how old the boiler was then and have not had it changed. I have never had a problem with the boiler but the pump stopped working in Year 1 after the heating was left off for about 3 months during Spring/Summer. When the same thing happened in Year 2 I just made sure I put the heating on in the summer months for a few minutes a day and it never happened again. On both these occasions my local plumber came in and sorted it out.

    I received an offer on my house in November and today I received a letter from my solicitor advising me that my buyer would like me to get the boiler serviced by a qualified engineer and to provide a certificate. I have done a bit of research and can appoint a firm that will do this for 60.

    The question is: should I?

    The house does need work doing to it which is reflected in the selling price so I am inclined to go back to my solicitor and so no!
Page 2
    • G_M
    • By G_M 12th Jan 19, 1:29 PM
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    G_M
    I imagine that's one of the main reasons that the buyer has asked for the boiler to be serviced.

    Why else would they ask?

    It's a quick and cheap way of finding out if the boiler works and/or is safe.
    Originally posted by eddddy
    errrrr...or he could just do a 2nd (3rd?) viewing and put his hand on the radiators. Hot? The boiler is working! Hot at the top and at the bottom? The radiators don't need bleeding or flushing.


    Turn on a hot tap. What comes out? Hot or cold water......?


    As for safe, well, check if the seller has a CO alarm (flashing). Even take one round and leave it near the boiler for 10 minutes whilst looking round the house.........
    • lookstraightahead
    • By lookstraightahead 12th Jan 19, 2:43 PM
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    lookstraightahead
    Let's put it this way. A buyer can ask what they want. The seller can refuse. The buyer can then walk away if they want. To be honest sellers have had buyers by the proverbials for a while it's about time it was the other way around.

    I would definitely check the status of the boiler - we bought a house and the first time the boiler broke down it was condemned (back in the day). As mickygg kindly pointed out, sellers aren't going to give you any negative points, a buyer needs to work them out for themselves.
    • lincroft1710
    • By lincroft1710 12th Jan 19, 3:08 PM
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    lincroft1710
    As this boiler appears to be 20+ years old, surely the prudent buyer would factor its replacement cost into their offer.
    • lookstraightahead
    • By lookstraightahead 12th Jan 19, 3:22 PM
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    lookstraightahead
    As this boiler appears to be 20+ years old, surely the prudent buyer would factor its replacement cost into their offer.
    Originally posted by lincroft1710
    Apparently it's been factored into the asking price although not mentioned lol
    • EachPenny
    • By EachPenny 12th Jan 19, 4:06 PM
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    EachPenny
    Yes. Don't be such a cheapskate. It's entirely reasonable to expect to see some evidence that a boiler has been regularly serviced. You could say no, but for the sake of 60 is it worth it?
    Originally posted by alumende27
    You are missing the point. It isn't being 'cheapskate' to question whether as a seller you need to go to the trouble of getting your boiler serviced to meet the demands of the buyer.

    You are right about the bit in bold, but that isn't what the buyer is asking for. If all they wanted was the evidence then the OP could supply copies of receipts/certificates, or respond to the buyer saying that evidence was not available (but confirming (if appropriate) the servicing has been done)

    The risk for the OP as seller is the service turns into major work, or for the boiler to be condemned.

    The buyer is asking the OP to spend 60 to reduce the risk (to the buyer) of major costs and/or the boiler being condemned soon after the sale has taken place.

    The buyer should be factoring that risk into their offer, or else having their own inspections/servicing carried out at their own cost.

    If it were me my response to the buyer would be 'brief' and to the point.
    • EachPenny
    • By EachPenny 12th Jan 19, 4:13 PM
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    EachPenny
    I am in the process of selling my Victorian house with an almost Victorian boiler. I bought the house in 2000 and do not know how old the boiler was then and have not had it changed. I have never had a problem with the boiler but the pump stopped working in Year 1 after the heating was left off for about 3 months during Spring/Summer. When the same thing happened in Year 2 I just made sure I put the heating on in the summer months for a few minutes a day and it never happened again. On both these occasions my local plumber came in and sorted it out.
    Originally posted by kalamity52
    This shouldn't be seen as any indication of the reliability or remaining life of the boiler.

    If you shut the heating down over the summer and the pump sits idle they are quite vulnerable to 'sticking'. (similar to seizing, but not as bad). This usually isn't something which even needs the pump replacing. It is a simple job for a householder with a screwdriver. But as you've discovered, it can simply be avoided by running the pump briefly on a regular basis.
    • parkrunner
    • By parkrunner 12th Jan 19, 5:34 PM
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    parkrunner
    If it's the only thing stopping the sale then spend the 60. If the sale then falls through you've got it ready for the next buyer.
    • Marvel1
    • By Marvel1 12th Jan 19, 6:07 PM
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    Marvel1
    I would do it but find the cheapest person to service it - who is gas registered of course and try and make it clear it's just a service as house is being sold and not willing to buy any parts that may go soon.
    • lookstraightahead
    • By lookstraightahead 12th Jan 19, 6:31 PM
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    lookstraightahead
    I think it will be serviced then re-negotiated. If you don't get it serviced I think the buyer will walk.
    • HHarry
    • By HHarry 12th Jan 19, 7:03 PM
    • 482 Posts
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    HHarry
    I've just had a similar request from my Buyers, and git a gas safety check / service done. It was a small cost in the scheme of things, and made me look helpful.

    You could get the service done - if the results are Ok pass the report on, if not just say you're not prepared to organise it.
    • Tom99
    • By Tom99 13th Jan 19, 8:22 AM
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    Tom99
    30 posts so far on whether to spend 60!
    • EachPenny
    • By EachPenny 13th Jan 19, 4:25 PM
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    EachPenny
    30 posts so far on whether to spend 60!
    Originally posted by Tom99
    31 posts so far on whether to..... risk having your ancient boiler condemned just before selling your house...

    ....and doing so in the middle of winter when you can't manage without one, and when heating engineers charge premium prices.

    It isn't as straightforward a decision as some people think.
    • Tom99
    • By Tom99 13th Jan 19, 4:42 PM
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    Tom99
    31 posts so far on whether to..... risk having your ancient boiler condemned just before selling your house...
    ....and doing so in the middle of winter when you can't manage without one, and when heating engineers charge premium prices.
    It isn't as straightforward a decision as some people think.
    Originally posted by EachPenny
    If the boiler might be unsafe can you risk not spending 60?
    • lookstraightahead
    • By lookstraightahead 13th Jan 19, 4:45 PM
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    lookstraightahead
    31 posts so far on whether to..... risk having your ancient boiler condemned just before selling your house...

    ....and doing so in the middle of winter when you can't manage without one, and when heating engineers charge premium prices.

    It isn't as straightforward a decision as some people think.
    Originally posted by EachPenny
    Which is why any buyer shouldn't take the risk.
    • ess0two
    • By ess0two 13th Jan 19, 4:50 PM
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    ess0two
    30 posts so far on whether to spend 60!
    Originally posted by Tom99
    Something the buyer should be paying for.
    Official MR B fan club,dont go............................
    • Sibz
    • By Sibz 13th Jan 19, 5:12 PM
    • 304 Posts
    • 214 Thanks
    Sibz
    There are a few posts on here best ignored.

    Boilers are things that are often checked by buyers, you say yours is 'Victorian' so whether it's working or not it's likely nearing the end of its life... Boilers should be getting service regularly anyway, if that's been neglected its only right that you pay for that. A service is getting off lightly.

    Maybe the potential buyers are ok with it being old but just want assurances that it is safe currently. That's absolutely reasonable. If you can't afford 60 can you afford to risk the sale falling through?
    • lookstraightahead
    • By lookstraightahead 13th Jan 19, 6:14 PM
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    lookstraightahead
    Something the buyer should be paying for.
    Originally posted by ess0two
    Depends whether the buyer wants to. There's no should about it. It's part of a sale negotiation which either side has the right to pull out of whenever they like. Just depends who wants the result most - the buyer or the seller. I wouldn't buy based on not knowing whether the boiler works and given that it's not been serviced for ages I probably wouldn't pay for it either.
    • PhilE
    • By PhilE 13th Jan 19, 8:21 PM
    • 561 Posts
    • 357 Thanks
    PhilE
    It can't be you, you provided the piece of paper as requested. (if I was asked my mate would do a 'service' and provide a piece or paper for a couple of beers).
    [/QUOTE]

    Only a gas safety engineer can give out such a certificate. And if your mate is a gas safety engineer and would do this, he'll get in a lot of trouble.
    • EachPenny
    • By EachPenny 13th Jan 19, 8:47 PM
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    EachPenny
    If the boiler might be unsafe can you risk not spending 60?
    Originally posted by Tom99
    There are potential faults which could result in the boiler being condemned that don't make it inherently unsafe to use (for a short period of time).

    There are also faults that could be caused through the service itself - if an obsolete part is damaged during the servicing then the boiler is dead.
    Which is why any buyer shouldn't take the risk.
    Originally posted by lookstraightahead
    Which is why the buyer should pay for a proper inspection, rather than trying to get the seller to pay for an unnecessary service.
    • lookstraightahead
    • By lookstraightahead 13th Jan 19, 9:17 PM
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    lookstraightahead
    Or the buyer should just walk away
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