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  • FIRST POST
    • PipneyJane
    • By PipneyJane 31st Dec 18, 3:30 PM
    • 1,055Posts
    • 8,092Thanks
    PipneyJane
    2019 Fashion on the Ration Challenge
    • #1
    • 31st Dec 18, 3:30 PM
    2019 Fashion on the Ration Challenge 31st Dec 18 at 3:30 PM
    Welcome to the 2019 Fashion On The Ration Challenge. The 2018 thread was very successful and can be found here. Based on the original 1941 Clothing Rations, several of us are continuing our "Fashion on the Ration" challenge into 2019.

    Even after last year’s challenge, I still have an overflowing wardrobe. Half of my coupons went on yarn, so rather than decreasing my yarn stash it grew considerably. My aim is to shop more thoughtfully. Any money saved will be a bonus. Would you like to join me?

    The original ration was 66 coupons. Items of clothing had the following coupon cost:



    To break it down into Women's clothing only:-


    Lined mackintosh or coat over 28" - 14 coupons
    Under 28" short coat or jacket - 11 coupons
    Frock, gown or dress of wool - 11 coupons
    Frock, gown or dress of other fabric - 7 coupons
    Bodice with girls skirt or gym tunic - 8 coupons
    Pyjamas - 8 coupons
    Divided skirt or skirt – 7 coupons
    Nightdress - 6 coupons
    Dungarees or overalls - 6 coupons
    Blouse, shirt, sports top, cardigan or jumper -5 coupons
    Pair of slippers, boots or shoes – 5 coupons
    Other garments including corsets - 3 coupons
    Petticoat or slip, cami-knickers or combinations - 4 coupons
    Apron or pinafore - 3 coupons
    Scarf, gloves, mittens or muff - 2 coupons
    Stockings per pair - 2 coupons
    Ankle socks per pair – 1 coupon
    1 yard wool cloth 36"wide – 3 coupons
    2 ounces of wool knitting yarn – 1 coupon

    Assumptions for the challenge:-
    • 1 metre of fabric equals 1 yard. No penalty for width.
    • 2 ounces of wool knitting yarn equals 50g of any knitting yarn containing natural fibres. Note: according to a display I once saw atthe Imperial War Museum, there was a different coupon cost for man-made fibre, but I've never found out what so let's assume acrylic is half the coupon cost of wool.
    • Based on the quantity of fabric and work involved, a "corset" is the equivalent of two bras.
    • Ditto one pair of Cami-knickers would equal two pairs of modern bikini-style knickers or thongs.
    • Bodice with skirt = shirt/blouse/t-shirt purchased at the same time as a matching or co-ordinating skirt or trousers = 8 coupons in total.
    • Dungarees = jeans = 6 coupons.
    • Ditto trousers
    • Leggings count as 2 coupons, the same as thermal tights.
    • Second-hand clothing is exempt.
    • Leather handbags aren't mentioned anywhere in the clothing coupon data. The assumption is that they weren't made once the war was in full swing. Ditto leather wallets and purses. I assume a leather handbag involves the same effort and leather as a pair of shoes at 5 coupons. A new wallet/purse can be 2 coupons.
    • Hats aren’t mentioned either, so if you purchase one, let’s assume it is for 2 coupons.

    I’ve already purchased a new suit for 2019, so will start the year deducting that from my total coupons: a double breasted jacket (11 coupons), skirt (7 coupons) and trousers (6 coupons). That’s 24 coupons already spent, leaving me with 42 for the rest of the year.

    - Pip

    This Forum tip was included in MoneySavingExpert.com's weekly email!
    Last edited by Former MSE Andrea; 14-02-2019 at 11:15 AM.
    "Be the type of woman that when you get out of bed in the morning, the devil says 'Oh crap. She's up.' "

    C.R.A.P R.O.L.L.Z. #47 Official Brain Harvesting Body Counter
Page 21
    • PollyWollyDoodle
    • By PollyWollyDoodle 10th Apr 19, 4:03 PM
    • 1,249 Posts
    • 25,613 Thanks
    PollyWollyDoodle
    Laura that skirt is FAB.U.LOUS (said in my best Craig Revell-Horwood voice), I love the colours. Glad to hear your partner's son is coming home.

    I like the idea of 'Awards' - something to aim for. I've just spent a further 16 coupons - a pair of black trousers, essential for work and I couldn't find anything suitable second hand, and a multipack of M&S undies. I have been talking about making my own knickers for at least a year, and still not got round to it. Maybe I'll sacrifice one of the old pairs (my fingers went through the side seam - they are very old!) as a pattern. It doesn't take long to get through those coupons, does it.
    "Inconceivable". "You keep using that word. I do not think it means what you think it means."
    • Laura_Elsewhere
    • By Laura_Elsewhere 11th Apr 19, 6:04 PM
    • 328 Posts
    • 2,198 Thanks
    Laura_Elsewhere
    Finished my latest pair of ankle-socks with yarn bought with the recent coupon-spend... and guess who's back to the dentist for another series of appts, argh, no, the knitting shop, and I thought I was safe til November!

    I've been short-sighted since I was 8 or 9, but I had two different pathologies diagnosed last year, out of the blue, newly-arrived, in both eyes - cataracts and astigmatism, neither of which run in the family, neither of which I was expecting at 49...

    The chances are reasonably good that eventually I'll have surgery which could result in better eyesight than since I was a child - but there are also reasonable chances of complications and other developments. We have to wait and watch (oh ho ho) - and of course I don't know how bad my eyesight will get before I'm approved for surgery - at present it apparently barely affects my vision, only my confidence...

    Anyway, I'm trying to get a basic me-sock pattern sorted, using the same needle-size and yarn-weight and stitch-count, etc., each time, so that even if my eyes deteriorate considerably I can still knit socks. These are a good start on the Standard Sock pattern!



    2019 Fashion on the Ration Challenge: 33.5 coupons left out of 66
    • CAFCGirl
    • By CAFCGirl 12th Apr 19, 7:51 AM
    • 8,661 Posts
    • 19,124 Thanks
    CAFCGirl
    I'm very excited!
    I have been gifted a pdf pattern for a Forager vest.
    I shall print that later and start sitting through my fabric to see if I can make it from my stash.

    I'm having a crafting day with my mum on monday. Sewing and pattern making g from her to me, and loom knitting tutorial from me to her . Lots of cups of tea and snacks too LOL
    Last edited by CAFCGirl; 12-04-2019 at 4:50 PM.

    10 years and still don't have a clue what I'm doing

    Trying to get by on a single Emergency Services income
    Fashion On The Ration Coupons 14\66
    March Grocery Challenge £250\£46.77
    • PipneyJane
    • By PipneyJane 12th Apr 19, 1:27 PM
    • 1,055 Posts
    • 8,092 Thanks
    PipneyJane
    https://pin.it/snbsibflfysbn4

    I usually upload to Pinterest but I will try Ravelry.
    This is a bad photo of it, and I'm wearing my cleaning clothes with it.
    Originally posted by CAFCGirl
    CAFCGirl, regardless of what you're wearing, the shrug looks lovely. Wear it with pride.

    I'm very excited!
    I have been gifted a pdf pattern for a Forever vest.
    I shall print that later and start sitting through my fabric to see if I can make it from my stash.

    I'm having a crafting day with my mum on monday. Sewing and pattern making g from her to me, and loom knitting tutorial from me to her . Lots of cups of tea and snacks too LOL
    Originally posted by CAFCGirl
    Have a lovely day on Monday. What is a "Forever Vest"? When I Googled the term, it came up with a hunting gilet.

    - Pip
    "Be the type of woman that when you get out of bed in the morning, the devil says 'Oh crap. She's up.' "

    C.R.A.P R.O.L.L.Z. #47 Official Brain Harvesting Body Counter
    • PipneyJane
    • By PipneyJane 12th Apr 19, 3:38 PM
    • 1,055 Posts
    • 8,092 Thanks
    PipneyJane
    Finished my latest pair of ankle-socks with yarn bought with the recent coupon-spend... and guess who's back to the dentist for another series of appts, argh, no, the knitting shop, and I thought I was safe til November!
    Originally posted by Laura_Elsewhere
    Pity about the dentist. Do we need to arrange to have you barred from the yarn shop?

    Actually, if the shop is any good and you're like me, you'll want to keep them in business by buying the decent stuff from them. Do you have a shopping list on your phone of yarn that you actually need? If not yarn, then needles? (Until recently, mine included "Sock yarn in shades that I can actually wear to work under my suit", but it's currently empty.)

    I've been short-sighted since I was 8 or 9, but I had two different pathologies diagnosed last year, out of the blue, newly-arrived, in both eyes - cataracts and astigmatism, neither of which run in the family, neither of which I was expecting at 49...

    The chances are reasonably good that eventually I'll have surgery which could result in better eyesight than since I was a child - but there are also reasonable chances of complications and other developments. We have to wait and watch (oh ho ho) - and of course I don't know how bad my eyesight will get before I'm approved for surgery - at present it apparently barely affects my vision, only my confidence...
    First - a big hug to you.

    Second, please excuse me while I dust off the nurse's hat that's been breeding dust bunnies in a corner for the last 25 years... (Yes, I was a nurse when I left Oz.) You can slap me, if I'm providing too much detail.

    You're dealing with two, totally separate problems. Astigmatism is where the cornea - the front of the eye - isn't completely spherical. For some reason, there's a flattening in one part. The variation is usually minuscule, but the effect means that your distance vision will be a bit fuzzy around the edges. You may have lived with an astigmatism for years and just assumed it was your short sight worsening.

    Astigmata change over time and may even improve. (Apparently my left eye's improved between my last pair of glasses and these latest ones.) Surgeons can correct it using the same laser surgery techniques that are used to correct short sight, but rarely is it bad enough to justify on its own. These days, you can get specially weighted, soft contact lenses to correct it, if you don't want to wear glasses.

    Cataracts involve the fogging up of the lens in the eye, due to some sort of protein deposit/protein damage to its cells (I can't remember which). UV light is considered a causative agent, but hereditary plays a part, too, particularly in younger people developing them but statistically most of us will develop them eventually. (DH's best mate's sister had hers removed in her early '50's, having struggled with them for years. None of her siblings have them.)

    The lens is removed and replaced with a perspex one, usually with miraculous results as far as the patient is concerned, since they'll also correct short/long sight at the same time, if they can. For example, following cataract removal in his late 60's, my severely short-sighted dad suddenly didn't have to wear glasses for the first time in his adult life and, from our local beach, could see the mountains on the far side of Port Phillip Bay (something he couldn't recall seeing before).

    Back in my day, surgeons would operate on one eye at a time, about 3 months apart, to decrease the risks from any possible infection. The hardest/most painful part is that you can't move one eye without moving the other, so until they remove the bandages you have to sit with both eyes closed or the wound's edge will rub on the inside of your eye-lid. (I learned that the hard way when I had one eye lasered and tried to read with my good eye. Ouch!)

    Anyway, I'm trying to get a basic me-sock pattern sorted, using the same needle-size and yarn-weight and stitch-count, etc., each time, so that even if my eyes deteriorate considerably I can still knit socks. These are a good start on the Standard Sock pattern!



    Those socks are great. I see you do a "French heel" like I do (Sl1 K1 on the knitted rows).

    If it's any help, this is my standard sock recipe for 4-ply yarn on 2.5mm needles. If I need to increase the size, I'll do it it in 4 stitch increments.

    Me (UK size 5): CO 60st DH (UK size 11): CO 72st.
    Divide between 4 needles - I do 10st, 20st, 20st, and 10st - then join in round being careful not to twist. Work K2 P2 rib for 15 rows.
    Change to stocking stitch and continue knitting until 68 rnds (Me) or 72 rnds (DH) are completed.

    Divide for heel:

    K15 st (me) or K18 st (DH), turn slip 1 and purl back 29st (me) or 35st (DH). You'll have either 30 or 36 stitches on your working needle. Place a marker in the middle of the stitches on your needle. (I hang a row counter from the middle, attached to a stitch marker.)
    Count that row as "row 1". For rows 2 to 28 (me) or 36 (DH), work as follows:

    Knit rows: *Slip 1 K1, repeat from * to end
    Purl rows: Slip 1 purl to end

    In the meantime, use a plastic coil needle holder to keep needles 2 and 3 out of the way (and to stop those stitches slipping off).

    Turn heel:

    Start after you have completed an even numbered (Knit) row.
    Slip1 purl until you are 2 stitches after your centre marker, p2 tog p1 turn.
    Slip 1, k until you are 2 stitches after your centre marker, SSK, K1 turn.
    Slip 1, P until you are 3 stitches after your centre marker p2 tog p1 turn.
    Slip 1, k until you are 3 stitches after your centre marker, SSK, K1 turn.
    Repeat these two rows, taking in one more stitch each time you go beyond the central marker, until you've incorporated all the stitches from your heel flap, ending with a knit row.

    Gusset: Using a latch hook, pick up 16 st (me) 37 st (DH) from the left edge of the heel flap and slip onto a separate DPN. Place a marker (M1) on your DPN (I transfer my row counter to this point) then knit 5 stitches from needle 2. Taking a fresh DPN, finish knitting the stitches on needle 2 and knit all but 5 of the stitches on needle 3. (You should have one DPN spare now or 2 if it was a pack of 6.) With your last, spare DPN, knit across the remaining 5 stitches from needle 3, place a marker (M2) and then pick up the same number of stitches that you picked up from the other side of the flap. Knit across the stitches along the bottom of the flap, then back up the other side to M1.

    NOTE: when knitting into picked up stitches, knit through the back of the loop, to make them twist, to get a tighter stitch and thus limit holes.

    Work the gusset in two-round increments: Rnd 1, knit. Rnd 2 K to M2, slip the marker, k1, SSK. K to 3 stitches before M1, K2tog, K1. Continue decreasing in this fashion until you are back to the same number of stitches as your original cast on. When working with 5 needles gets a bit too fiddly, redistribute your knitting from 4 needles back to 3. Keep M1 in position, but you can lose M2 at this point.

    Work 48 rnds (me) 52 (DH). Needle 1 is the one with the marker.

    Toe:

    Rnd 1: K to 3 st before the end of needle 2, K2tog, K1. Start needle 3, K1 SSK, k to 3st before your marker, K2tog, K1.
    Rnd 2: Slip marker K1 SSK. K until you're back at the marker.
    Repeat these 2 rounds until 12 st (me) or 8 st (DH) remain, ending with a non-decrease round. Kitchener Stitch the toe together. (I do it, I can't describe it.)

    Cast on the second sock and knit to match.

    HTH

    - Pip

    ETA: Stitch gauge is 7 stitches to the inch.
    Last edited by PipneyJane; 19-04-2019 at 1:20 PM.
    "Be the type of woman that when you get out of bed in the morning, the devil says 'Oh crap. She's up.' "

    C.R.A.P R.O.L.L.Z. #47 Official Brain Harvesting Body Counter
    • CAFCGirl
    • By CAFCGirl 12th Apr 19, 4:52 PM
    • 8,661 Posts
    • 19,124 Thanks
    CAFCGirl
    Silly autocorrect on my Kindle.
    What I'd intended was 'Forager Vest'.....
    Basically a gathering\harvesting apron

    10 years and still don't have a clue what I'm doing

    Trying to get by on a single Emergency Services income
    Fashion On The Ration Coupons 14\66
    March Grocery Challenge £250\£46.77
    • Laura_Elsewhere
    • By Laura_Elsewhere 12th Apr 19, 5:04 PM
    • 328 Posts
    • 2,198 Thanks
    Laura_Elsewhere
    - Pip
    Originally posted by PipneyJane
    I'm going to just quote you, rather than bothering with the square brackets and backslashes

    " Do you have a shopping list on your phone of yarn that you actually need? If not yarn, then needles?"

    Ahahahaaaa! At the last count, four years ago I have over two hundred and fifty DPNs and two pairs of straights, and since then people have given me at least another 10 sets... and yarn, well acc'g Rav I have over 223 different kinds of yarn in my stash...

    So, well, "need"? this is like having a list of chocolate that I actually need, isn't it?

    Secondly, the nursey-eye stuff - mwah! You are lovely...
    Unfortunately... the astigmatism and cataracts really are sudden and very recent arrivals. My optician here went and double-checked in my previous records from two years earlier and nope, no sign of even the slightest hint in either eye of either condition. My dad mentioned it to our old optician, who retrieved my last eye-test there, five years ago and no sign at all of it. Kerataconus runs in the family so my eyes have always had the double-thorough extra-check-up to look for any sign of corneal or eyeball problems, too. So both conditions have spontaneously both arrived in both eyes in the space of two years... the problem is we simply have no idea what they intend to do, so to speak - they may stay like this for years and years, or they may develop rapidly, or one may do one and the other the other, or one eye ditto and the other ditto... we really do just have to wait and find out. It was only August last year that they were identified so no progress or stasis to track...
    No astigmatism anywhere in the family - short-sightedness in Dad, caused by the kerataconus (he had 20/20 vision til it developed in his early 30s) - and the only cataracts anywhere in the family are Dad, again linked to the kerataconus and only arriving very mildly in his very late 70s. So it isn't hereditary - even my parents' grandparents didn't wear glasses and some of them lived to older old-age. Mind you, I have psoriasis which also doesn't run in the family so I am a genetic freak in that way already...!
    My eyesight is already poor enough that I've never been suitable for laser surgery - they could improve it but I would still need specs even just for moving around at home, the whole time. Not much point going from strong perma-specs to medium perma-specs!
    I've known lots of great results from cataract surgery but also some very sad total failures with worsened vision, and good opticians are honest about it not always working... I just hope I'm lucky whenever it happens, and that I don't have to get to too bad a state before it happens...

    I just have to wait, really. No idea if they'll stay just like this or what...

    Your sock-pattern sounds a lot like mine - it's sl1-p1 on the wrong side, btw, on the heels, because I hate purling and it halves the number I have to do I use 2.25s with 4-ply as I like the denser result and it's much much harder-wearing. So I c/on 72 but on the 2.25s that works out to my size-6.5 nicely.
    I'm amused at how many other thing you use though - you must have been taught to knit by a modern knitter, with the coil to hold the foot-needles whilst knitting the heel, and the latch-hook for picking-up... I learnt by myself in my 30s from a 1920s Weldon's booklet of my late Gran's, and I just use four DPNs and the yarn, with a needle at the end to sew in the two yarn-ends...

    These are my notes from the blue socks:
    *****
    C/on 72 on 4mm and change to 2.25s. Knit 2/2 rib for 18 Rs.
    On R18, use last 18 and first 18 for heel, for 36 rows, sl first and alt purls. Turn at 15 left, and k1/p1 after (22).

    P/up 19 (11+19=30) and decr on 2nd and alt rounds.
    Knit 55 Rs.

    Arrange 18-36-18 and decr -4, knit 3 Rs, decr -4, knit 3Rs, decr -4, knit 3rs, decr -4 (four decr in all - pso/k2tog, both times).
    Then decr -4 every round until 8-16-8.

    Knitted-grafting:
    Cut yarn long.
    Set up: a. Front knit on, back purl on

    Fr p off
    Fr kn on
    B kn off
    B p on
    ie whatever you did last time, change it. Never two ons or offs in a row.
    *****


    One of the things I find really fascinating about knitting is how many different ways there are to arrive at pretty much the same result! I can't use circs, for example, because I can only knit with the RH needle anchored in a knitting-belt, or more usually just stuck into my waist area... but others can't use DPNs... and the range of different ways of doing thigns, firmly preferred by each knitter.

    It's worse than apple pie recipes!
    2019 Fashion on the Ration Challenge: 33.5 coupons left out of 66
    • Laura_Elsewhere
    • By Laura_Elsewhere 12th Apr 19, 7:29 PM
    • 328 Posts
    • 2,198 Thanks
    Laura_Elsewhere
    I've been reviewing my leggings collection, the cotton ones I cut off short and edge with crocheted lace to wear in summer under skirts, and I fear the patches need patches on the patches!

    So I think i shall invest in a couple of new pairs next time I pass Primark. I have 33.5 coupons left, so part of me is saying I shouldn't spend any more til six months of the year are past - but of course, that's not how to think, is it? I need to think of what I actually *need* to buy. It's not like last month's coupons are snatched back on the 1st!
    2019 Fashion on the Ration Challenge: 33.5 coupons left out of 66
    • PipneyJane
    • By PipneyJane 15th Apr 19, 7:49 AM
    • 1,055 Posts
    • 8,092 Thanks
    PipneyJane
    I'm going to just quote you, rather than bothering with the square brackets and backslashes

    " Do you have a shopping list on your phone of yarn that you actually need? If not yarn, then needles?"

    Ahahahaaaa! At the last count, four years ago I have over two hundred and fifty DPNs and two pairs of straights, and since then people have given me at least another 10 sets... and yarn, well acc'g Rav I have over 223 different kinds of yarn in my stash...

    So, well, "need"? this is like having a list of chocolate that I actually need, isn't it?

    Secondly, the nursey-eye stuff - mwah! You are lovely...
    Unfortunately... the astigmatism and cataracts really are sudden and very recent arrivals. My optician here went and double-checked in my previous records from two years earlier and nope, no sign of even the slightest hint in either eye of either condition. My dad mentioned it to our old optician, who retrieved my last eye-test there, five years ago and no sign at all of it. Kerataconus runs in the family so my eyes have always had the double-thorough extra-check-up to look for any sign of corneal or eyeball problems, too. So both conditions have spontaneously both arrived in both eyes in the space of two years... the problem is we simply have no idea what they intend to do, so to speak - they may stay like this for years and years, or they may develop rapidly, or one may do one and the other the other, or one eye ditto and the other ditto... we really do just have to wait and find out. It was only August last year that they were identified so no progress or stasis to track...
    No astigmatism anywhere in the family - short-sightedness in Dad, caused by the kerataconus (he had 20/20 vision til it developed in his early 30s) - and the only cataracts anywhere in the family are Dad, again linked to the kerataconus and only arriving very mildly in his very late 70s. So it isn't hereditary - even my parents' grandparents didn't wear glasses and some of them lived to older old-age. Mind you, I have psoriasis which also doesn't run in the family so I am a genetic freak in that way already...!
    My eyesight is already poor enough that I've never been suitable for laser surgery - they could improve it but I would still need specs even just for moving around at home, the whole time. Not much point going from strong perma-specs to medium perma-specs!
    I've known lots of great results from cataract surgery but also some very sad total failures with worsened vision, and good opticians are honest about it not always working... I just hope I'm lucky whenever it happens, and that I don't have to get to too bad a state before it happens...

    I just have to wait, really. No idea if they'll stay just like this or what...
    Originally posted by Laura_Elsewhere
    I'll keep my fingers crossed for you.

    Your sock-pattern sounds a lot like mine - it's sl1-p1 on the wrong side, btw, on the heels, because I hate purling and it halves the number I have to do I use 2.25s with 4-ply as I like the denser result and it's much much harder-wearing. So I c/on 72 but on the 2.25s that works out to my size-6.5 nicely.
    How many stitches to the inch do you get? I'm curious. I get 7 on my 2.5mm's. Tension is such a personal thing; we may be making the same tension while using two different needle sizes.

    I'm amused at how many other thing you use though - you must have been taught to knit by a modern knitter, with the coil to hold the foot-needles whilst knitting the heel, and the latch-hook for picking-up... I learnt by myself in my 30s from a 1920s Weldon's booklet of my late Gran's, and I just use four DPNs and the yarn, with a needle at the end to sew in the two yarn-ends...
    I was taught to knit by my grade 2 school teacher, in 1973, just before my 8th birthday. Everyone was taught, boys and girls. We learned "English style", i.e. holding the yarn in your right hand and holding the right needle from above, then my mum taught me "Australian style, where you tuck your thumb under the right needle, supporting its weight. The remainder of the hold and the knitting action is the same, but the Australian style means that you aren't dropping the needle to make a stitch, so makes it faster and more secure (you don't have to clamp the right needle into your armpit or waist to form a stitch or worse, hold the two needle tips with your left hand while you wrap the yarn with your right).


    Using a latch hook also came from mum, they're much more secure when used to pick up a dropped stitch than a crochet hook and you can force them through the tightest stitch in order to pick up yarn. Mine are designed for the bed of a knitting machine; I blagged half a dozen from a vendor at the Knit-and-Stitch Show a few years ago.



    These are my notes from the blue socks:
    *****
    C/on 72 on 4mm and change to 2.25s. Knit 2/2 rib for 18 Rs.
    On R18, use last 18 and first 18 for heel, for 36 rows, sl first and alt purls. Turn at 15 left, and k1/p1 after (22).

    P/up 19 (11+19=30) and decr on 2nd and alt rounds.
    Knit 55 Rs.

    Arrange 18-36-18 and decr -4, knit 3 Rs, decr -4, knit 3Rs, decr -4, knit 3rs, decr -4 (four decr in all - pso/k2tog, both times).
    Then decr -4 every round until 8-16-8.

    Knitted-grafting:
    Cut yarn long.
    Set up: a. Front knit on, back purl on

    Fr p off
    Fr kn on
    B kn off
    B p on
    ie whatever you did last time, change it. Never two ons or offs in a row.
    *****
    My grafting is pretty much the same as yours. I just ran out of time to describe it.

    I learned to knit socks in 2006 from a kit I purchased after years of reading the Yarn Harlot rabbit on about knitting socks: one set Addi 8" dpns, 2 stitch markers, 100g of Opal sock yarn and a photocopied handout, that I think also came from Opal. (If you can read German, I think they used to print their sock pattern on their ball bands.) I've knitted so many pairs of socks now that I've just internalised that pattern, with a few modifications (the French heel, picking up an extra stitch in the "corner" of the gusset, twisting the first row of stitches).


    One of the things I find really fascinating about knitting is how many different ways there are to arrive at pretty much the same result! I can't use circs, for example, because I can only knit with the RH needle anchored in a knitting-belt, or more usually just stuck into my waist area... but others can't use DPNs... and the range of different ways of doing things, firmly preferred by each knitter.

    It's worse than apple pie recipes!
    It is indeed! I used 12" long DPN's to knit the collar of my first jumper, when I was 10, and hated them; too many points, in too many directions, all getting in the way AND stitches slipping off. (I don't remember when I got my first circular needle, but I probably would never have finished the collar of another jumper without one.) When I got the sock kit with 8" DPN's, I dreaded using them but discovered that shorter DPN's are much less intrusive - I didn't get spiked once - and my preference is now for 6" ones.

    - Pip
    "Be the type of woman that when you get out of bed in the morning, the devil says 'Oh crap. She's up.' "

    C.R.A.P R.O.L.L.Z. #47 Official Brain Harvesting Body Counter
    • CAFCGirl
    • By CAFCGirl 15th Apr 19, 8:32 AM
    • 8,661 Posts
    • 19,124 Thanks
    CAFCGirl
    Spent coupons!
    Another 2 yarn cakes from the most positively retro haberdashery type place - wool focused but also selling insoles, gift wrap by the sheet, insoles, thermals and exercise books - like what I remember post offices used to sell. Was quaint and compact on space, floor to ceiling.

    The yarn is definitely my colourway, greens, blues, mauve purple blue. I haven't a clue what I'll do with it though..... It was just too good a bargain to pass up.
    I was then also gifted from my mum 7 balls of yarn she got as a blanket set but isn't likely to use. So that's added to the stash.

    I'm off to hers today to demonstrate loom knitting. I might crack out a hat to show her which can then be donated on in the autumn to the homeless charities.

    I'm pleased the weather seems to be improving so I can start wearing my linen dungarees again..... They don't really work in cold weather unfortunately.
    Last edited by CAFCGirl; 16-04-2019 at 1:54 PM.

    10 years and still don't have a clue what I'm doing

    Trying to get by on a single Emergency Services income
    Fashion On The Ration Coupons 14\66
    March Grocery Challenge £250\£46.77
    • Laura_Elsewhere
    • By Laura_Elsewhere 15th Apr 19, 10:28 AM
    • 328 Posts
    • 2,198 Thanks
    Laura_Elsewhere



    How many stitches to the inch do you get? I'm curious. I get 7 on my 2.5mm's. Tension is such a personal thing; we may be making the same tension while using two different needle sizes.
    Originally posted by PipneyJane
    Checking three different pairs, I seem to knit to around 9.5 to 11 stitches per inch, depending on the yarn, and sometimes I use 2mm if I've not got four 2.25s - much tighter than most sock patterns suggest!

    I was taught to knit by my grade 2 school teacher, in 1973, just before my 8th birthday. Everyone was taught, boys and girls. We learned "English style", i.e. holding the yarn in your right hand and holding the right needle from above, then my mum taught me "Australian style, where you tuck your thumb under the right needle, supporting its weight. The remainder of the hold and the knitting action is the same, but the Australian style means that you aren't dropping the needle to make a stitch, so makes it faster and more secure (you don't have to clamp the right needle into your armpit or waist to form a stitch or worse, hold the two needle tips with your left hand while you wrap the yarn with your right).
    Maybe it's my tighter tension but I don't recall the last time I dropped a stitch or lost one in transit - I don't have to hold the RH needle at all, so I just have one hand doing one thing, left moving the needle and right moving the yarn, and the movement comes from the shoulder so doesn't lead to RSI and if it's straight stocking-stitch then it's a handy 55-60 stitches per minute, slower of course on ribbing or shaping or whatever.

    It's whatever works best - like love or the kitchen clock, as they say!


    I have been tidying up, and found TWO pairs of leggings still with their tags on, so it's a good thing I didn't go into town this morning and waste coupons buying a couple of pairs! I shall wash them and then chop them off short, edge the cut edges, and I think I shall start by sewing on a patch made from the lower leg, onto the inner thighs, so they wear out very much more slowly, rather than waiting til they get holes and then patching onto worn-out thin fabric...

    I'm pleased to have saved the coupons, though! And a real eye-opener for me not to get complacent, as I would have sworn I didn't have bought-but-unworn clothes in this tiny flat!
    2019 Fashion on the Ration Challenge: 33.5 coupons left out of 66
    • goingforanewlife
    • By goingforanewlife 16th Apr 19, 11:20 AM
    • 28 Posts
    • 312 Thanks
    goingforanewlife
    I have just discovered this thread and it sounds a fun way of controlling my expenditure on clothing, also, as a avid reader of WWII novels I think it would be fascinating to try to experience some of the difficulties they faced. As it is April I have added up the coupons I have used so far and I taken them from the 66 coupons allowance therefore have 44 coupons left for the rest of the year.
    • CAFCGirl
    • By CAFCGirl 16th Apr 19, 1:54 PM
    • 8,661 Posts
    • 19,124 Thanks
    CAFCGirl
    I have just discovered this thread and it sounds a fun way of controlling my expenditure on clothing, also, as a avid reader of WWII novels I think it would be fascinating to try to experience some of the difficulties they faced. As it is April I have added up the coupons I have used so far and I taken them from the 66 coupons allowance therefore have 44 coupons left for the rest of the year.
    Originally posted by goingforanewlife
    Welcome

    10 years and still don't have a clue what I'm doing

    Trying to get by on a single Emergency Services income
    Fashion On The Ration Coupons 14\66
    March Grocery Challenge £250\£46.77
    • Laura_Elsewhere
    • By Laura_Elsewhere 16th Apr 19, 4:47 PM
    • 328 Posts
    • 2,198 Thanks
    Laura_Elsewhere
    I have just discovered this thread and it sounds a fun way of controlling my expenditure on clothing, also, as a avid reader of WWII novels I think it would be fascinating to try to experience some of the difficulties they faced. As it is April I have added up the coupons I have used so far and I taken them from the 66 coupons allowance therefore have 44 coupons left for the rest of the year.
    Originally posted by goingforanewlife
    Oh, it is great fun!

    I hadn't thought til I read your post, but gosh, just picture it - we could be po-faced and solemnly just reducing our spending, grimly totting up and castigating ourselves, and struggling onwards, bickering about cost versus quality...

    Instead of which we have the coupon system to save arguments, we have some very inspiring women before us whose situation compared to our luxury really helps encourage us to think more, and we have a cheerful group who work by being friendly and nice and positive about the challenge!

    Coo, ain't we the lucky ones?!

    ****

    Also - I am buying some lurex thread to add to yarn I already have, to knit a doubt-excluder* for a friend starting a new, scary but good chapter in her life in her 50s... but lurex doesn't count as yarn, does it? I mean... it's thread... isn't it?

    *a doubt-excluder is like a draught-excluder, but helps stop doubts creeping in. It looks quite a lot like a lacy scarf...
    2019 Fashion on the Ration Challenge: 33.5 coupons left out of 66
    • PipneyJane
    • By PipneyJane 17th Apr 19, 12:15 PM
    • 1,055 Posts
    • 8,092 Thanks
    PipneyJane
    I have just discovered this thread and it sounds a fun way of controlling my expenditure on clothing, also, as a avid reader of WWII novels I think it would be fascinating to try to experience some of the difficulties they faced. As it is April I have added up the coupons I have used so far and I taken them from the 66 coupons allowance therefore have 44 coupons left for the rest of the year.
    Originally posted by goingforanewlife
    Welcome!

    I have to confess that I'm fascinated by the social history aspect of WW2: how people lived; what they cooked; growing your own veg; the clothes, etc. I loved reading Simon Garfield's books, We Are At War, etc, which used Mass Observation diariy entries from the period.

    Oh, it is great fun!

    I hadn't thought til I read your post, but gosh, just picture it - we could be po-faced and solemnly just reducing our spending, grimly totting up and castigating ourselves, and struggling onwards, bickering about cost versus quality...

    Instead of which we have the coupon system to save arguments, we have some very inspiring women before us whose situation compared to our luxury really helps encourage us to think more, and we have a cheerful group who work by being friendly and nice and positive about the challenge!

    Coo, ain't we the lucky ones?!

    ****

    Also - I am buying some lurex thread to add to yarn I already have, to knit a doubt-excluder* for a friend starting a new, scary but good chapter in her life in her 50s... but lurex doesn't count as yarn, does it? I mean... it's thread... isn't it?

    *a doubt-excluder is like a draught-excluder, but helps stop doubts creeping in. It looks quite a lot like a lacy scarf...
    Originally posted by Laura_Elsewhere
    Laura, sounds lovely. A hug in a scarf.

    As far as I know, the lurex yarn is coupon free. I've never been able to find out the coupon cost for non-woollen yarns, hence the note in the first post about the cost only applying to natural fibres. (When I went to the WW2 clothing exhibition a couple of years ago, they had a rayon yarn on display. Their sign didn't give the coupon cost, only that it was cheaper.)

    - Pip
    "Be the type of woman that when you get out of bed in the morning, the devil says 'Oh crap. She's up.' "

    C.R.A.P R.O.L.L.Z. #47 Official Brain Harvesting Body Counter
    • Laura_Elsewhere
    • By Laura_Elsewhere 18th Apr 19, 3:03 PM
    • 328 Posts
    • 2,198 Thanks
    Laura_Elsewhere
    New technique for Not Spending Coupons (or money!) buying yarn I don't technically actually need: I took a jar of homemade jam into the brilliant little independent knitting shop and gave it to the nice lady who runs it

    It meant I could go in and wallow, without feeling bad that I didn't buy anything - she seemed happy with the idea!
    2019 Fashion on the Ration Challenge: 33.5 coupons left out of 66
    • PollyWollyDoodle
    • By PollyWollyDoodle 18th Apr 19, 3:43 PM
    • 1,249 Posts
    • 25,613 Thanks
    PollyWollyDoodle
    I really love the idea of a 'doubt excluder', what a great gift!



    I am inspired by all the knitting talk. I would love to knit 'Continental Style', which I think is what you are describing, Laura - I do know someone who learned to do this but I think I would find it very hard to change now, it is much faster than 'traditional' knitting I believe. I have had to think about what I do, because it's instinctive - I hold the left needle in my left hand, and I somehow grasp the right needle in my right hand and manipulate the wool with my fingers ... I couldn't really describe it, I don't let go of the needles at any point and I knit quite fast, but I'm not sure if it's a proper technique!



    I knitted my first pair of socks about three years ago after getting a book on sock knitting for Christmas, I was thrilled with them and then for some reason since then every time I have tried it has come out too big, too small or too floppy and I've given up. I might have another go following the notes from Laura and Pip above.



    All the talk of wartime books has made me revisit my favourite, Nella Last's War (the basis for the wonderful Victoria Wood film 'Housewife, 49'). She could sew, and even had an electric sewing machine and at the start of the war she is making cot blankets out of what she calls 'tailor's pieces' - scrap fabric, I assume. I started re-reading it this morning and had to stop or I would have got nothing else done!
    "Inconceivable". "You keep using that word. I do not think it means what you think it means."
    • diminua
    • By diminua 18th Apr 19, 9:54 PM
    • 8 Posts
    • 40 Thanks
    diminua
    I have to declare another 2 coupons gone on underwear - which takes me down to 52 now, which still seems comfortable given how much I already own. I notice by the way (not completely incidentally) that sanitary towels were not rationed.
    • PipneyJane
    • By PipneyJane 19th Apr 19, 1:18 PM
    • 1,055 Posts
    • 8,092 Thanks
    PipneyJane
    New technique for Not Spending Coupons (or money!) buying yarn I don't technically actually need: I took a jar of homemade jam into the brilliant little independent knitting shop and gave it to the nice lady who runs it

    It meant I could go in and wallow, without feeling bad that I didn't buy anything - she seemed happy with the idea!
    Originally posted by Laura_Elsewhere

    That was a sweet thing to do. (No pun intended.)


    I really love the idea of a 'doubt excluder', what a great gift!



    I am inspired by all the knitting talk. I would love to knit 'Continental Style', which I think is what you are describing, Laura - I do know someone who learned to do this but I think I would find it very hard to change now, it is much faster than 'traditional' knitting I believe. I have had to think about what I do, because it's instinctive - I hold the left needle in my left hand, and I somehow grasp the right needle in my right hand and manipulate the wool with my fingers ... I couldn't really describe it, I don't let go of the needles at any point and I knit quite fast, but I'm not sure if it's a proper technique!
    Originally posted by PollyWollyDoodle
    Laura describes an older British style, not Continental but something that existed in areas where women knitted for a living, while they were doing other jobs. They’d wear a “knitting belt”, into which their needles were jammed, frequently using one hand to do their day job - herd goats or whatever - while using the other to knit as they walked.

    In Continental knitting, you hold the yarn in your left hand, similar to the way you would when you crochet. I’d did a quick search of YouTube and this was the most popular video teaching Continental Knitting.

    Again, however, there are plenty of variants. My friend, Kate, is Ukrainian and, while she holds the yarn in her left hand, her technique involves picking at the yarn with her right needle, regardless of whether she’s knitting or purling. She moves the needle round the yarn not the yarn round the needle, and is very fast.

    (I can knit Continental, but my purling is terrible and not comfortable. Ribbing is a nightmare.)



    I knitted my first pair of socks about three years ago after getting a book on sock knitting for Christmas, I was thrilled with them and then for some reason since then every time I have tried it has come out too big, too small or too floppy and I've given up. I might have another go following the notes from Laura and Pip above.
    Dare I mention the dreaded T-word? You really have to match the tension specified in the pattern (at least the stitches per inch), even if that means starting over a couple of times, with different sized needles. Until you’ve found your “forever pattern” formula, I’d knit the cuff and then an inch or two of my first sock, then count my stitches per inch. If it doesn’t match the gauge specified by the pattern’s author, rip it out and start again. You will have only wasted a couple of hours, at that point.

    For a good, basic pattern, you’re welcome to use mine, quoted above. I’ve edited it to add my tension. It has been heavily influenced by Stephanie Pearl-McPhee’s book, Knitting Rules. (She’s the “Yarn Harlot”.)

    All the talk of wartime books has made me revisit my favourite, Nella Last's War (the basis for the wonderful Victoria Wood film 'Housewife, 49'). She could sew, and even had an electric sewing machine and at the start of the war she is making cot blankets out of what she calls 'tailor's pieces' - scrap fabric, I assume. I started re-reading it this morning and had to stop or I would have got nothing else done!
    I’ve read Nella Last’s War. Victoria Wood did her proud. I’ve also got vague memories of visiting as a child, the sculpture garden her son Cliff created in the Dandenongs outside Melbourne. (I’m pretty sure it was his work.)

    - Pip
    "Be the type of woman that when you get out of bed in the morning, the devil says 'Oh crap. She's up.' "

    C.R.A.P R.O.L.L.Z. #47 Official Brain Harvesting Body Counter
    • Laura_Elsewhere
    • By Laura_Elsewhere 19th Apr 19, 2:26 PM
    • 328 Posts
    • 2,198 Thanks
    Laura_Elsewhere
    I have to declare another 2 coupons gone on underwear - which takes me down to 52 now, which still seems comfortable given how much I already own. I notice by the way (not completely incidentally) that sanitary towels were not rationed.
    Originally posted by diminua
    New undies were always a present at Easter - my parents both grew up with the custom.... I've asked friends over the years and only a few had the same tradition, but apparently it's a remnant of an ancient tradition of people renewing their baptismal vows at Easter, which involved wearing a linen shift - so possibly people associated new body-linen with this season, and by the 1970s it had turned into new knickers for a little girl!

    I still want new undies, even now, though... maybe next year I shall plan ahead and include just one really nice pretty pair of Easter undies on my coupon-count! And that would make them more special, too...

    A good point re sanitary towels - one of those barely-mentioned things there are many myths about, but I suspect in the war a lot of women made their own and just managed. I know the disposable sort weren't around (at all? or just commonly?) til well after the war, much like disposable nappies weren't - but I think a lot of women probably bought pads made by someone else out of ideal fabrics and fillings, but during wartime had to make their own from whatever was available.

    As it's such a huuuuge waste of plastics and chlorine bleach, I do want to move from bought towels to homemade washable cloth ones, but can't quite bring myself to inflict on my chap the essential lidded container of used, rinsed pads soaking in cold water awaiting washing - even though a) I know he won't mind and will wonder why I think he would, b) it isn't anything shameful but perfectly natural and c) as you rinse them out as soon as you've used them, the waiting-for-wash container wouldn't be a vile thing and d) my chap has a child AND was house-husband when said child was 2-4 years old so is entirely familiar with bodily functions, quite apart from having recently been doing a LOT of bodily care for said son who is now home from hospital but did need a lot of personal care...

    I feel so brainwashed! But still, society does pile on the pressure, that really periods should be invisible, unsmellable, unmentionable and ideally just non-existent in some convenient way.
    I can't roller-skate and don't have any white jeans, though...
    2019 Fashion on the Ration Challenge: 33.5 coupons left out of 66
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