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    • freebiequeen
    • By freebiequeen 21st Dec 17, 2:18 PM
    • 25 Posts
    • 3 Thanks
    freebiequeen
    Does anyone know of a UK stockbroker that starts trading at 8am, as opposed to at 8.15am? (The shares I wanted to sell reached my target at 8:06 this morning, but, by 8:15, they!!!8217;d dropped substantially).
    • Economic
    • By Economic 21st Dec 17, 2:30 PM
    • 247 Posts
    • 226 Thanks
    Economic
    Does anyone know of a UK stockbroker that starts trading at 8am, as opposed to at 8.15am? (The shares I wanted to sell reached my target at 8:06 this morning, but, by 8:15, they’d dropped substantially).
    Originally posted by freebiequeen
    I think that they all start trading at 8am! Are you talking about a limit order?
    • freebiequeen
    • By freebiequeen 21st Dec 17, 5:48 PM
    • 25 Posts
    • 3 Thanks
    freebiequeen
    Yes, I am - apologies! At my broker, limit orders are no longer triggered until 8.15am, as a result of which, my shares were not sold when my limit was reached at 8.06 this morning.
    • george4064
    • By george4064 22nd Dec 17, 12:03 AM
    • 936 Posts
    • 1,017 Thanks
    george4064
    Yes, I am - apologies! At my broker, limit orders are no longer triggered until 8.15am, as a result of which, my shares were not sold when my limit was reached at 8.06 this morning.
    Originally posted by freebiequeen
    What stock did you have a limit order for? And for how many shares?
    "If you aren’t willing to own a stock for ten years, don’t even think about owning it for ten minutes” Warren Buffett

    Save £12k in 2016 - #045 £10,358.81/£12,000 (86%)
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    • Economic
    • By Economic 22nd Dec 17, 11:13 AM
    • 247 Posts
    • 226 Thanks
    Economic
    Yes, I am - apologies! At my broker, limit orders are no longer triggered until 8.15am, as a result of which, my shares were not sold when my limit was reached at 8.06 this morning.
    Originally posted by freebiequeen
    Not triggering limit orders until 8:15am probably makes sense most of the time as the bid-offer spread is fairly large early in the morning so you might not get a good deal. Are you sure that the price you were looking at was the bid price and not the mid price?
    • imsi
    • By imsi 9th Feb 18, 2:28 PM
    • 229 Posts
    • 51 Thanks
    imsi
    What is the cheapest way of selling shares as a one off transaction?
    Would I need to notify/pay Equinity when selling shares that they are managing?
    • george4064
    • By george4064 9th Feb 18, 2:44 PM
    • 936 Posts
    • 1,017 Thanks
    george4064
    What is the cheapest way of selling shares as a one off transaction?
    Would I need to notify/pay Equinity when selling shares that they are managing?
    Originally posted by imsi


    With whom do you hold the shares with? and in what format?
    "If you aren’t willing to own a stock for ten years, don’t even think about owning it for ten minutes” Warren Buffett

    Save £12k in 2016 - #045 £10,358.81/£12,000 (86%)
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    Save £12k in 2018 - #004 £3,330.20/£12,000 (28%)
    • bowlhead99
    • By bowlhead99 9th Feb 18, 3:03 PM
    • 7,824 Posts
    • 14,291 Thanks
    bowlhead99
    What is the cheapest way of selling shares as a one off transaction?
    Would I need to notify/pay Equinity when selling shares that they are managing?
    Originally posted by imsi
    If you hold the shares in paper form the cheapest way to sell them is to open up an online account with a cheap execution-only broker like www.x-o.co.uk and then send them the share certificates so they can be registered to your online account, and then place an order to sell the shares for a quite low dealing fee of only a few pounds per transaction.

    If you hold the shares electronically in an online account with a broker or nominee provider, the cheapest way to sell might be to transfer them to another broker (such as x-o mentioned above) and then sell, although this may incur 'transfer out' fees from your current service provider. So it might be cheaper just to have whoever is currently holding them for you, to sell them for you. Certainly that would be quicker so avoids possible market price reductions while you are faffing about moving them to the place with the cheapest sale fees.

    Equinity are the registrar for a lot of public listed companies, i.e. they maintain the register of shareholders which the companies pay them to do. If you buy or sell shares on the stock market with a stock broker, after the trade has been completed the broker or the stock exchange will inform equinity (or whoever the registrar is for that particular company - e.g. computershare, capita etc) so that the master shareholder register can be updated. You don't need to inform equinity that you have bought or sold or pay them anything if you are not using them as your broker to place the trade onto the stock market. The company will pay them a fee for ongoing registrar service.

    However on top of that registry service for the company, Equinity also offer a nominee and dealing service like other brokers do, and some people who own shares in just one or two companies and don't want to buy and sell shares on the wider stockmarkets or had acquired then through a work sharesave scheme might have Equinity look after them on shareview dealing platform rather than involve a separate stockbroker service or need to keep their paper certificates themselves. If your shares are currently 'with' Equinity, you could ask them to sell the shares in the market for you (paying some fee for that transaction) or transfer your shares to another broker to do the sales work for you.
    Last edited by bowlhead99; 09-02-2018 at 3:08 PM.
    • Lungboy
    • By Lungboy 16th Feb 18, 9:58 AM
    • 1,355 Posts
    • 1,308 Thanks
    Lungboy
    What's the difference between share class? For example, with Cavendish you can buy both Architas MA Passive Growth Acc A and Architas MA Passive Growth Acc D. The D fund has a lower cost, but other than that they seem identical. Similarly, Blackrock Consensus 85 D vs 85 I, they look absolutely the same to me.

    e: if you download the Blackrock paperwork for Consensus 85 I from Trustnet you get 85 D!
    Last edited by Lungboy; 16-02-2018 at 10:04 AM.
    • bowlhead99
    • By bowlhead99 16th Feb 18, 10:02 AM
    • 7,824 Posts
    • 14,291 Thanks
    bowlhead99
    What's the difference between share class? For example, with Cavendish you can buy both Architas MA Passive Growth Acc A and Architas MA Passive Growth Acc D. The D fund has a lower cost, but other than that they seem identical. Similarly, Blackrock Consensus 85 D vs 85 I, they look absolutely the same to me.
    Originally posted by Lungboy

    The difference is the running costs/ management fees. The cheaper class may have restrictions on where you can buy it, minimum holding size or minimum ol amounts for one-off/ regular contributions. A lot of the DIY platforms offer the 'institutional' version without you needing to invest millions because collectively with their other customers, you do have millions.

    Buy the cheapest version available at your choice of platform. Some platforms have exclusive classes (or semi-exclusive) that are hard to get elsewhere.
    • Lungboy
    • By Lungboy 16th Feb 18, 10:08 AM
    • 1,355 Posts
    • 1,308 Thanks
    Lungboy
    The difference is the running costs/ management fees. The cheaper class may have restrictions on where you can buy it, minimum holding size or minimum ol amounts for one-off/ regular contributions. A lot of the DIY platforms offer the 'institutional' version without you needing to invest millions because collectively with their other customers, you do have millions.

    Buy the cheapest version available at your choice of platform. Some platforms have exclusive classes (or semi-exclusive) that are hard to get elsewhere.
    Originally posted by bowlhead99
    Fantastic, thanks very much.
    • Lungboy
    • By Lungboy 16th Feb 18, 1:25 PM
    • 1,355 Posts
    • 1,308 Thanks
    Lungboy
    Another quick question: Is there a quick way to find out which platform a particular fund is available on? For example, HSBC Global Strategy Adventurous doesn't appear on Cavendish, HL or Best Invest lists. Similarly, Blackrock Aquila Emerging Markets isn't on any of them either.
    • Saver67
    • By Saver67 24th Feb 18, 2:26 PM
    • 1 Posts
    • 0 Thanks
    Saver67
    Savers56
    Hi
    What do you think about micro investing?
    • Lungboy
    • By Lungboy 4th Mar 18, 11:11 PM
    • 1,355 Posts
    • 1,308 Thanks
    Lungboy
    Is there any way to get an idea of the risk level of something that's too new to have a risk rating?
    • Thrugelmir
    • By Thrugelmir 4th Mar 18, 11:21 PM
    • 58,449 Posts
    • 51,823 Thanks
    Thrugelmir
    Is there any way to get an idea of the risk level of something that's too new to have a risk rating?
    Originally posted by Lungboy
    Read the Key Information Document for the fund.
    Financial disasters happen when the last person who can remember what went wrong last time has left the building.
    • Linton
    • By Linton 5th Mar 18, 9:13 AM
    • 9,373 Posts
    • 9,505 Thanks
    Linton
    Another quick question: Is there a quick way to find out which platform a particular fund is available on? For example, HSBC Global Strategy Adventurous doesn't appear on Cavendish, HL or Best Invest lists. Similarly, Blackrock Aquila Emerging Markets isn't on any of them either.
    Originally posted by Lungboy
    Blackrock Aquila funds are pension funds not OEIC/UTs so you wont find them on the general platfoms. HSBC GS Adventurous was only launched in August 2017 so it is very early days. If you want it I suggest you ask your platform provider, I believe they may well take on missing mainstream funds on request.

    There is no quick way to find out which OEIC/UT fund is available on which platform.
    • Lungboy
    • By Lungboy 9th Mar 18, 4:28 PM
    • 1,355 Posts
    • 1,308 Thanks
    Lungboy
    Blackrock Aquila funds are pension funds not OEIC/UTs so you wont find them on the general platfoms. HSBC GS Adventurous was only launched in August 2017 so it is very early days. If you want it I suggest you ask your platform provider, I believe they may well take on missing mainstream funds on request.

    There is no quick way to find out which OEIC/UT fund is available on which platform.
    Originally posted by Linton
    Thanks for that. I'm not after HSBC adventurous myself, it was just an example of one I'd seen mentioned on here but couldn't find anywhere. I missed the rather important detail of Aquila being a pension fund It's a shame there's nowhere that you can look up where each fund is available.

    I'm likely heading down the "single global tracker (Vanguard global all cap) plus bonds" route for my SIPP. For the bonds portion, should they also be diversified global bonds, or would UK based bonds be reasonable, and should they be short term or aimed for my intended retirement horizon (15 years+)? Finally, is there any meaningful difference between gilts and bonds for this portion of my portfolio?
    • Lungboy
    • By Lungboy 20th Mar 18, 10:07 AM
    • 1,355 Posts
    • 1,308 Thanks
    Lungboy
    If the KIID for a fund and the website for the platform selling it show a different OCF for the same fund, who am I to believe? For example, Liontrust Monthly Income Bond Fund Class P Gross Accumulation shows as 0.34% OCF on its KIID, but on AJ Bell (the only platform I can find selling it) its OCF is 0.46%.
    • Malthusian
    • By Malthusian 20th Mar 18, 12:43 PM
    • 4,071 Posts
    • 6,379 Thanks
    Malthusian
    OCFs fluctuate because they include dealing costs, and therefore depend partly on how much buying and selling the manager has done in the last year. If you're looking at one in isolation, use the most recent. If you're comparing OCFs between two funds to decide which to buy, just make sure you use the same source for both.
    • Linton
    • By Linton 20th Mar 18, 12:56 PM
    • 9,373 Posts
    • 9,505 Thanks
    Linton
    If the KIID for a fund and the website for the platform selling it show a different OCF for the same fund, who am I to believe? For example, Liontrust Monthly Income Bond Fund Class P Gross Accumulation shows as 0.34% OCF on its KIID, but on AJ Bell (the only platform I can find selling it) its OCF is 0.46%.
    Originally posted by Lungboy
    OCFs vary over time depending on the actual costs incurred and because they are a % of the net asset value which itself can change. It looks like the latest KIID only came out in Feb 2018 so its quite possible that the AJ Bell data hasnt been updated.

    Trustnet gives the OCF as 0.34%.
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