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  • FIRST POST
    • DainiusK
    • By DainiusK 10th Nov 18, 3:35 PM
    • 6Posts
    • 1Thanks
    DainiusK
    E.on 2604kwh used per 43days
    • #1
    • 10th Nov 18, 3:35 PM
    E.on 2604kwh used per 43days 10th Nov 18 at 3:35 PM
    So i've recenly ( 23sept) moved to new 2 bedroom flat with double glazing windows and all, electric heating. And just now received estimated bill from 23sept to 5nov so that add ups to 43 days. which says that they estimated that i've used 1613kwh per 43 day period. Which it thought might be estimate error, so i just checked the meter and at the moment of writing this it's 34333, the reading which was handed to me by landlord when i started my tenancy was 31729 so that adds up to 2604 kw/h used per 43 days about 450 pounds. im rarely home, heating is turned on only two times per day for 3.5 hours. There's even been a week when i had no heating at all due to boiler issues. The stuff i have is not much aswel:
    1 TV, 1 Computer, 1 Fridge freezer, 1 Washing machine and few phones. All lightning is LED power savers. I have all electric heating tho with 5 radiators in the flat.


    Im really distraught have no idea what's going on and how to proceed, is it possible i used that much energy per such short period ? Any tips or help would be greatly appreciated!
    Last edited by DainiusK; 10-11-2018 at 3:35 PM. Reason: Just added some details
Page 1
    • Robin9
    • By Robin9 10th Nov 18, 3:38 PM
    • 3,280 Posts
    • 2,134 Thanks
    Robin9
    • #2
    • 10th Nov 18, 3:38 PM
    • #2
    • 10th Nov 18, 3:38 PM
    Are you sure that there's not a decimal point here and the readings are 0003433decimal3 and 0003172decimal9 ie 254 units ?


    This is a wake up call for you - read those meters at least monthly, keep you own records, check readings against bills (do not accept estimates) and understand those bills.
    Last edited by Robin9; 10-11-2018 at 3:45 PM. Reason: Wake Up Call added
    Never pay on an estimated bill
    • DainiusK
    • By DainiusK 10th Nov 18, 3:45 PM
    • 6 Posts
    • 1 Thanks
    DainiusK
    • #3
    • 10th Nov 18, 3:45 PM
    • #3
    • 10th Nov 18, 3:45 PM
    Are you sure that there's not a decimal point here and the readings are 0003433decimal3 and 0003172decimal9 ie 254 units ?
    Originally posted by Robin9
    Thanks for your reply. I've just double checked and it's only 5 numbers which are 34333
    • Robin9
    • By Robin9 10th Nov 18, 3:48 PM
    • 3,280 Posts
    • 2,134 Thanks
    Robin9
    • #4
    • 10th Nov 18, 3:48 PM
    • #4
    • 10th Nov 18, 3:48 PM
    What sort of meter do you have - the old clock or cyclometer type, or a modern digital ?


    What is your heating - usually I would expect an E7 tariff with all electric ?

    You say the landlord gave you readings - you should have read your own meter and given them to the existing supplier when you moved in.
    Last edited by Robin9; 10-11-2018 at 3:51 PM.
    Never pay on an estimated bill
    • matelodave
    • By matelodave 10th Nov 18, 3:55 PM
    • 3,910 Posts
    • 2,467 Thanks
    matelodave
    • #5
    • 10th Nov 18, 3:55 PM
    • #5
    • 10th Nov 18, 3:55 PM
    Did you check the meter yourself when you moved in and give the reading to your supplier.

    Never let someone else do it for you, you can't be certain that they've done it correctly.

    As Robin says, read your meter yourself at least every month, keep your own records and send the reading into your suppplier. Make sure the supplier uses your readings and get any estimates corrected immediately. Do not pay an estimated bill.

    It's also a good idea to download bills and statements as PDF files and save them just in case the suppliers system crashes (which they do more often that you'd expect). It's very difficult to get hold of previous bills if something goes wrong.

    Spending five minute once a month checking your bills, raedings and DD's might save you hours of frustration and aggro in the future
    Last edited by matelodave; 10-11-2018 at 3:57 PM.
    Love makes the world go round - beer make it go round even faster
    Look after our planet - it's the only one with beer
    • DainiusK
    • By DainiusK 10th Nov 18, 3:59 PM
    • 6 Posts
    • 1 Thanks
    DainiusK
    • #6
    • 10th Nov 18, 3:59 PM
    • #6
    • 10th Nov 18, 3:59 PM
    What sort of meter do you have - the old clock or cyclometer type, or a modern digital ?


    What is your heating - usually I would expect an E7 tariff with all electric ?

    You say the landlord gave you readings - you should have read your own meter and given them to the existing supplier when you moved in.
    Originally posted by Robin9

    Im very bad at this kind of stuff, should've checked it myself when moved in, but trusted my landlord and that might've been very big mistake andstupid of me. Im really not sure what kind of tariff i would have is there a way i could check i do now that i have an E.ON energy plan and pay Normal tariff 16,95 per kwh
    • DainiusK
    • By DainiusK 10th Nov 18, 4:00 PM
    • 6 Posts
    • 1 Thanks
    DainiusK
    • #7
    • 10th Nov 18, 4:00 PM
    • #7
    • 10th Nov 18, 4:00 PM
    Did you check the meter yourself when you moved in and give the reading to your supplier.

    Never let someone else do it for you, you can't be certain that they've done it correctly.

    As Robin says, read your meter yourself at least every month, keep your own records and send the reading into your suppplier. Make sure the supplier uses your readings and get any estimates corrected immediately. Do not pay an estimated bill.

    It's also a good idea to download bills and statements as PDF files and save them just in case the suppliers system crashes (which they do more often that you'd expect). It's very difficult to get hold of previous bills if something goes wrong.

    Spending five minute once a month checking your bills, raedings and DD's might save you hours of frustration and aggro in the future
    Originally posted by matelodave
    After this bill im going to check it everysingle evening and taking notes. This was my wake up call, never had any issue of this kind before in my life
    • Robin9
    • By Robin9 10th Nov 18, 4:01 PM
    • 3,280 Posts
    • 2,134 Thanks
    Robin9
    • #8
    • 10th Nov 18, 4:01 PM
    • #8
    • 10th Nov 18, 4:01 PM
    It's possible the previous tenant gave a low reading to the landlord !
    Never pay on an estimated bill
    • DainiusK
    • By DainiusK 10th Nov 18, 4:05 PM
    • 6 Posts
    • 1 Thanks
    DainiusK
    • #9
    • 10th Nov 18, 4:05 PM
    • #9
    • 10th Nov 18, 4:05 PM
    It's possible the previous tenant gave a low reading to the landlord !
    Originally posted by Robin9
    I really hope that this is not true, couldn't think that a person could do such a thing. im thinking just for tonight i'll use all my electric stuff i have at home for as much as i can without bothering the neibhours and leaving heating all the way up. and see how much i'll use up and then somehow calculate what the maximum ammount i couldve used in this period
    • D_M_E
    • By D_M_E 10th Nov 18, 4:15 PM
    • 1,988 Posts
    • 67,794 Thanks
    D_M_E
    It's also possible that you are reading the wrong meter - this is common in blocks of flats.

    You need to make sure the meter which you think is yours actually is the one supplying your flat and, when you have confirmed which one this is, check the serial number of the meter matches the one on the bill.

    To find out the correct one, turn everything off, including fridge/freezer.

    Go and look at the meter - if it's got a spinning disc the disc should not be moving.
    If a digital meter there should be a steady red light on it probably one of the top corners.

    Now, fill up a kettle plug it in and turn it on.

    Go back and look at meter - spinning disc should now be spinning or if digital red light should be flashing.
    If so, then you have correct meter.
    • DainiusK
    • By DainiusK 10th Nov 18, 4:31 PM
    • 6 Posts
    • 1 Thanks
    DainiusK
    It's also possible that you are reading the wrong meter - this is common in blocks of flats.

    You need to make sure the meter which you think is yours actually is the one supplying your flat and, when you have confirmed which one this is, check the serial number of the meter matches the one on the bill.

    To find out the correct one, turn everything off, including fridge/freezer.

    Go and look at the meter - if it's got a spinning disc the disc should not be moving.
    If a digital meter there should be a steady red light on it probably one of the top corners.

    Now, fill up a kettle plug it in and turn it on.

    Go back and look at meter - spinning disc should now be spinning or if digital red light should be flashing.
    If so, then you have correct meter.
    Originally posted by D_M_E
    I'll try to do it in a bit, but checked all the serial numbers and meter numbers and everything checks out so far
    • matelodave
    • By matelodave 10th Nov 18, 4:52 PM
    • 3,910 Posts
    • 2,467 Thanks
    matelodave
    The meter serial numbers and meter number might match with your bills but you need to ensure that the meter is actually serving your flat.

    There are numerous instances where people are paying for the energy in the wrong flat and someone else is paying for yours.

    It can call for a lot of diplomatic negotiation if that's the case trying to sort it all out.
    Love makes the world go round - beer make it go round even faster
    Look after our planet - it's the only one with beer
    • Houbara
    • By Houbara 10th Nov 18, 11:52 PM
    • 3,997 Posts
    • 2,598 Thanks
    Houbara
    Robin9 is correct, all electric properties are usually always Eco 7. These meters , if they are digital could have 3 readings..Day, Night, and a total of the day/.night..
    Only day and night readings are needed when submitting readings and it is very important not to mix these readings
    Can`t trust landlords readings neither.The property could have been vacant for weeks when he/she should have been paying the standing charges and any electric units and they are looking to transfer their costs onto the latest new occupant .
    Last edited by Houbara; 11-11-2018 at 9:30 AM. Reason: spelling mistake
    • Graham1
    • By Graham1 11th Nov 18, 8:59 AM
    • 437 Posts
    • 166 Thanks
    Graham1
    Are you sure it is economy 7 (night storage heaters) ? Some all electric properties now are air source heat pumps using single rate electric. These can be very expensive to run if the heat pump's size is not well matched to the property size. It then supplements the heat just like normal electric heaters burning the electric directly to make extra heat.
    • Hengus
    • By Hengus 11th Nov 18, 10:04 AM
    • 6,610 Posts
    • 4,242 Thanks
    Hengus
    I suggest that the OP applies Occam’s Razor. The most likely ‘cause’ of this problem is the starting reading. The OP needs to look at his bills and check that the reading relates to the day that he took legal responsibility for the property. If it does, then I fear that this will have to be put down to experience. If it doesn’t, then the answer is to provide the supplier with some form of document showing the date of the legal occupant and ask them to re-bill
  • E.ON Company Representative: Malc
    E.ON Billing
    So i've recenly ( 23sept) moved to new 2 bedroom flat with double glazing windows and all, electric heating. And just now received estimated bill from 23sept to 5nov so that add ups to 43 days. which says that they estimated that i've used 1613kwh per 43 day period. Which it thought might be estimate error, so i just checked the meter and at the moment of writing this it's 34333, the reading which was handed to me by landlord when i started my tenancy was 31729 so that adds up to 2604 kw/h used per 43 days about 450 pounds. im rarely home, heating is turned on only two times per day for 3.5 hours. There's even been a week when i had no heating at all due to boiler issues. The stuff i have is not much aswel:
    1 TV, 1 Computer, 1 Fridge freezer, 1 Washing machine and few phones. All lightning is LED power savers. I have all electric heating tho with 5 radiators in the flat.


    Im really distraught have no idea what's going on and how to proceed, is it possible i used that much energy per such short period ? Any tips or help would be greatly appreciated!
    Originally posted by DainiusK
    Im very bad at this kind of stuff, should've checked it myself when moved in, but trusted my landlord and that might've been very big mistake andstupid of me. Im really not sure what kind of tariff i would have is there a way i could check i do now that i have an E.ON energy plan and pay Normal tariff 16,95 per kwh
    Originally posted by DainiusK
    I'll try to do it in a bit, but checked all the serial numbers and meter numbers and everything checks out so far
    Originally posted by DainiusK

    Hello DainiusK and welcome to the Forums. Already some great advice on here - thanks all.

    As Hengus says, the starting meter reading is crucial. We'll have opened your account to the reading from your landlord and billed up to the one you gave us. If you're sure the meter you're reading is yours, the up to date reading will be right. The only way to amend the bill will be by changing the opening reading. This will lead to the landlord's account being re-billed. As this will affect a third party, we'll need evidence or the agreement of the landlord that their original reading wasn't right.

    If there's any doubt about the date responsibility passed to you, sight of the Tenancy Agreement will sort this.

    Your tariff - Energy Plan - is our standard product that customers automatically default to if they don't choose an alternative. We've other tariffs available through our website and the Price Comparison websites (PCW). I'd pop your details on to a PCW to see the options available both with us and with the other suppliers. There aren't any exit fees or tie-ins with Energy Plan leaving you free to switch tariff or supplier at any time without penalty.

    Hope this is useful DainiusK and that you've settled in to your new home. Let me know if you need any more information as happy to help.

    Malc
    Official Company Representative
    I am an official company representative of E.ON. MSE has given permission for me to post in response to queries about the company, so that I can help solve issues. You can see my name on the companies with permission to post list. I am not allowed to tout for business at all. If you believe I am please report it to forumteam@moneysavingexpert.com This does NOT imply any form of approval of my company or its products by MSE"
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