Your browser isn't supported
It looks like you're using an old web browser. To get the most out of the site and to ensure guides display correctly, we suggest upgrading your browser now. Download the latest:

Welcome to the MSE Forums

We're home to a fantastic community of MoneySavers but anyone can post. Please exercise caution & report spam, illegal, offensive or libellous posts/messages: click "report" or email forumteam@. Skimlinks & other affiliated links are turned on

Search
  • FIRST POST
    • wolfmansgotnards
    • By wolfmansgotnards 2nd Nov 18, 1:38 PM
    • 22Posts
    • 3Thanks
    wolfmansgotnards
    Loft Office Suitability Query?
    • #1
    • 2nd Nov 18, 1:38 PM
    Loft Office Suitability Query? 2nd Nov 18 at 1:38 PM
    Hi guys. I bought a house that has a huge loft. I want to use the loft as a temporary office space if possible. The loft is already floored and insulated, but the walls of the loft and the ceiling (roof) of the loft is not lined or insulated. There is a nice large velux window in the loft, if this helps answer my question.

    I am basically wanting to use the loft space for my office equipment and in it's current condition, I am aware that it is not possible. Is there any cheap/quick way of being able to use this space as an office? It will have lighting equipment, electricals etc.

    Is it possible to just temporarily cover the beams with things like ThermAll Bubble Insulation? Or cheap insulation boards? And is there anything I would need to do in order for my equipment to remain safe while stored up there?
Page 4
    • Doozergirl
    • By Doozergirl 8th Nov 18, 1:33 PM
    • 26,034 Posts
    • 70,321 Thanks
    Doozergirl
    Bored now.
    Everything that is supposed to be in heaven is already here on earth.
    • sevenhills
    • By sevenhills 8th Nov 18, 1:36 PM
    • 1,737 Posts
    • 629 Thanks
    sevenhills
    No, the answer is in what you say. You spread the load over more members, but this in itself doesn't strengthen anything.

    It is the equivalent of carrying one shopping bag in each hand rather than carrying two bags in one hand. Your arms don't become stronger because each one is only holding one bag, however as a system the load is easier to carry because the load is spread and balanced.
    Originally posted by EachPenny

    I do prefer to use both hands with two bags, I could carry four bags with two hands, but I could not carry four bags in one hand. If I had a rucksack, I could carry more than four bags

    • sevenhills
    • By sevenhills 8th Nov 18, 1:37 PM
    • 1,737 Posts
    • 629 Thanks
    sevenhills
    Bored now.
    Originally posted by Doozergirl

    And I thought you were a busy professional

    • dunroving
    • By dunroving 8th Nov 18, 1:54 PM
    • 1,371 Posts
    • 967 Thanks
    dunroving
    OK, one last try ...

    I assumed that in it's current state, the warm air would rise while the cold up in the attic would cause dampness and/or condensation. There are only boards on the floor in the loft at the moment. Would it be beneficial to board the walls and roof of the loft? Even without insulation?
    Originally posted by wolfmansgotnards
    So, you already have structural alterations to the loft (floor boarding) and you are considering further structural alterations (boarding the walls and roof). As you already have a window, that's getting pretty close to what most people would call a loft conversion.

    I think you're reading me the wrong way. Clearly text is not a great way of communicating or showing emotion sadly. So if my comments seemed like I didn't accept any professional advice, I apologise.

    I 100% accept help over my own advice as I know nothing about this sort of thing.

    What you said about the static load over several more beams makes sense as to how it could withstand the weight over such a long period of time.

    So my next guess is, if I want an inhabitable (not habitable?) room to do some work, I need a structural engineer out to strengthen the beams first?
    Originally posted by wolfmansgotnards
    I'd suggest the figure is below 100%. And yes, I think it's been suggested you might need the advice of a structural engineer, several times. So maybe 100% accept that advice, and come back and let us know what the structural engineer said.

    "underestimating the strength of lofts in Scotland". Now, THAT is what you call tongue in cheek. Clearly I wasn't basing the strength of my home on the place it was built.... And assuming all houses in the UK are built to a certain standard, I had no idea that the place of build would determine a different outcome. Nobody asked where my house was, therefore I had no idea it was relevant. Judging by your response, it sounds like it IS relevant?

    And no, changing the use of the loft doesn't mean it's a conversion. You added the word "Structure", not me. I am not changing the structure at all. If you refer back to the OP, you will see this "in it's current condition" - Meaning, no structural changes. - Hope this helps?
    Originally posted by wolfmansgotnards
    I'd suggest that is exactly what you said. Maybe use emoticons if you want to convey you weren't being 100% serious?

    You already have structural changes, and as per above, you are considering further structural changes. Adding load (boards) to the structure is a structural change (a change in the load).

    I hope you aren't in Stirlingshire and you don't have nosy neighbours who might call the Council to come and inspect the alterations to your loft. Even though you didn't make those previous changes, the Council could enforce you to apply for a retrospective building warrant.

    Many of the questions you are asking have been asked and answered in previous posts - just search for loft, or loft conversion.

    Over and out. Good luck.
    (Nearly) dunroving
    • EachPenny
    • By EachPenny 8th Nov 18, 4:19 PM
    • 7,999 Posts
    • 21,522 Thanks
    EachPenny
    I do prefer to use both hands with two bags, I could carry four bags with two hands, but I could not carry four bags in one hand. If I had a rucksack, I could carry more than four bags
    Originally posted by sevenhills
    Congratulations. You've just passed the first semester exam for your structural engineering degree.

    Next semester you will learn how to pile the four bags one on top of each other without them falling over. You'll be upgraded to the Master's course if you can manage to add a fifth bag.
    "In the future, everyone will be rich for 15 minutes"
    • wolfmansgotnards
    • By wolfmansgotnards 9th Nov 18, 10:03 AM
    • 22 Posts
    • 3 Thanks
    wolfmansgotnards
    OK, one last try ...



    So, you already have structural alterations to the loft (floor boarding) and you are considering further structural alterations (boarding the walls and roof). As you already have a window, that's getting pretty close to what most people would call a loft conversion.



    I'd suggest the figure is below 100%. And yes, I think it's been suggested you might need the advice of a structural engineer, several times. So maybe 100% accept that advice, and come back and let us know what the structural engineer said.



    I'd suggest that is exactly what you said. Maybe use emoticons if you want to convey you weren't being 100% serious?

    You already have structural changes, and as per above, you are considering further structural changes. Adding load (boards) to the structure is a structural change (a change in the load).

    I hope you aren't in Stirlingshire and you don't have nosy neighbours who might call the Council to come and inspect the alterations to your loft. Even though you didn't make those previous changes, the Council could enforce you to apply for a retrospective building warrant.

    Many of the questions you are asking have been asked and answered in previous posts - just search for loft, or loft conversion.

    Over and out. Good luck.
    Originally posted by dunroving
    Adding boards would be considered structural addition. And no, the council couldn't come and enforce me to apply for a building warrant. That's something out of this whole thread I DO KNOW.

    My question was, and STILL IS "is there a way to cheaply keep my loft (in it's current state) free from condensation as I want to use electricals in my loft for an hour or so as well as keep electricals in the loft with my storage".

    I appreciate all the sarcastic advice and off topic issues, but those weren't my questions.
    • Doozergirl
    • By Doozergirl 9th Nov 18, 11:31 AM
    • 26,034 Posts
    • 70,321 Thanks
    Doozergirl
    And the answer STILL IS that you shouldn't be sitting in your loft because it isnmt designed as a room.

    And you had plenty advice about insulation. You should insulate it like you would insulate - wait for it - a loft conversion. Because guess what? You are converting your loft.

    If it looks like a duck, swims like a duck and quacks like a duck...
    Everything that is supposed to be in heaven is already here on earth.
    • sevenhills
    • By sevenhills 9th Nov 18, 1:39 PM
    • 1,737 Posts
    • 629 Thanks
    sevenhills
    My question was, and STILL IS "is there a way to cheaply keep my loft (in it's current state) free from condensation as I want to use electricals in my loft for an hour or so as well as keep electricals in the loft with my storage".
    Originally posted by wolfmansgotnards

    I dont get why you keep saying that you have/may get 'condensation' in your loft.
    Do you mean dampness, which I dont get. My loft is dry but cold.

    • Fire Fox
    • By Fire Fox 9th Nov 18, 2:14 PM
    • 23,982 Posts
    • 27,137 Thanks
    Fire Fox
    My question was, and STILL IS "is there a way to cheaply keep my loft (in it's current state) free from condensation as I want to use electricals in my loft for an hour or so as well as keep electricals in the loft with my storage".

    I appreciate all the sarcastic advice and off topic issues, but those weren't my questions.
    Originally posted by wolfmansgotnards
    The answer was, and still is, NO there is no way to do that. See posts 19 and 21 on electrical safety and fire safety, for example.

    This sub-forum is not, and has never been, about 'helping' people DIY in a way that is clearly dangerous and/ or clearly illegal. MSE generally is not about 'helping' people engage in dangerous or illegal activities. That is made clear all over this website.
    Last edited by Fire Fox; 09-11-2018 at 2:16 PM.
    What a difference a day makes, twenty four little hours.
    • andre_xs
    • By andre_xs 9th Nov 18, 3:04 PM
    • 115 Posts
    • 24 Thanks
    andre_xs
    My question was, and STILL IS "is there a way to cheaply keep my loft (in it's current state) free from condensation as I want to use electricals in my loft for an hour or so as well as keep electricals in the loft with my storage".
    Originally posted by wolfmansgotnards
    Maybe we can take a little heat out of the discussion by separating the two issues of using the loft for activities other than bringing stuff up/down for/from storage and actually just storing something up there.

    For "storing" stuff: It really depends on the state of your loft and roof. If it is in a good state and well ventilated, then it may just get cold, but not necessarily damp. Then I wouldn't see any problem storing stuff up there. In my life, I used to store a lot of electrical stuff on attics without a problem.

    One issue might be smell: In particular in winter it might get slightly damp (not so much that's a problem for electrical items) which may cause this typical "attic/loft" smell. Thus, storing fabrics, clothes, etc. may be a problem because they may take up the smell. For this, we bought rather cheap plastic boxes with lids, put the stuff in there with a big pack of silicate or alike and then "seal" the box using masking tape around the lid. Worked very well so far, and if your electrical equipment is precious, you may do the same thing.

    Condensation is a different issue and may happen if warm air from your house (living space) can go up into the attic on a constant basis (e.g. the loft hatch isn't sealed properly). Then the humidity in the warm and humid air from your living space will condensate in the cold attic (e.g. at the membrane, the window, etc.). Since you said you haven't seen this so far, there shouldn't be a problem in this respect.

    Insulating the roof: If the floor is already insulated, I'm not sure that insulating the roof will change much in the loft space with respect to temperature and dampness. After all it is not heated and will adjust largely to the outside temperature. If you do it properly (damp proof membrane, etc.) you may get lower levels of dampness. But you'd have to do this very properly, because even tiny mistakes here may have huge effects in terms of condensation, dampness, mould, etc. But about all of this I'm not really sure as I'm not an expert on this.

    I'm keeping myself out of the discussion whether you should use the space for your YouTube videos. I presume that you already thought about using a bedroom or living room for this...

    Best wishes,
    Andre
    • EachPenny
    • By EachPenny 9th Nov 18, 3:05 PM
    • 7,999 Posts
    • 21,522 Thanks
    EachPenny
    I dont get why you keep saying that you have/may get 'condensation' in your loft.
    Do you mean dampness, which I dont get. My loft is dry but cold.
    Originally posted by sevenhills
    Back in the day of halogen light bulbs and magnetic tape, keeping them and using them in a cold place like a loft was a big no-no because any moisture (e.g. contained in your breath) would instantly condense on them and either cause them to pop (in the case of bulbs) or mangle the tape. VCRs used to come with strict instructions to leave them in a warm room to acclimatise before use for this very reason.

    With LEDs and digital devices the problem is less serious, but even so I would not use 's of equipment in an environment where condensation were a risk*.

    The solution is to have a professionally designed loft conversion with adequate structural support and appropriate heating and ventilation.

    *ETA: Also some devices have a condensation sensor and will simply refuse to switch on if they detect conditions where condensation is a risk.
    Last edited by EachPenny; 09-11-2018 at 3:09 PM. Reason: ETA
    "In the future, everyone will be rich for 15 minutes"
    • wolfmansgotnards
    • By wolfmansgotnards 10th Nov 18, 11:23 AM
    • 22 Posts
    • 3 Thanks
    wolfmansgotnards
    Maybe we can take a little heat out of the discussion by separating the two issues of using the loft for activities other than bringing stuff up/down for/from storage and actually just storing something up there.

    For "storing" stuff: It really depends on the state of your loft and roof. If it is in a good state and well ventilated, then it may just get cold, but not necessarily damp. Then I wouldn't see any problem storing stuff up there. In my life, I used to store a lot of electrical stuff on attics without a problem.

    One issue might be smell: In particular in winter it might get slightly damp (not so much that's a problem for electrical items) which may cause this typical "attic/loft" smell. Thus, storing fabrics, clothes, etc. may be a problem because they may take up the smell. For this, we bought rather cheap plastic boxes with lids, put the stuff in there with a big pack of silicate or alike and then "seal" the box using masking tape around the lid. Worked very well so far, and if your electrical equipment is precious, you may do the same thing.

    Condensation is a different issue and may happen if warm air from your house (living space) can go up into the attic on a constant basis (e.g. the loft hatch isn't sealed properly). Then the humidity in the warm and humid air from your living space will condensate in the cold attic (e.g. at the membrane, the window, etc.). Since you said you haven't seen this so far, there shouldn't be a problem in this respect.

    Insulating the roof: If the floor is already insulated, I'm not sure that insulating the roof will change much in the loft space with respect to temperature and dampness. After all it is not heated and will adjust largely to the outside temperature. If you do it properly (damp proof membrane, etc.) you may get lower levels of dampness. But you'd have to do this very properly, because even tiny mistakes here may have huge effects in terms of condensation, dampness, mould, etc. But about all of this I'm not really sure as I'm not an expert on this.

    I'm keeping myself out of the discussion whether you should use the space for your YouTube videos. I presume that you already thought about using a bedroom or living room for this...

    Best wishes,
    Andre
    Originally posted by andre_xs
    Thank you for your advice. This seems to be the most appropriate response without the need of any arguments.

    For the time being, I have been opening my loft hatch frequently to let hot and cold air flow through. Occasionally opening and closing the velux window too and everything seems ok so far. I used ThermAll for extra measure as originally advised to do by an experienced joiner (who also came up my loft to have a look) and all seems better now.

    My absolute main concern was electrics and important papers etc.
    • EachPenny
    • By EachPenny 10th Nov 18, 11:44 AM
    • 7,999 Posts
    • 21,522 Thanks
    EachPenny
    Thank you for your advice. This seems to be the most appropriate response without the need of any arguments.

    For the time being, I have been opening my loft hatch frequently to let hot and cold air flow through. Occasionally opening and closing the velux window too and everything seems ok so far. I used ThermAll for extra measure as originally advised to do by an experienced joiner (who also came up my loft to have a look) and all seems better now.

    My absolute main concern was electrics and important papers etc.
    Originally posted by wolfmansgotnards
    In which case you have just presented a classic example of "hearing the thing I wanted to hear" since you appear to have overlooked the most important sentence of Andre's post which was:-
    "But about all of this I'm not really sure as I'm not an expert on this"


    "In the future, everyone will be rich for 15 minutes"
    • Fire Fox
    • By Fire Fox 10th Nov 18, 8:57 PM
    • 23,982 Posts
    • 27,137 Thanks
    Fire Fox
    I used ThermAll for extra measure as originally advised to do by an experienced joiner (who also came up my loft to have a look) and all seems better now.

    My absolute main concern was electrics and important papers etc.
    Originally posted by wolfmansgotnards
    A joiner so experienced and paperwork so important you forgot about them for seventy posts.
    What a difference a day makes, twenty four little hours.
    • wolfmansgotnards
    • By wolfmansgotnards 13th Nov 18, 2:26 PM
    • 22 Posts
    • 3 Thanks
    wolfmansgotnards
    Thank you for your advice. This seems to be the most appropriate response without the need of any arguments.

    For the time being, I have been opening my loft hatch frequently to let hot and cold air flow through. Occasionally opening and closing the velux window too and everything seems ok so far. I used ThermAll for extra measure as originally advised to do by an experienced joiner (who also came up my loft to have a look) and all seems better now.

    My absolute main concern was electrics and important papers etc.
    Originally posted by wolfmansgotnards
    In which case you have just presented a classic example of "hearing the thing I wanted to hear" since you appear to have overlooked the most important sentence of Andre's post which was:-
    "But about all of this I'm not really sure as I'm not an expert on this"


    Originally posted by EachPenny
    Looks like you are just "reading what you want to read". As you can clearly see I wrote "without the need of any arguments". In terms of appropriate.

    There really is no point in trying to create an arguments.
    • EachPenny
    • By EachPenny 13th Nov 18, 2:55 PM
    • 7,999 Posts
    • 21,522 Thanks
    EachPenny
    Looks like you are just "reading what you want to read". As you can clearly see I wrote "without the need of any arguments". In terms of appropriate.

    There really is no point in trying to create an arguments.
    Originally posted by wolfmansgotnards
    There really is no point in asking a question on an internet forum if you regard anything which doesn't fit your opinion as an 'argument' and welcome comments from people who support your opinion, even where they clearly state that they are not an 'expert'.

    In fact other than having one person give you an answer you agree with, the whole of the rest of the thread has turned out to be a pretty pointless exercise for all concerned.
    "In the future, everyone will be rich for 15 minutes"
    • dunroving
    • By dunroving 13th Nov 18, 3:42 PM
    • 1,371 Posts
    • 967 Thanks
    dunroving
    <<snip>>
    In fact other than having one person give you an answer you agree with, the whole of the rest of the thread has turned out to be a pretty pointless exercise for all concerned.
    Originally posted by EachPenny
    I don't know - it does have a certain entertainment value, in a Vicky Pollard sketch sort of way.
    (Nearly) dunroving
    • wolfmansgotnards
    • By wolfmansgotnards 13th Nov 18, 6:29 PM
    • 22 Posts
    • 3 Thanks
    wolfmansgotnards
    There really is no point in asking a question on an internet forum if you regard anything which doesn't fit your opinion as an 'argument' and welcome comments from people who support your opinion, even where they clearly state that they are not an 'expert'.

    In fact other than having one person give you an answer you agree with, the whole of the rest of the thread has turned out to be a pretty pointless exercise for all concerned.
    Originally posted by EachPenny
    Well, clearly you have chosen to read select sentences to fit in with whatever you choose to think this is about. The ONE PERSON didn't give me an answer I agree with. You will see me agreeing with numerous people throughout the thread. And this ONE PERSON, I was happy with their choice of the way they were speaking. No bull$hit and no talking down to folk. Something you clearly don't know much about.

    We obviously don't know each other and that's fine. But I would never speak to anyone this way with the nitpickery snidey comments. It's very childish.

    I don't know - it does have a certain entertainment value, in a Vicky Pollard sketch sort of way.
    Originally posted by dunroving
    See above for the same response to the childish comments.
    • Doozergirl
    • By Doozergirl 13th Nov 18, 9:07 PM
    • 26,034 Posts
    • 70,321 Thanks
    Doozergirl
    I think I'd like the last word too.
    Everything that is supposed to be in heaven is already here on earth.
    • dunroving
    • By dunroving 13th Nov 18, 11:08 PM
    • 1,371 Posts
    • 967 Thanks
    dunroving
    I think someone is taking themselves and their opinions way too seriously. Lighten up for goodness' sake.
    (Nearly) dunroving
Welcome to our new Forum!

Our aim is to save you money quickly and easily. We hope you like it!

Forum Team Contact us

Live Stats

2,841Posts Today

6,405Users online

Martin's Twitter