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    • JustAnotherSaver
    • By JustAnotherSaver 31st Oct 18, 2:30 PM
    • 3,355Posts
    • 538Thanks
    JustAnotherSaver
    For anyone with a large DVD collection
    • #1
    • 31st Oct 18, 2:30 PM
    For anyone with a large DVD collection 31st Oct 18 at 2:30 PM
    Not sure of the best forum really. Just something i'd wondered -



    We're having a bit of a storage problem at the moment, not just with DVDs but things in general. Between my wife & I i wouldn't be surprised if we're getting on 200 DVDs and that's after selling the ones we really wont watch again.


    Just wondering how you guys store yours.


    Obviously i'm not talking to the people who've got 10-20 DVDs in their house, but those with quite an amount.





    What I've had to do is get one of those CD/DVD wallet things that stores about 8 DVDs to a sleeve and take all the discs out of their boxes.



    Only thing is some DVDs came in a sort of 'collectors casing' if you will. Metal tins, inserts etc. So while most packaging i don't really care about, some i'd rather not bin. Then when we feel like watching a movie but not necessarily a long one you have to Wikipedia the runtime of a movie if you don't have a box to refer to


    So what do you do?

Page 2
    • A Pandiculation
    • By A Pandiculation 1st Nov 18, 7:52 PM
    • 26 Posts
    • 30 Thanks
    A Pandiculation
    If your router doesn't have a USB port your much better getting a NAS drive and connecting it to an Ethernet port. I would recommend this as the first option anyway as most routers only have USB 2.0 ports which will severely limit the transfer speed which will be an issue when moving large files.
    Originally posted by takman
    I did say "most modern routers" just for that very reason. Mine for example has both USB3 and USB2 and isn't a particularly whizz-bang do-all model.
    Not only that but I did point out earlier that a NAS might suit their needs. It doesn't suit mine though and a router to USB3-connected 5TB portable drive is both much more energy-efficient, convenient and cost-effective than a NAS.
    Horses for courses as they say.
    • takman
    • By takman 1st Nov 18, 10:13 PM
    • 3,764 Posts
    • 3,424 Thanks
    takman
    I did say "most modern routers" just for that very reason. Mine for example has both USB3 and USB2 and isn't a particularly whizz-bang do-all model.
    Not only that but I did point out earlier that a NAS might suit their needs. It doesn't suit mine though and a router to USB3-connected 5TB portable drive is both much more energy-efficient, convenient and cost-effective than a NAS.
    Horses for courses as they say.
    Originally posted by A Pandiculation
    As far as i'm aware all the routers offered by ISP's only have USB 2.0 ports on them and none have USB 3.0 ports. So considering that most people keep the standard ISP router they won't have USB 3.0 unless they have bought one themselves.
    • Colin_Maybe
    • By Colin_Maybe 2nd Nov 18, 8:32 AM
    • 3,060 Posts
    • 1,582 Thanks
    Colin_Maybe
    As far as i'm aware all the routers offered by ISP's only have USB 2.0 ports on them and none have USB 3.0 ports. So considering that most people keep the standard ISP router they won't have USB 3.0 unless they have bought one themselves.
    Originally posted by takman
    The Sky Q router (and NowTV since it's the same one) not only doesn't have any USB port but only has 2 Ethernet ports, presumably because of the mass move to WiFi.
    • A Pandiculation
    • By A Pandiculation 2nd Nov 18, 9:18 AM
    • 26 Posts
    • 30 Thanks
    A Pandiculation
    As far as i'm aware all the routers offered by ISP's only have USB 2.0 ports on them and none have USB 3.0 ports. So considering that most people keep the standard ISP router they won't have USB 3.0 unless they have bought one themselves.
    Originally posted by takman
    Most people aren't wondering what to do with hundreds of DVD's and asking about options of which this was just one in this thread.

    Routers routinely offered by ISP's are most often budget offerings without any otherwise standard ports and usually with software restricted and options disabled to try & tie you to their broadband.
    That said some do offer usb3 ports, like BT's Homehub6.

    When you can buy a decent non-tied example for under a hundred quid and very probably use it with any provider if you want or need to change as well as benefitting from useful options like USB3 ports it's no wonder that there's such a market for modem/routers. Most people who have ever experienced problems with a tied router or is tech savvy will know this.
    According to an ispreview.co.uk survey in September over a third of respondents used non-tied access equipment. That suggests that more people buy their own routers/modems than you think.
    • takman
    • By takman 2nd Nov 18, 9:34 AM
    • 3,764 Posts
    • 3,424 Thanks
    takman
    Most people aren't wondering what to do with hundreds of DVD's and asking about options of which this was just one in this thread.

    Routers routinely offered by ISP's are most often budget offerings without any otherwise standard ports and usually with software restricted and options disabled to try & tie you to their broadband.
    That said some do offer usb3 ports, like BT's Homehub6.

    When you can buy a decent non-tied example for under a hundred quid and very probably use it with any provider if you want or need to change as well as benefitting from useful options like USB3 ports it's no wonder that there's such a market for modem/routers. Most people who have ever experienced problems with a tied router or is tech savvy will know this.
    According to an ispreview.co.uk survey in September over a third of respondents used non-tied access equipment. That suggests that more people buy their own routers/modems than you think.
    Originally posted by A Pandiculation
    But if the OP doesn't have a USB 3.0 port on their router they would be much better off spending the money buying a NAS with Ethernet then buying a new router plus a USB HDD.

    I'm quite surprised by that survey because i don't know many people personally who have changed their router from the one supplied to them by their ISP.
    • Carrot007
    • By Carrot007 2nd Nov 18, 9:42 AM
    • 1,701 Posts
    • 1,444 Thanks
    Carrot007
    1. Bung them all in boxes in the loft becuase I find it hard to get rid of things.


    2. Never touch them and use netflix?


    (Dr Who and blurays not included in this!)
    • JustAnotherSaver
    • By JustAnotherSaver 2nd Nov 18, 10:22 AM
    • 3,355 Posts
    • 538 Thanks
    JustAnotherSaver
    I'm quite surprised by that survey because i don't know many people personally who have changed their router from the one supplied to them by their ISP.
    Originally posted by takman
    I used to - before i signed up to fibre broadband. Now i just stick with the supplied router (so in this case the BT Smart Hub).

    • almillar
    • By almillar 2nd Nov 18, 1:08 PM
    • 7,604 Posts
    • 3,119 Thanks
    almillar
    as most routers only have USB 2.0 ports which will severely limit the transfer speed which will be an issue when moving large files.

    Maybe not such a problem now, but a lot of the earlier routers that could connect a hard drive didn't have the processing power to keep up with duties - not the same as a dedicated NAS at all.
    • A Pandiculation
    • By A Pandiculation 3rd Nov 18, 10:48 AM
    • 26 Posts
    • 30 Thanks
    A Pandiculation
    But if the OP doesn't have a USB 3.0 port on their router they would be much better off spending the money buying a NAS with Ethernet then buying a new router plus a USB HDD.

    I'm quite surprised by that survey because i don't know many people personally who have changed their router from the one supplied to them by their ISP.
    Originally posted by takman
    But I wasn't talking about the OP.
    I was explaining what I had done.
    Read my original post and you will see that I said a NAS might suit the OP and then explained the route I personally had taken.


    Interestingly though I see that the OP has a BT Smart Hub.
    Depending upon model it might have a USB3 port, because as I said above the Home Hub 6 does or there may be an upgrade option available. Either would provide a far more cost-effective (and easier if you're not too tech savvy) route than buying a NAS if that is the route the OP wants to go.
    • Pikeyp
    • By Pikeyp 7th Nov 18, 9:32 AM
    • 460 Posts
    • 190 Thanks
    Pikeyp
    re. physical storage ... have you got a spare room you could use?

    My sisters got so much 'stuff' she uses a spare bedroom (they are in a bungalow with two bedrooms 'upstairs'! ..) ... two racks full of DVD's as I recall ... and two wardrobes full of clothes too!
    • timodell
    • By timodell 9th Nov 18, 10:58 AM
    • 19 Posts
    • 6 Thanks
    timodell
    Go for wallet solution + Coollector Movie Database
    I had exactly the same dilemma a year ago and rationalised over 500 DVDs into 9 wallets - just kept a handful of specialised box sets (like Band of Brothers tin etc..) and my Blue rays. I also uploaded the database to Coollector which is a neat interactive database manager. It lets you catalogue your "owned" collection and shows them within a full database of information about the movies as well as interfacing with the Netflix movie database and Amazon DVD prices. So now I can easily check which movies/tv series I physically own and also get a handy update of the latest Netflix database - it even lets me use filters such as "new to streaming in last 30 days" and even sort by Imdb rating. Brilliant
    • Nebulous2
    • By Nebulous2 9th Nov 18, 7:28 PM
    • 2,094 Posts
    • 1,287 Thanks
    Nebulous2
    I spent several years where I bought a dvd a week, then moved on to blurays. They were all in a couple of large bookcases. I rarely if ever watched them. About 18 months ago we did up our lounge and they moved to boxes in the loft, where they've languished ever since. About 250 dvds and 150 blurays.
    • Bigphil1474
    • By Bigphil1474 12th Nov 18, 9:51 AM
    • 890 Posts
    • 384 Thanks
    Bigphil1474
    OP, we had about 400 dvd's - we gave the dross to charity shop, then piled the rest into a box. We decided that any we hadn't watch within 2 years weren't worth keeping. We've got about 150 dvd's left. My collection of blu rays is growing, mainly because I wanted the HD quality for the home projector. It's worth looking on Netflix or whatever streaming service you have/want to see whether some of the films you have are available on there, but so long as you have a working player, I don't see the problem in keeping the ones you will watch at some point.
    I almost got rid of the Disney/Kids type movies that we got for the grandkids about 10 or more years ago, but then came along grandchild number 3, so they are back in use. Bed knobs and broomsticks - a classic.
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