Your browser isn't supported
It looks like you're using an old web browser. To get the most out of the site and to ensure guides display correctly, we suggest upgrading your browser now. Download the latest:

Welcome to the MSE Forums

We're home to a fantastic community of MoneySavers but anyone can post. Please exercise caution & report spam, illegal, offensive or libellous posts/messages: click "report" or email forumteam@.

Search
  • FIRST POST
    • chesky
    • By chesky 13th Oct 18, 11:57 AM
    • 1,073Posts
    • 1,796Thanks
    chesky
    Child maintenance to 18 year old
    • #1
    • 13th Oct 18, 11:57 AM
    Child maintenance to 18 year old 13th Oct 18 at 11:57 AM
    Is it legally possible to pay child maintenance direct to an 18 year old going to university, rather than to their mother?
Page 1
    • Mojisola
    • By Mojisola 13th Oct 18, 12:01 PM
    • 30,146 Posts
    • 77,479 Thanks
    Mojisola
    • #2
    • 13th Oct 18, 12:01 PM
    • #2
    • 13th Oct 18, 12:01 PM
    Doesn't CM stop when Child Benefit is stopped?

    No-one could claim CB for a uni student.

    There's nothing to stop a parent giving financial support directly to their child.
    • mattpaint
    • By mattpaint 13th Oct 18, 12:15 PM
    • 240 Posts
    • 470 Thanks
    mattpaint
    • #3
    • 13th Oct 18, 12:15 PM
    • #3
    • 13th Oct 18, 12:15 PM
    It depends on what the court order/agreement says.
    • Mojisola
    • By Mojisola 13th Oct 18, 12:18 PM
    • 30,146 Posts
    • 77,479 Thanks
    Mojisola
    • #4
    • 13th Oct 18, 12:18 PM
    • #4
    • 13th Oct 18, 12:18 PM
    Is it legally possible to pay child maintenance direct to an 18 year old going to university, rather than to their mother?
    Originally posted by chesky
    It depends on what the court order/agreement says.
    Originally posted by mattpaint
    If there's a court order for CM then it would have to be paid to the resident parent, not the child.
    • chesky
    • By chesky 13th Oct 18, 1:08 PM
    • 1,073 Posts
    • 1,796 Thanks
    chesky
    • #5
    • 13th Oct 18, 1:08 PM
    • #5
    • 13th Oct 18, 1:08 PM
    There is no court order.
    • chesky
    • By chesky 13th Oct 18, 1:20 PM
    • 1,073 Posts
    • 1,796 Thanks
    chesky
    • #6
    • 13th Oct 18, 1:20 PM
    • #6
    • 13th Oct 18, 1:20 PM
    Sorry, perhaps I should give more information (it's not me, by the way). When they split up about twelve years ago, they had an unofficial agreement about how much he paid. After several months, she involved the CSA as it was then. After making their calculations they told him he was paying too much and he could reduce it. He didn't. 12 years on, they are both earning very similar salaries and their son will be going to university next year - A levels allowing. At present he pays her two-thirds of his maintenance and gives his son one-third as an allowance. As far as I know she has not objected to this arrangement. Their son spends most weekends with his father, plus one night in the week. As I said before, dad would prefer giving the money involved to his son whilst at uni.
    • Mojisola
    • By Mojisola 13th Oct 18, 1:46 PM
    • 30,146 Posts
    • 77,479 Thanks
    Mojisola
    • #7
    • 13th Oct 18, 1:46 PM
    • #7
    • 13th Oct 18, 1:46 PM
    Doesn't CM stop when Child Benefit is stopped?

    No-one could claim CB for a uni student.

    There's nothing to stop a parent giving financial support directly to their child.
    Originally posted by Mojisola
    When they split up about twelve years ago, they had an unofficial agreement about how much he paid.

    After several months, she involved the CSA as it was then.

    As I said before, dad would prefer giving the money involved to his son whilst at uni.
    Originally posted by chesky
    Then, as before, his legal obligation to pay the mother money will stop when CB stops.

    The father can pay whatever he wants to whoever he wants.
    • mattpaint
    • By mattpaint 13th Oct 18, 1:55 PM
    • 240 Posts
    • 470 Thanks
    mattpaint
    • #8
    • 13th Oct 18, 1:55 PM
    • #8
    • 13th Oct 18, 1:55 PM
    Sorry, perhaps I should give more information (it's not me, by the way). When they split up about twelve years ago, they had an unofficial agreement about how much he paid. After several months, she involved the CSA as it was then. After making their calculations they told him he was paying too much and he could reduce it. He didn't. 12 years on, they are both earning very similar salaries and their son will be going to university next year - A levels allowing. At present he pays her two-thirds of his maintenance and gives his son one-third as an allowance. As far as I know she has not objected to this arrangement. Their son spends most weekends with his father, plus one night in the week. As I said before, dad would prefer giving the money involved to his son whilst at uni.
    Originally posted by chesky
    Then yes he can. As soon as he is no longer legally required to give the money to the child's mother, he can give it to his son.
    • maman
    • By maman 13th Oct 18, 6:10 PM
    • 18,892 Posts
    • 112,741 Thanks
    maman
    • #9
    • 13th Oct 18, 6:10 PM
    • #9
    • 13th Oct 18, 6:10 PM
    Then yes he can. As soon as he is no longer legally required to give the money to the child's mother, he can give it to his son.
    Originally posted by mattpaint

    That's true.


    But just some food for thought for your 'friend' OP.


    There was a long thread on here recently about parental contributions to 'children' at university. Briefly, the OP found it hard to accept that any grant/loan that a child receives will be means tested on parental income and the parent(s) expected to make up the shortfall so that the child can live and eat on top of the tuition fees.


    So your friend might want to consider what sort of loan his child will get, how much accommodation will cost, what his mother will contribute etc. and then give him money accordingly. It would help if the parents could discuss it.
    • chesky
    • By chesky 14th Oct 18, 11:29 AM
    • 1,073 Posts
    • 1,796 Thanks
    chesky
    That's true.


    But just some food for thought for your 'friend' OP.


    So your friend might want to consider what sort of loan his child will get, how much accommodation will cost, what his mother will contribute etc. and then give him money accordingly. It would help if the parents could discuss it.
    Originally posted by maman
    I'm sure they will discuss it - they're not on bad terms. He just wanted to know the legal situation in good time, before deciding any possible action.

    And I don't think I said it was a friend - with or without quotation marks.
    • clearingout
    • By clearingout 14th Oct 18, 12:02 PM
    • 3,170 Posts
    • 6,403 Thanks
    clearingout
    Are you expecting your ex to maintain a home for him for long uni holidays? Will you expect him to get free board whilst he is at uni? If so, you may want to consider something to cover half the cost of having him at home - uni holidays are long and can place a high financial burden on parents who are on a low income.
    • chesky
    • By chesky 14th Oct 18, 12:20 PM
    • 1,073 Posts
    • 1,796 Thanks
    chesky
    Are you expecting your ex to maintain a home for him for long uni holidays? Will you expect him to get free board whilst he is at uni? If so, you may want to consider something to cover half the cost of having him at home - uni holidays are long and can place a high financial burden on parents who are on a low income.
    Originally posted by clearingout
    Excuse me, 'my ex'? I'm 74 years old and a widow.
    • Red-Squirrel
    • By Red-Squirrel 14th Oct 18, 12:41 PM
    • 3,842 Posts
    • 10,379 Thanks
    Red-Squirrel
    Excuse me, 'my ex'? I'm 74 years old and a widow.
    Originally posted by chesky
    No need to be arsey about it, its obvious what the point of the post is, and its a sensible question.
    • chesky
    • By chesky 14th Oct 18, 1:01 PM
    • 1,073 Posts
    • 1,796 Thanks
    chesky
    Not being arsey, just stating a fact. I said in my second post that it wasn't me. The poster obviously hadn't read it.

    Also, I stated the current situation. They both earn more or less the same amount. They share their son's care. He's their only child and they both care about his welfare. When he goes to university, who knows what will happen. He may decide he's having such a good time wherever he is that he doesn't want to come back. Alternatively, he could be back every weekend, taking his laundry to his mother and expecting to be fed by his father. Who knows? That's not what I was asking.
    • zagfles
    • By zagfles 14th Oct 18, 1:35 PM
    • 13,645 Posts
    • 11,630 Thanks
    zagfles
    The other issue to consider is which parent the student's finances will be based on - SFE will normally assess the income of the "household" the student lives - see here for full details: https://www.practitioners.slc.co.uk/media/1209/sfe_faqs_by_parents_fs_1718_d.pdf

    Household income includes any partner of the parent.
    • meer53
    • By meer53 14th Oct 18, 1:52 PM
    • 9,335 Posts
    • 13,623 Thanks
    meer53
    SFE use income as per declared to HMRC as taxable so the CM wouldnt be taken into account. It will stop anyway at 18 so the father can give what he wants to who he wants.
    • maman
    • By maman 14th Oct 18, 4:05 PM
    • 18,892 Posts
    • 112,741 Thanks
    maman
    I'm sure they will discuss it - they're not on bad terms. He just wanted to know the legal situation in good time, before deciding any possible action.

    And I don't think I said it was a friend - with or without quotation marks.
    Originally posted by chesky

    Sorry if I caused offence but as you were helping the person out by gathering information I made (an obviously wrong) assumption that he was a friend (or similar hence the quotation marks).


    It's up to you how much information you give but, in my defence, it's not surprising if people fill in gaps and make wrong assumptions.
    • chesky
    • By chesky 14th Oct 18, 5:22 PM
    • 1,073 Posts
    • 1,796 Thanks
    chesky
    Apology accepted; I hope you noticed that I did in fact thank you for the information. But I always get a trifle suspicious when people put the word friend in quotation marks - it's like when people put 'model' - has rather odd connotations and here it could have just as easily been neighbour, colleague, relative, etc.

    Anyway, again thanks for the info - and to all the others who were helpful.
    • SingleSue
    • By SingleSue 15th Oct 18, 12:22 AM
    • 10,395 Posts
    • 58,821 Thanks
    SingleSue
    One of the few decent things my ex husband has done post divorce is to continue his financial support of the children direct to them whilst they are at university...it's not a huge amount (the maintenance when paid to me wasn't either) but it helps them a lot. Even more surprising for everyone was that he did it on his own volition and with no pressure from any party to do so, he saw that I was helping and decided to match it with the money 'saved' from not having to pay maintenance anymore.
    We made it! One graduated, 2 currently at university, been hard work but it shows there is a possibility of a chance of normal (ish) life after a diagnosis (or two) of ASD. It's not been the easiest route but I am so glad I ignored everything and everyone and did my own therapies with them.
    Eldests' EDS diagnosis 4.5.10, mine 13.1.11 eekk!
    • zagfles
    • By zagfles 15th Oct 18, 7:24 PM
    • 13,645 Posts
    • 11,630 Thanks
    zagfles
    SFE use income as per declared to HMRC as taxable so the CM wouldnt be taken into account. It will stop anyway at 18 so the father can give what he wants to who he wants.
    Originally posted by meer53
    My point wasn't about CM being included as income, it was about which household's income is used, mother's or father's.
Welcome to our new Forum!

Our aim is to save you money quickly and easily. We hope you like it!

Forum Team Contact us

Live Stats

2,040Posts Today

7,204Users online

Martin's Twitter