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  • FIRST POST
    • susec3
    • By susec3 6th Oct 18, 3:26 PM
    • 2Posts
    • 0Thanks
    susec3
    Is it cheaper to heat the house or reduce the humidity?
    • #1
    • 6th Oct 18, 3:26 PM
    Is it cheaper to heat the house or reduce the humidity? 6th Oct 18 at 3:26 PM
    I can function quite well with my house never getting warmer than 18 degrees, but I start to get damp problems. I've bought a little dehumidifier but it doesnt seem to extract much - I believe they don't work well in cooler temperatures.
    Should I buy a more powerful dehumidifier or turn the heating up?
    I have GCH with a programmable thermostat, radiator valves and an eco boiler. It's a 1904 terrace with big rooms and high ceilings. There's a large crawl space under the floor which doesn't help, but full loft insulation. It's part double glazed but some of the double glazing is poor.
    I have a very low income, and only a little capital.
    How can I best keep the damp down whilst minimising my bills (including the cost if I need to buy a better dehumidifier). Thanks!
Page 1
    • wavelets
    • By wavelets 6th Oct 18, 4:40 PM
    • 454 Posts
    • 196 Thanks
    wavelets
    • #2
    • 6th Oct 18, 4:40 PM
    • #2
    • 6th Oct 18, 4:40 PM
    I can function quite well with my house never getting warmer than 18 degrees, but I start to get damp problems. I've bought a little dehumidifier but it doesnt seem to extract much - I believe they don't work well in cooler temperatures.
    Should I buy a more powerful dehumidifier or turn the heating up?
    I have GCH with a programmable thermostat, radiator valves and an eco boiler. It's a 1904 terrace with big rooms and high ceilings. There's a large crawl space under the floor which doesn't help, but full loft insulation. It's part double glazed but some of the double glazing is poor.
    I have a very low income, and only a little capital.
    How can I best keep the damp down whilst minimising my bills (including the cost if I need to buy a better dehumidifier). Thanks!
    Originally posted by susec3
    You need to reduce the humidity.

    Increasing the temperature will not reduce the humidity; all the higher temperature does is to allow the air to carry more water.

    The cheapest and easiset way to reduce the humidity (assuming outside humidity is not high) is to open a window to improve ventilation.
    In addition, you need to identify what is causing the humidity in the first place, and see what you can do to reduce that.

    Google "how to reduce humidity in the home"

    Here are some of the numerous results to get you started:

    https://www.idealhome.co.uk/news/humidity-house-190521

    https://www.envirovent.com/blog/top-tips-for-improving-the-indoor-air-quality-in-your-home/

    https://www.envirovent.com/blog/14-ways-to-help-reduce-condensation-in-your-property/
    • Peanut8472
    • By Peanut8472 7th Oct 18, 2:54 PM
    • 78 Posts
    • 16 Thanks
    Peanut8472
    • #3
    • 7th Oct 18, 2:54 PM
    • #3
    • 7th Oct 18, 2:54 PM
    Hi, having solid walls, we get a touch of condensation too. Things that create humidity:-

    Washing. Don't hang your clothes on the radiators to dry - dry em outside, get a condensing dryer (or one piped outside) or at least in a room with window open (and interior door closed).


    Cooking. Kettle boiling, or any other boiling, all creates humdity. Best thing to do, get a proper extractor fitted, which actually vents outside, not one of these recirculation things.

    Bathroom. Same as for kitchen, make sure you have an extractor fan, thats actually extracting outside, and that its removing the required volume of air. Oh, and keep bathroom door closed to prevent moisture floating round the house

    I've done all those things. And now only require a granule de-humidifier (75p in poundsomething in one of the wardrobes which is on an outside wall. (not got around to insulating it yet).

    Trickle vents on windows are good too.
    • badmemory
    • By badmemory 7th Oct 18, 7:36 PM
    • 2,134 Posts
    • 3,008 Thanks
    badmemory
    • #4
    • 7th Oct 18, 7:36 PM
    • #4
    • 7th Oct 18, 7:36 PM
    A dehumidifier works much better that an extractor fan. I have one I use in the bathroom & it has got rid of all the mould. I also have a proper extractor fan in the bathroom which makes a draft & has little effect on the moisture content of the air unless it is on day & night. I have humidity meters & thermometers scattered round the house to check progress. But all my mould has gone & I rarely have any condensation on my windows even when it is very cold out.


    What did surprise me was how much moisture is generated just having the gas burning in the kitchen with nothing cooking to give off moisture. Obviously a chemistry class I wasn't paying attention in!
    • Peanut8472
    • By Peanut8472 8th Oct 18, 9:02 AM
    • 78 Posts
    • 16 Thanks
    Peanut8472
    • #5
    • 8th Oct 18, 9:02 AM
    • #5
    • 8th Oct 18, 9:02 AM
    Sorry Badmemory, but you're wrong.

    All a dehumidifier does, is try to alleviate a problem which has already happened.

    A correctly specified extractor, will prevent the mould from forming in the first place, AND it will be considerably cheaper to both purchase, and run.


    Prevention is always better than cure.
    Last edited by Peanut8472; 08-10-2018 at 9:05 AM.
    • wavelets
    • By wavelets 8th Oct 18, 9:26 AM
    • 454 Posts
    • 196 Thanks
    wavelets
    • #6
    • 8th Oct 18, 9:26 AM
    • #6
    • 8th Oct 18, 9:26 AM
    Interesting to see that MrAPJI came to MSE yesterday (having not posted here for almost 2 months) to thank several posts, including that of badmemory within 15 minutes of that post ... the only post thanked here of the energy board



    Just saying...

    • Peanut8472
    • By Peanut8472 8th Oct 18, 9:58 AM
    • 78 Posts
    • 16 Thanks
    Peanut8472
    • #7
    • 8th Oct 18, 9:58 AM
    • #7
    • 8th Oct 18, 9:58 AM
    Interesting to see just how much research you do into other people's posts wavelets.


    I'm sure we all appreciate your feedback



    Just saying
    • susec3
    • By susec3 13th Oct 18, 12:18 PM
    • 2 Posts
    • 0 Thanks
    susec3
    • #8
    • 13th Oct 18, 12:18 PM
    Thanks, and I've rechecked my moisture controls
    • #8
    • 13th Oct 18, 12:18 PM
    Thanks for the info, always useful to address the basics, but other than some draught around the carpet in the lounge (now addressed) I have nothing left, as a tenant, I can deal with.
    Whatever I do, the moisture is a problem. Like the person with solid walls.
    Whilst I appreciate that increasing the heating doesn't solve the problem, what I really need to know is the most cost effective way to avoid the consequences of the problem. Mould, dampness and an uncomfortable environment.
    Anyone able to comment on my original question?
    • bxboards
    • By bxboards 13th Oct 18, 12:42 PM
    • 1,597 Posts
    • 1,256 Thanks
    bxboards
    • #9
    • 13th Oct 18, 12:42 PM
    • #9
    • 13th Oct 18, 12:42 PM
    About the best thing you can do which won't cost any money, is to open windows when you have a nice sunny crisp day.

    Dehumidifiers can be very useful, my own house is approx. 200 years old with solid stone wall construction. Like you I do not like anything too warm, 16 to 18C is my comfortable temperature. I'd say if you do have damp walls, then putting on the central heating will just evaporate it, unless you remove the moisture from the air somehow.

    Make sure you are not contributing to the damp with your lifestyle, if its a condensation issue, 9/10 times it's something you are doing that is contributing to it.
    • Whitterbod
    • By Whitterbod 13th Oct 18, 8:07 PM
    • 16 Posts
    • 3 Thanks
    Whitterbod
    Also have you checked round the house for blocked gutters as water running down wall adds to damp ,also the condition of brickwork and rendering,,, i use a dehumidifier in my spare room when my washing can not be hung on the washjng line
    Thats a good idea thanks muchly..
    • nic_c
    • By nic_c 14th Oct 18, 12:52 PM
    • 1,822 Posts
    • 958 Thanks
    nic_c
    How old is the house? It's just old houses were designed with draughts, because they often had coal fires that sucked lots of air through. Those have been replaced with gas fires, which have no where near the same air throughput or blocked up and central heating put in. Draughts from floorboards, which were fine with coal fires often get sealed or stopped with good floor covering. This means that sources of moisture don't have the same escape routes.

    As stated opening windows to get some fresh air in is good - people don't like doing that on cold days, but looking at stopping moisture in the first place is good - like not drying clothes on a radiator. Dehumidifiers are good for drying clothes - put them on a clothes horse and a dehumidifier next to it, they will soon be dry.
    • Gloomendoom
    • By Gloomendoom 14th Oct 18, 1:19 PM
    • 14,909 Posts
    • 20,293 Thanks
    Gloomendoom
    What did surprise me was how much moisture is generated just having the gas burning in the kitchen with nothing cooking to give off moisture. Obviously a chemistry class I wasn't paying attention in!
    Originally posted by badmemory
    Here you go...

    Never argue with stupid people, they will drag you down to their level and then beat you with experience. - Mark Twain
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