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    • Dawn1966
    • By Dawn1966 15th Sep 18, 10:12 PM
    • 24Posts
    • 10Thanks
    Dawn1966
    Japanese Knotweed - Next steps
    • #1
    • 15th Sep 18, 10:12 PM
    Japanese Knotweed - Next steps 15th Sep 18 at 10:12 PM
    I had a survey done and bought my house in June this year, I've yet to move in.

    My Homebuyers report stated:
    'We saw no sign of invasive species such as Japanese Knotweed in either the
    garden or on adjoining land. Japanese Knotweed is, however, known to exist in
    the area and may become a problem in the future. These plants are not always
    detectable because in the dormant season they may not be physically present or
    difficult to distinguish from other dormant vegetation. In the growing season they
    can grow rapidly and, therefore, may not be visible above ground on one day, but
    visible shortly afterwards the following day/week.'

    This week I climbed onto the wall at the back to look over my fence at the adjoining agricultural land, and there it was blowing in the breeze, in full flower right at the back of my shed!!

    It would have been fully growing when the survey was done, and if the surveyor didn't look over the fence (which would have meant using a step ladder or climbing the small wall) how could he state
    'We saw no sign of invasive species such as Japanese Knotweed in either the
    garden or on adjoining land'

    I wrote to the environment agency and they sent me this reply...
    It's down to landowners to control any Japanese knotweed on their land, but they don't have to remove it as the natural growth and spread is not illegal. However, allowing the Japanese knotweed to spread onto land outside of the ownership or control of the landowner can be seen as an offence.
    If your neighbour is knowingly allowing the plant to spread, this can be reported to the local Wildlife liaison officer at the local police station.
    Also causing Japanese knotweed to spread by removing or disposing of it incorrectly would be illegal.
    The Environmental Protection Act 1990 lists the plant as a 'controlled waste' and it must be disposed of properly.

    The Police and Local Authorities may take enforcement action if a landowner causes or allows Japanese Knotweed to spread to land outside their boundaries.'

    My neighbour said he had noticed that the owner of the land had tried to clear patches in the field by cutting it down, digging out the roots and burning it.

    I don't know who owns the land but no doubt will be able to find out.

    So my question is, what are the next steps I should take?
    Many thanks in advance.
Page 1
    • jonnygee2
    • By jonnygee2 15th Sep 18, 10:29 PM
    • 444 Posts
    • 443 Thanks
    jonnygee2
    • #2
    • 15th Sep 18, 10:29 PM
    • #2
    • 15th Sep 18, 10:29 PM
    So my question is, what are the next steps I should take?
    It's still far from your house. You can use RHS guidance to remove the knotweed with weedkiller, or call in contractors, if you see any in your garden.

    For the neighbouring land, well, it's not on your land so nothing you can do other than reporting any further botched attempt to remove it by the landowner. Not that I'd expect the police or council to do much more than send a letter.

    It is a pain, but well managed it shouldn't be a huge problem.

    'We saw no sign of invasive species such as Japanese Knotweed in either the
    garden or on adjoining land'
    They would have seen some of the adjoining land (e.g. neighbours gardens?). But they can't be expected to survey areas they don't have access to.
    • elsien
    • By elsien 15th Sep 18, 10:37 PM
    • 17,546 Posts
    • 44,364 Thanks
    elsien
    • #3
    • 15th Sep 18, 10:37 PM
    • #3
    • 15th Sep 18, 10:37 PM
    I've tried reporting to the council and the only time they get involved is either when it's on their own land, or it's spreading and being a nuisance.
    If it's just sitting there on private land and not really impacting on anyone else, they don't want to know.
    If you can find out who it belongs to quickly, this is a really good time for treating it because as it dies back for the winter it takes the chemicals down to the roots with it. You or them get a load of the strongest glyphosate you can find, inject it into the stems or spray it. That should knock it back , then repeat next year towards the end of the season.
    All shall be well, and all shall be well, and all manner of things shall be well.

    Pedant alert - it's could have, not could of.
    • Marvel1
    • By Marvel1 16th Sep 18, 12:13 AM
    • 3,625 Posts
    • 3,961 Thanks
    Marvel1
    • #4
    • 16th Sep 18, 12:13 AM
    • #4
    • 16th Sep 18, 12:13 AM
    I have some growing this year in my garden, hopefully use this tomorrow:
    https://www.amazon.co.uk/Roundup-Tree-Stump-Weedkiller-250ml/dp/B01BY4FFPK/ref=mp_s_a_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1537053081&sr=8-1&pi=AC_SX236_SY340_QL65&keywords=Roundup+Tree+Stu mp+Weedkiller+250ml&dpPl=1&dpID=51xjwAnQwZL&ref=pl Srch

    Also you will need a spray bottle, this is not a spray. I have to add 20ml of the stuff to 1 litre of water.
    Last edited by Marvel1; 16-09-2018 at 12:18 AM.
    • Davesnave
    • By Davesnave 16th Sep 18, 2:00 AM
    • 26,618 Posts
    • 95,962 Thanks
    Davesnave
    • #5
    • 16th Sep 18, 2:00 AM
    • #5
    • 16th Sep 18, 2:00 AM

    Also you will need a spray bottle, this is not a spray. I have to add 20ml of the stuff to 1 litre of water.
    Originally posted by cjdavies

    It's not on the OP's land, so treatment isn't an option for her at this point.


    I gave advice when the OP posted elsewhere, and that still stands.


    If treatment becomes an option, ordinary 360g/l glyphosate that is not pre-mixed is adequate.
    A garden is never so good as it will be next year....
    • moneyistooshorttomention
    • By moneyistooshorttomention 16th Sep 18, 7:14 AM
    • 17,085 Posts
    • 47,196 Thanks
    moneyistooshorttomention
    • #6
    • 16th Sep 18, 7:14 AM
    • #6
    • 16th Sep 18, 7:14 AM
    I'd be starting by finding out whose land it is personally. Two methods:

    - The official one - of asking the Land Registry
    - The unofficial one - of asking around in places like local pubs/corner shops/etc.

    You can't "ask" the land-owner to deal with it (properly) until you know who the land-owner is.
    Never doubt that a small group of people can change the world.

    It's the only thing that ever has.
    • daveyjp
    • By daveyjp 16th Sep 18, 8:52 AM
    • 7,714 Posts
    • 6,278 Thanks
    daveyjp
    • #7
    • 16th Sep 18, 8:52 AM
    • #7
    • 16th Sep 18, 8:52 AM
    As this years above ground growth is now dying off there's not a lot you can do until next April/May when you can see if it has spread to your land.

    Use the time to find the owner and advise them of their responsibilities. They may not be aware or know how to deal with it.
    • Dawn1966
    • By Dawn1966 16th Sep 18, 10:21 AM
    • 24 Posts
    • 10 Thanks
    Dawn1966
    • #8
    • 16th Sep 18, 10:21 AM
    • #8
    • 16th Sep 18, 10:21 AM
    Thank you everyone.
    I am going to try finding the owner and politely requesting them to help me deal with it so that it doesn't get onto my land in the first place (fingers crossed).
    It's still in full flower and I believe that it can still be treated as the flowers/leaves die off they will take the glysophate back to the rhizome so I might do that on the stuff I can get to at the back of my shed.
    (Thanks for the details CJDavies) You can also inject the rhizome which I understand is the preferred method.
    • Dawn1966
    • By Dawn1966 16th Sep 18, 10:23 AM
    • 24 Posts
    • 10 Thanks
    Dawn1966
    • #9
    • 16th Sep 18, 10:23 AM
    • #9
    • 16th Sep 18, 10:23 AM
    Oh and also I may have a chat with the Wildlife Liaison Officer (if there is such a person at my local police station) and to the local council just so that my complaint is registered somewhere, just in case I and my neighbours end up having to take legal action.
    • Davesnave
    • By Davesnave 16th Sep 18, 3:12 PM
    • 26,618 Posts
    • 95,962 Thanks
    Davesnave
    It's still in full flower and I believe that it can still be treated as the flowers/leaves die off they will take the glysophate back to the rhizome so I might do that on the stuff I can get to at the back of my shed.
    (Thanks for the details CJDavies) You can also inject the rhizome which I understand is the preferred method.
    Originally posted by Dawn1966
    Injection is probably best at this point in the year, but that involves going onto the land, which would be OK if you can find the owner and gain permission first.
    A garden is never so good as it will be next year....
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