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  • FIRST POST
    • Sewnuppockets
    • By Sewnuppockets 15th Sep 18, 9:00 PM
    • 2Posts
    • 13Thanks
    Sewnuppockets
    Offsetting
    • #1
    • 15th Sep 18, 9:00 PM
    Offsetting 15th Sep 18 at 9:00 PM
    Firstly let me say I am retired, so have the time to indulge in offsetting, but so do lots of other retirees who complain of being hard up.
    As a married couple we live well on less than the published comfortable retired couples income.

    There is very little we go without, and we have driven our annual living costs down each year for the past three years in almost every heading.

    We also enjoy treats and holidays by offsetting.

    That is every saving, even our recent switch of milk from Tesco to Home Bargains has netted us an extra £48.36 a year offset to spend on a little luxury or added to our holiday fund.

    Savvy shopping, in fact Savvy living has provided us with a regular long haul holiday, even in business class at offer price, for the last five years.

    An important tool is the guarantee drawer. Every item we buy we always, always complete online warranties, or cards, and file the paperwork. Online or registering can give a better warranty than those hard sells addled on to your goods by the retailer. Come the time something goes wrong, straight to the file and check if we are covered. Built in redundancy often means a well used kettle, iron or even washing machine will fail before the warranty expires. Happy Days here comes a new replacement.

    If you have the time, try offsetting, it is fun, and becomes a profitable habit.
Page 1
    • Olliebeak1951
    • By Olliebeak1951 15th Sep 18, 10:04 PM
    • 354 Posts
    • 3,168 Thanks
    Olliebeak1951
    • #2
    • 15th Sep 18, 10:04 PM
    • #2
    • 15th Sep 18, 10:04 PM
    Thanks for that tip, Sewnuppockets
    • angela110660
    • By angela110660 15th Sep 18, 10:18 PM
    • 778 Posts
    • 2,012 Thanks
    angela110660
    • #3
    • 15th Sep 18, 10:18 PM
    • #3
    • 15th Sep 18, 10:18 PM
    Ollie Beak? Weren't you a friend of Wally Whyton? Gosh that takes me back....
    Free films - 2009: saw 7 films. 2010 saw 7 films. 2011 saw 7 films. 2012 saw 5 films;2013 saw 7 films; 2014 and 2015 saw 1 in each. Nothing since!
    • Sayschezza
    • By Sayschezza 15th Sep 18, 10:21 PM
    • 332 Posts
    • 2,870 Thanks
    Sayschezza
    • #4
    • 15th Sep 18, 10:21 PM
    • #4
    • 15th Sep 18, 10:21 PM
    Have subscribed
    • trulymadlyhannah
    • By trulymadlyhannah 15th Sep 18, 10:29 PM
    • 131 Posts
    • 981 Thanks
    trulymadlyhannah
    • #5
    • 15th Sep 18, 10:29 PM
    • #5
    • 15th Sep 18, 10:29 PM
    We have a guarantee wallet too, but need to get better at registering warrentys. If we buy from Argos we usually buy replacement insurance too, it's saved us a few times over the last few years!
    Wife & SAHM of 4 children aged between 9 and 3
    Aiming to be mortgage free by 40
    blogging positive thinking
    financial independance minimalism
    Mortgage: AUG 2014: £109'946 Now: £76'600
    Term end: October 2033 With Op: Dec 2024
    • Olliebeak1951
    • By Olliebeak1951 15th Sep 18, 10:52 PM
    • 354 Posts
    • 3,168 Thanks
    Olliebeak1951
    • #6
    • 15th Sep 18, 10:52 PM
    • #6
    • 15th Sep 18, 10:52 PM
    Ollie Beak? Weren't you a friend of Wally Whyton? Gosh that takes me back....
    Originally posted by angela110660
    - that's where the nickname first came from ! My 'first name' is Olga, even though I was always known by my second name (Lilian). When some friends found out about it, I got nicknamed 'Olliebeak' ! Certainly didn't help when I had a boyfriend called 'Fred' in my late teens
    • bexster1975
    • By bexster1975 16th Sep 18, 7:44 AM
    • 1,311 Posts
    • 6,211 Thanks
    bexster1975
    • #7
    • 16th Sep 18, 7:44 AM
    • #7
    • 16th Sep 18, 7:44 AM
    Hello sewnuppockets

    I agree, you don't need lots of money to live well. I'm not retired, but have worked hard to cut outgoings and do so every time utilities etc come up for renewal. It has enabled me to become fully self employed, only working the hours I want. I use cashback websites when I switch providers ( just switched BB from BT to Sky) and often shop at charity shops and online for the things I need. On paper currently, I probably don't look like I earn very much as I'm only doing about ten paid hours a week, but as that covers all my costs and more, it has freed up my time to pursue other business and personal goals.

    I applaud your lifestyle, and seek to emulate it as time goes on. An excellent thread, I shall follow with interest.

    Bexster
    • VfM4meplse
    • By VfM4meplse 16th Sep 18, 8:34 AM
    • 26,672 Posts
    • 56,807 Thanks
    VfM4meplse
    • #8
    • 16th Sep 18, 8:34 AM
    • #8
    • 16th Sep 18, 8:34 AM
    We also enjoy treats and holidays by offsetting.

    That is every saving, even our recent switch of milk from Tesco to Home Bargains has netted us an extra £48.36 a year offset to spend on a little luxury or added to our holiday fund.
    Originally posted by Sewnuppockets
    There are swings and roundabouts. If you use this money for treats, how do you manage inflationary price rises?
    Value-for-money-for-me-puhleeze!

    "No man is worth, crawling on the earth"- adapted from Bob Crewe and Bob Gaudio

    Hope is not a strategy ...A child is for life, not just 18 years....Don't get me started on the NHS, because you won't win...If in doubt, don't pull out... I love chaz-ing!
    • PollyWollyDoodle
    • By PollyWollyDoodle 16th Sep 18, 9:31 AM
    • 1,134 Posts
    • 24,478 Thanks
    PollyWollyDoodle
    • #9
    • 16th Sep 18, 9:31 AM
    • #9
    • 16th Sep 18, 9:31 AM
    Sorry if I'm being dim, but what is 'offsetting'? I only know the term in relation to mortgages.
    "Inconceivable". "You keep using that word. I do not think it means what you think it means."
    • Farway
    • By Farway 16th Sep 18, 9:37 AM
    • 6,638 Posts
    • 11,227 Thanks
    Farway
    Sorry if I'm being dim, but what is 'offsetting'? I only know the term in relation to mortgages.
    Originally posted by PollyWollyDoodle
    Glad I'm not the only one who has no idea what the OP is talking about
    • Sewnuppockets
    • By Sewnuppockets 16th Sep 18, 10:45 AM
    • 2 Posts
    • 13 Thanks
    Sewnuppockets
    For those unsure, offsetting is applying your savings to another expenditure, not just frittering it away.
    For example. Our small saving of £48.36 almost paid our roadside recovery for the year at £50, which we had renegotiated down from £110 by using a comparison site. Same provider and better cover.

    End result. £100 down to £50 then £48.36 offset from milk and the roadside cover this year cost £1.64. Happy Days 😁

    Another gem we have found.
    If you are a M&S shopper, and receive discount vouchers occasionally, use them on sale items and you get a double discount, unlike other retailers who only allow discount on full price items.

    Itís a mindset you will get into.
    • PollyWollyDoodle
    • By PollyWollyDoodle 16th Sep 18, 11:05 AM
    • 1,134 Posts
    • 24,478 Thanks
    PollyWollyDoodle
    For those unsure, offsetting is applying your savings to another expenditure, not just frittering it away.
    Originally posted by Sewnuppockets
    Ah, thanks. I just call this budgeting!
    "Inconceivable". "You keep using that word. I do not think it means what you think it means."
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