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  • FIRST POST
    • ska lover
    • By ska lover 14th Sep 18, 10:24 PM
    • 2,936Posts
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    ska lover
    Schools providing Sanitary protection
    • #1
    • 14th Sep 18, 10:24 PM
    Schools providing Sanitary protection 14th Sep 18 at 10:24 PM
    I am reading currently about 'Period Poverty' in the UK..the sixth richest country in the world, allegedly, although you wouldn't know it

    Is it right that some Schools are now providing sanitary protection?

    You can buy Tesco everyday essentials pads for 0.23p

    Don't get me wrong, I am far from poverty bashing as I have been in some awful situations in the past.....all I am seeing is people bashing this as how can parents not afford 23 pence but we all know circumstances change

    When i was a teen, my mother used to insist we ASKED for money for STs - they weren't just 'provided'. I used to find this so excruciatingly embarrassing that I never would ask her as it was admitting ''HEY I'M ON MY PERIOD''..and when i was 13/14 - EVERYTHING was embarrassing

    I always swore if i had a daughter, that sanitary protection would be on my monthly shopping list and it would magically appear in her room and no discussion about it

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    Last edited by MSE Andrea; 19-09-2018 at 10:21 AM.
    The opposite of what you know...is also true
Page 4
    • annandale
    • By annandale 15th Sep 18, 11:05 PM
    • 1,240 Posts
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    annandale
    It’s not always about budgeting. It’s about not having enough to live on.

    When I had 1300 a month 3 quid for tampons was nothing. I now get 317 a month. I’m in between jobs but I may have some zero hours work coming up soon.

    Some women also do not have access to their own money. Financial abuse.

    You always get someone piping up. Fruit and veg are so cheap! Tampons are so cheap. I know someone who can make delicious meals for a pound a day.

    That is not reality for most people. There are foodbanks appealing for food every single day.

    Some people are in dire straits. It’s not simply a budgeting issue. It’s a poverty issue
    • annandale
    • By annandale 15th Sep 18, 11:10 PM
    • 1,240 Posts
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    annandale
    And that is why if people do donate to foodbanks please give in sanitary products and stuff like toothpaste. Shampoo.

    My fuel. Council tax as I pay the water charge as we do in Scotland. Bus fares and internet as I have to have it to jobsearch, takes up more than a third of the universal credit I get. That’s before other bills. Before I eat.

    I also don’t automatically qualify for warm home discount and I didn’t get the cold weather payment last year on two occasions as I’m not in a vulnerable group.

    And those of us up here will often pay higher fuel bills as it’s colder

    My issue is lack of money. I know how to budget.
    • Spendless
    • By Spendless 15th Sep 18, 11:12 PM
    • 20,473 Posts
    • 34,133 Thanks
    Spendless
    I can relate to this. My mother was far from useless in most others areas and we were far from poor, but she just didn't 'think' to make sure sanpro was always available. She had a hysterectomy at 32, before my periods started so sanpro wasn't on her radar, for some reason she just didn't seem to notice my cycle. Like you I was embarrassed to ask and also i'll admit to being less than organised and would often forget I was due so often had to improvise.
    Originally posted by peachyprice
    My experience was the same and though my mother hadn't had a hysterectomy was still having periods, she used tampons, something I wasn't confident about using until I was 16, 3 years after my periods started. Once on discovering I'd used my pocket money to buy sanitary towels she told me that I wasn't expected to but still there was no monthly supply for me.

    My own daughter 'hollers' more if she needs some as her supply has run out, but I did establish a drawer for her when she started hers, containing pads, dark knickers, 'nappy' sacks and a supply of chocolate sometimes finds it's way in. I'm organised more for her due to my own experiences.
    • mirko
    • By mirko 15th Sep 18, 11:46 PM
    • 167 Posts
    • 209 Thanks
    mirko
    I imagine if men had periods sanitary products would be available for free in every school and workplace as standard.

    "Poverty" aside it just seems like a no-brainer to have them available in schools, especially if they're only 23p as the original poster claims.
    [FONT="Courier New"]Now -
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    • KxMx
    • By KxMx 16th Sep 18, 12:13 AM
    • 7,536 Posts
    • 10,995 Thanks
    KxMx
    Annandale, I used the word "some" not "all"...

    Of course I realise for some it is not always a budgeting issue but a lack of money.

    But some is not all so that still leaves people who maybe need guidance and help in that area.
    • ViolaLass
    • By ViolaLass 16th Sep 18, 7:06 AM
    • 5,484 Posts
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    ViolaLass
    I did not call anyone a useless parent but unfortunately there are parents who care about other things more than their children Fact
    Originally posted by Both Feet on Terra Firma
    I didn't say there weren't. I asked what the relative proportions are and I pointed out that punishing the child doesn't help the situation.

    Care to comment on either of those points? Or would you rather just sit and judge?
    • kingfisherblue
    • By kingfisherblue 16th Sep 18, 8:58 AM
    • 8,262 Posts
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    kingfisherblue
    I wish that I was able to manage with a 23p pack of sanitary towels! I need a few packs of the night time pads fior the 7-10 days that I'm on, and always have. Doctors have checked for problems over the years, but I just have a naturally heavy flow. I eagerly await the point at which I no longer have periods. After all, my youngest child is now 18, I'm almost 50, and have no desire for any more children.
    • Tabbytabitha
    • By Tabbytabitha 16th Sep 18, 10:23 AM
    • 4,383 Posts
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    Tabbytabitha
    While that's definitely preferable to your situation, that friend might have wished she could have the conversation though. Seems a shame to me to not talk about something that mother and daughter will have in common, to have a moan and talk about ways to best cope with the various downsides.
    Originally posted by Red-Squirrel
    That's probably true these days but less so for earlier generations.
    • Tabbytabitha
    • By Tabbytabitha 16th Sep 18, 10:25 AM
    • 4,383 Posts
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    Tabbytabitha
    I wish that I was able to manage with a 23p pack of sanitary towels! I need a few packs of the night time pads fior the 7-10 days that I'm on, and always have. Doctors have checked for problems over the years, but I just have a naturally heavy flow. I eagerly await the point at which I no longer have periods. After all, my youngest child is now 18, I'm almost 50, and have no desire for any more children.
    Originally posted by kingfisherblue
    Before my hysterectomy I was the same. I was on the pill anyway throughout my twenties and early thirties so I solved the problem by just taking it all the time without the monthly break. Couldn't you do that?
    • Jojo the Tightfisted
    • By Jojo the Tightfisted 16th Sep 18, 11:45 AM
    • 25,461 Posts
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    Jojo the Tightfisted
    Before my hysterectomy I was the same. I was on the pill anyway throughout my twenties and early thirties so I solved the problem by just taking it all the time without the monthly break. Couldn't you do that?
    Originally posted by Tabbytabitha
    Depends - doctors can be very twitchy about people over 30 being on the pill, especially if they're overweight or have other risk factors; normally the progesterone only pill is all that they'll prescribe and, in my case, all that did was make me bleed every single day of the month (as the injection and Mirena coil does for some). And not all Gynaes, never mind GPs, like women taking the pill back to back like that because of some concern about it potentially masking serious issues or increasing the risk of pill related problems, as it means they're taking considerably more hormones than normal.

    Fortunately (in this case, not in any other sense), I've been infertile since I was 30, so after trying a couple of different brands with the same result, I just stopped taking anything and got on with it. As my periods are only heavy for a couple of days, usually, with just a very heavy/longer one every three months or so, I can manage with a cup - which wouldn't have been suitable for bleeding lightly every day. But it doesn't work like that for everybody.


    These days, when I'm curled up in bed on a bad one, I end up muttering darkly about how pointless it is to continue having the blasted things and roll on the menopause.
    I could dream to wide extremes, I could do or die: I could yawn and be withdrawn and watch the world go by.

    Yup you are officially Rock n Roll
    Originally posted by colinw
    • KxMx
    • By KxMx 16th Sep 18, 12:14 PM
    • 7,536 Posts
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    KxMx
    As I posted The Pill didn't do much for me, though I did take 2 packs together to reduce the number of periods. GP & Nurse knew this.

    Due to my weight 5 years ago I was changed to the PoP and have never looked back. What passes as a period now is light bleeding for a couple days 3-4 times a year. In fact i tend to find cramping the worse part!

    It really is a case of finding what suits the individual's circumstances, because what hasn't worked for the poster above has been so brilliant for me.
    Last edited by KxMx; 16-09-2018 at 12:20 PM.
    • GlasweJen
    • By GlasweJen 16th Sep 18, 12:18 PM
    • 6,753 Posts
    • 12,227 Thanks
    GlasweJen
    23p pads? I need industrial strength, extra long with the wings and the 5 drop absorbancy rating plus a tampon. Nothing wrong with me just a heavy bleeder, sometimes it gets so bad the GP takes pity and gives me tranexamic acid and noretisterone just to stop it for a while.

    I can't imagine how uncomfortable a 23p pad is, even using the cotton ones with decent branding things get sweaty down there pretty rapidly and the pain when one gets stuck to the skin and is pulling about when you move - horrendous! Then having to peel it off, oh god my eyes are watering at the thought.

    My periods must cost me a fortune, between the pads, tampons, heat packs and pain killers I'm much more than 23p a month.
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    • culpepper
    • By culpepper 16th Sep 18, 1:17 PM
    • 3,939 Posts
    • 7,342 Thanks
    culpepper
    I think these days , girls are getting their first monthly earlier than in the past. Once it wouldnt have been unusual for a 14 year old to be having her first one but now it can be 10 years old . Body weight is a factor for when they start and in the past a poor family would have also been a thin family. Nowadays weight is no indication of wealth or poverty.
    Perhaps there could be coupons for ST's as there are for some food stuffs for people with very low income. Maybe they could be sponsored by the sanitary towel companies, after all it could be a tax break for the company. They could then be redeemed at the shops or the school office . The towels could be marked in some way so that they dont get pilfered and sold on by the unscrupulous.
    • Tabbytabitha
    • By Tabbytabitha 16th Sep 18, 4:31 PM
    • 4,383 Posts
    • 6,980 Thanks
    Tabbytabitha
    Depends - doctors can be very twitchy about people over 30 being on the pill, especially if they're overweight or have other risk factors; normally the progesterone only pill is all that they'll prescribe and, in my case, all that did was make me bleed every single day of the month (as the injection and Mirena coil does for some). And not all Gynaes, never mind GPs, like women taking the pill back to back like that because of some concern about it potentially masking serious issues or increasing the risk of pill related problems, as it means they're taking considerably more hormones than normal.

    Fortunately (in this case, not in any other sense), I've been infertile since I was 30, so after trying a couple of different brands with the same result, I just stopped taking anything and got on with it. As my periods are only heavy for a couple of days, usually, with just a very heavy/longer one every three months or so, I can manage with a cup - which wouldn't have been suitable for bleeding lightly every day. But it doesn't work like that for everybody.


    These days, when I'm curled up in bed on a bad one, I end up muttering darkly about how pointless it is to continue having the blasted things and roll on the menopause.
    Originally posted by Jojo the Tightfisted
    I would never run my life based on what "some" doctors think - I'd switch to one who treated me like an adult.
    • Tabbytabitha
    • By Tabbytabitha 16th Sep 18, 4:35 PM
    • 4,383 Posts
    • 6,980 Thanks
    Tabbytabitha
    I think these days , girls are getting their first monthly earlier than in the past. Once it wouldnt have been unusual for a 14 year old to be having her first one but now it can be 10 years old . Body weight is a factor for when they start and in the past a poor family would have also been a thin family. Nowadays weight is no indication of wealth or poverty.
    Perhaps there could be coupons for ST's as there are for some food stuffs for people with very low income. Maybe they could be sponsored by the sanitary towel companies, after all it could be a tax break for the company. They could then be redeemed at the shops or the school office . The towels could be marked in some way so that they dont get pilfered and sold on by the unscrupulous.
    Originally posted by culpepper
    I'm 67 and started my periods when I was at primary school. I also came from a poor family where we were all somewhat overweight. It's really not a good idea to generalise.
    • annandale
    • By annandale 16th Sep 18, 5:04 PM
    • 1,240 Posts
    • 2,857 Thanks
    annandale
    Where are the coupons for food for people on a very low income? I'm on a very low income. I get no coupons. Are you talking about referrals to food banks? Most food banks allow people to be referred 3 times a year.

    Maybe sanitary products should be free full stop so that no one is stigmatised if they are too poor to afford them
    • kingfisherblue
    • By kingfisherblue 16th Sep 18, 5:12 PM
    • 8,262 Posts
    • 17,930 Thanks
    kingfisherblue
    Before my hysterectomy I was the same. I was on the pill anyway throughout my twenties and early thirties so I solved the problem by just taking it all the time without the monthly break. Couldn't you do that?
    Originally posted by Tabbytabitha

    I took the pill in my twenties and just into my thirties, but it didn't really have much effect on my periods. When I was in my early 30s, I had a suspected DVT (bank holiday weekend, so they couldn't actually test me for it until Tuesday morning - I had been sent to A&E on Friday night, and had to have Heparin injections all weekend). I was told that I coulnd't take the pill any longer. The mini-pill helped for a short while, but not much. I can't take that now, due to my age.


    It's just something that you get used to. It's not pleasant, but it's manageable with hourly changes of night time use sanitary towels. Overnight is far more difficult, and I have to get up regularly. I also use a continence sheet because of leakage. My GP is aware, but no help from them. It might be better if we had a female GP, but all three doctors are male, and have been for some years. I've had tests, but there are no signs of fibroids or any other problems. It's just the way I am.
    • humptydumptybits
    • By humptydumptybits 16th Sep 18, 5:18 PM
    • 2,067 Posts
    • 7,607 Thanks
    humptydumptybits
    I'm 67 and started my periods when I was at primary school. I also came from a poor family where we were all somewhat overweight. It's really not a good idea to generalise.
    Originally posted by Tabbytabitha
    I'm almost 65 and was a skinny kid in a family that was half fat, half thin and I also had my first period at 10. I don't think it was that unusual.
    • thorsoak
    • By thorsoak 16th Sep 18, 5:27 PM
    • 5,839 Posts
    • 27,149 Thanks
    thorsoak
    I do sympathise with all these posters who are having problems now - remember only too well how it felt to be sitting in a meeting, praying that nothing was going to show through my black suit! However, we were talking about providing protection for YOUNG girls - whose periods are always very haphazard when they start - a slight show one time, then a bloody deluge the next month. These girls - who can be as young as 9 or 10 - and in co-ed classes - feel awkward and embarrassed and frightened at the very least when their periods start - and surely it should be matter of fact that sanitary protection is available for them at school.
    • culpepper
    • By culpepper 16th Sep 18, 5:30 PM
    • 3,939 Posts
    • 7,342 Thanks
    culpepper
    Where are the coupons for food for people on a very low income? I'm on a very low income. I get no coupons. Are you talking about referrals to food banks? Most food banks allow people to be referred 3 times a year.

    Maybe sanitary products should be free full stop so that no one is stigmatised if they are too poor to afford them
    Originally posted by annandale

    https://www.healthystart.nhs.uk/
    They are not for everybody obviously but they are coupons for various foodstuffs

    I'm 67 and started my periods when I was at primary school. I also came from a poor family where we were all somewhat overweight. It's really not a good idea to generalise.
    Originally posted by Tabbytabitha
    Absolutely. My youngest sister was also overweight and our family lived a very hand to mouth existence.
    Still I believe our families were probably the exception not the rule given that very few children at school were actually overweight .
    I can remember several children who were all skin and bone, one was given seconds at lunch times almost every day.

    My point was that it is more likely that more children will need sanitary provision even earlier these days and they are most likely to be from the poorer families.
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