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  • FIRST POST
    • ska lover
    • By ska lover 14th Sep 18, 10:24 PM
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    ska lover
    Schools providing Sanitary protection
    • #1
    • 14th Sep 18, 10:24 PM
    Schools providing Sanitary protection 14th Sep 18 at 10:24 PM
    I am reading currently about 'Period Poverty' in the UK..the sixth richest country in the world, allegedly, although you wouldn't know it

    Is it right that some Schools are now providing sanitary protection?

    You can buy Tesco everyday essentials pads for 0.23p

    Don't get me wrong, I am far from poverty bashing as I have been in some awful situations in the past.....all I am seeing is people bashing this as how can parents not afford 23 pence but we all know circumstances change

    When i was a teen, my mother used to insist we ASKED for money for STs - they weren't just 'provided'. I used to find this so excruciatingly embarrassing that I never would ask her as it was admitting ''HEY I'M ON MY PERIOD''..and when i was 13/14 - EVERYTHING was embarrassing

    I always swore if i had a daughter, that sanitary protection would be on my monthly shopping list and it would magically appear in her room and no discussion about it
    Last edited by ska lover; 14-09-2018 at 10:34 PM.
    The opposite of what you know...is also true
Page 3
    • dontone
    • By dontone 15th Sep 18, 5:08 PM
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    dontone
    They'd be absent due to 'headaches' or 'stomachache' (attendance was less closely monitored then compared to now) or in the toilets making makeshift pads from wodges of toilet paper, rather than going to the office and asking publicly for a pad - particularly in coeducational schools, as it was common for boys to grab girls' bags and rifle through them in search of such 'horrors' as sanitary towels - and if they found tampons, they'd make idiotic comments about how the girl couldn't be a virgin as a result.
    Originally posted by Jojo the Tightfisted
    We had to put up with that too. It was quite embarrassing when it shouldn't have been. What didn't help was that we used to have a nurse come to school and educate girls on periods, sanitary protection as well, including the virgin/tampon myth. It would have been better if the lads were involved in that too, and watch them squirm.
    There was also a girl who was obsessed with periods to the point of weirdness. I remember going into the cubicle, and she noticed I had a wrapped towel in my hand. she, and a few others that she got to do it with her, peered over the cubicle to see what I was doing. It was mortifying. Luckily a friend of mine came in to the room and watched the cubicle while I sorted myself out. It turned out that she was a late starter, and was jealous that I had got my periods, and she and others hadn't. She was welcome to them.
    We weren't even allowed to leave the classroom should the worst happen, and if we needed emergency protection, the nurse would charge you 20p for an item.
    I would have thought that times would have been easier for girls now, it seems that with missing school due to not having adequate protection, & 'period poverty' I was wrong.
    Last edited by dontone; 16-09-2018 at 12:31 PM.
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    • Red-Squirrel
    • By Red-Squirrel 15th Sep 18, 5:09 PM
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    Red-Squirrel
    I remember when we were at school (1980s) you could go to the office if you had an emergency need for sanitary towels, but the school certainly wouldn't be expected to provide them to all pupils as a matter of course. We were an all-female school, in a rough area in London, with pupils from all backgrounds including very poor ones, yet nobody was absent due to not having sanitary protection.

    So what has changed between then and now?
    Originally posted by phryne
    How do you know?
    • Both Feet on Terra Firma
    • By Both Feet on Terra Firma 15th Sep 18, 5:15 PM
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    Both Feet on Terra Firma
    I imagine people/families of both types exist but in what proportion? I have no idea but if i felt as you, I would want to know.

    Also, if someone does have 'useless' parents who won't provide, how does the state NOT stepping in help that child? The state provides a lot of things - education, medical care, transport, books (libraries) etc. No one suggests that those things are pandering to 'useless' parents.
    Originally posted by ViolaLass
    I did not call anyone a useless parent but unfortunately there are parents who care about other things more than their children Fact
    Keeping both feet on solid ground
    • Rosemary7391
    • By Rosemary7391 15th Sep 18, 5:17 PM
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    Rosemary7391
    They'd be absent due to 'headaches' or 'stomachache' (attendance was less closely monitored then compared to now)


    <snip>


    it was common for boys to grab girls' bags and rifle through them in search of such 'horrors' as sanitary towels - and if they found tampons, they'd make idiotic comments about how the girl couldn't be a virgin as a result.

    In the case of one of my classmates, she, like many others, had to hope and pray that she wasn't too heavy that the toilet roll was insufficient or it fell out. Unfortunately, she was caught out when there was a fire alarm - she had to stand outside for 20 minutes with a large dark stain on her skirt and it was only when it began running down her legs that the staff did anything about it, at which point, she'd endured the eyes of up to 1,250 other kids, comments from both boys and girls and a complete absence of sympathy from her female teacher, despite it actually being due to her being so heavy that the pads she had been provided with from home to not last more than about an hour each - it took a senior male teacher in his late 50s to make the decision to take her inside and get her another pad from the office, whether the Fire Brigade, staff or Head liked it or not.

    She was usually absent for two days each month afterwards.
    Originally posted by Jojo the Tightfisted

    There will be times girls are caught short. With the best will in the world women donít always walk around with pads or tampons in their bag just incase their period starts.
    Originally posted by annandale
    I feel this board has just become a bash the poor board lately. Sweeping generalisations. Mocking any initiative that tries to help poorer people. A box of super plus tampons used to be 3 quid. Cost has probably gone down lately due to pound shops. But itís still tough.

    Iím in period poverty. Fuel poverty. Food poverty. Transport poverty. The basics. All poverty.
    Originally posted by annandale



    Three situations. All very different. Different solutions required. I'd argue that "solving" the last by providing sanitary protection everywhere actively hinders the solution to the first problem. People should talk about periods - should be normal, boys should know about it too. Not bully girls about it!



    I think foodbanks now have tampons etc. That's a step in the right direction. I happen to be one of those people who do carry a pad around with them - hardly takes much space. A colleague dealt with her forgetting by the simple expedient of asking me for one - handed over, job done. No need to create a mass drama over it. If a girl is always asking for tampons at school they're aware there might be other issues to watch out for. If they just get them from the toilet trouble at home is more hidden.
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    • phryne
    • By phryne 15th Sep 18, 5:24 PM
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    phryne
    They'd be absent due to 'headaches' or 'stomachache' (attendance was less closely monitored then compared to now) or in the toilets making makeshift pads from wodges of toilet paper, rather than going to the office and asking publicly for a pad - particularly in coeducational schools, as it was common for boys to grab girls' bags and rifle through them in search of such 'horrors' as sanitary towels - and if they found tampons, they'd make idiotic comments about how the girl couldn't be a virgin as a result.
    Originally posted by Jojo the Tightfisted
    The school toilet paper was that awful Izal, or similar. It was more like tracing paper and highly unlikely to be used as sanitary protection as it wasn't absorbent!

    Girls had fun and games going through others' bags, too. Many a time tampons got thrown around during high jinks.

    Girls (even girls who like my best friend, didn't have a mum) always managed to get sanitary towels and tampons, it was one thing they prioritised, knowing it wasn't something you could 'do without'. Learning to look after yourself is all part of growing up.
    • theoretica
    • By theoretica 15th Sep 18, 6:13 PM
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    theoretica
    It is interesting how we often see whatever the current situation is as normal. We expect toilet paper to be available, and bins for used pads, soap and drinking water. But we expect women to carry spare SP around with them. For many women that means carrying them all the time, just in case. If they are made available as standard I am sure that will become a normal convenience too.
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    • annandale
    • By annandale 15th Sep 18, 6:22 PM
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    annandale
    Not everyone can use mooncups btw.

    Also just like to say that there’s another post on the boards from someone who is struggling to afford to give their adult child 20 quid a week for uni. High earners. High outgoings.

    People are very quick to point the crap parenting tag at poor people.

    People who don’t have much spare even though they are wealthier seem to have more sympathy directed at them.
    • Jojo the Tightfisted
    • By Jojo the Tightfisted 15th Sep 18, 6:33 PM
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    Jojo the Tightfisted
    Three situations. All very different. Different solutions required. I'd argue that "solving" the last by providing sanitary protection everywhere actively hinders the solution to the first problem. People should talk about periods - should be normal, boys should know about it too. Not bully girls about it!



    I think foodbanks now have tampons etc. That's a step in the right direction. I happen to be one of those people who do carry a pad around with them - hardly takes much space. A colleague dealt with her forgetting by the simple expedient of asking me for one - handed over, job done. No need to create a mass drama over it. If a girl is always asking for tampons at school they're aware there might be other issues to watch out for. If they just get them from the toilet trouble at home is more hidden.
    Originally posted by Rosemary7391

    We are talking about groups of boys at school. They had been taught about periods at least 3-4 years previously - but, due to their inherent immaturity, the fact that they knew about menstruation and vaginas just led to the stupid behaviour when in a pack - even the most accepting/understanding of brother in a 1-2-1 situation behaves differently when in the pack or avoiding being seen as not part of it. It's because it's related to female bodies and their reproductive system that they are still so daft about it - just like they can be when the first couple of girls in their classes start wearing bras (I remember the 'so and so was seen wearing a black bra ' scandal when I was in Year 7).

    Personally, when I've spotted this sort of nonsense going on, I've normally suggested that if they are so curious, they come to detention after school and I'll provide them with a selection of sanitary protection to produce a fully illustrated essay about. Strangely, they don't tend to repeat the behaviour a second time once they have publicly gained an exhaustive knowledge of the subject. A girl giving them a smack square in the face also reduces the likelihood of reoffending, but I can't be seen to condone such responses...


    In any case, somebody who has multiple issues at home is likely to say they ran out/leaked/came on early/menstruate irregularly if they are queried on why they need sanpro more than once. It won't be the only thing that is spotted - not eating at lunchtime, not having money on their lunch account, not being clean, looking sad/pale/tired, etc, will be picked up on before needing a couple of pads is seen as an issue, as plenty of girls who have perfectly safe and happy homes will need them in any case; if asking for a sanitary towel more than once leads to students being taken aside by the SF Lead and asked if everything's alright at home/a safeguarding concern form is submitted for every occasion, the most vulnerable are less likely to ask in the first place.

    (Staff get caught out at times, too - it's happened to me twice - and I'd far rather be able to just pick one up from a box than have to go and ask in the presence of a 19 year old male member of staff. Or asking him because he's the only one in the office at the time. Needs must, as having to explain to your boss that you were late to the meeting/training because you were cleaning up after coming on a week early isn't much fun, either).
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    • Both Feet on Terra Firma
    • By Both Feet on Terra Firma 15th Sep 18, 6:37 PM
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    Both Feet on Terra Firma
    Not everyone can use mooncups btw.

    Also just like to say that there’s another post on the boards from someone who is struggling to afford to give their adult child 20 quid a week for uni. High earners. High outgoings.

    People are very quick to point the crap parenting tag at poor people.

    People who don’t have much spare even though they are wealthier seem to have more sympathy directed at them.
    Originally posted by annandale
    Define poor to me its not just financial it can also encompass time ,enrichment attention and love none of which costs money but plenty of children go without it so who would be the poorest the financially challenged child or the child deprived of time and love
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    • ska lover
    • By ska lover 15th Sep 18, 6:50 PM
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    ska lover
    I'm OK financially, I have a regular salary, can manage all the bills (and have access to credit if there's an emergency, such as the washing machine packing up), so I can order a relatively large shop just after payday each month, just as I can pay the lowest price for utilities, rather than being scalped by keymeters and have both the space and the money for a freezer to be able to store food that is on offer and bulk buy things such as toilet roll, rather than rely upon the more expensive smaller packs more frequently - but some people just aren't that comfortable.


    It's expensive to be poor. And I have no intention of ever being in that situation again, if I have anything to do with it.
    Originally posted by Jojo the Tightfisted

    Oh yes you are so right. Gosh I remember when my money came weekly from a very poor paying job and my weekly income as a single parent left me with £7 food shopping money per week...and no store cupboard back up like I am lucky to have now

    Thinking about it, I could have never done an online shop and met the minimum spend. I could have never spent a fiver on a bulk pack of loo roll as such, like you say.
    The opposite of what you know...is also true
    • ska lover
    • By ska lover 15th Sep 18, 6:53 PM
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    ska lover
    I feel this board has just become a bash the poor board lately. Sweeping generalisations. Mocking any initiative that tries to help poorer people. A box of super plus tampons used to be 3 quid. Cost has probably gone down lately due to pound shops. But it’s still tough.

    I’m in period poverty. Fuel poverty. Food poverty. Transport poverty. The basics. All poverty.

    So if people need a hand with one of these things why should they not get it.

    What difference does it make to your life if they do
    Originally posted by annandale


    I am sorry you feel that way. It was me that started the thread, and pointed out that I have been in that situation - I can't see anyone poor bashing to be honest - it was meant to be a discussion

    I am sorry you find this thread upsetting in some way. I can assure you that I do not feel more sympathy for a richer person who has less spare cash. I think their situation is a circumstance of their own making + the phrase 'cutting cloth accordingly' comes to mind for me

    I do think though that if these anything are being paid for out of tax payers money, then folk are entitled to an opinion. You don't need to take offence because they have a different opinion
    Last edited by ska lover; 15-09-2018 at 7:02 PM.
    The opposite of what you know...is also true
    • ska lover
    • By ska lover 15th Sep 18, 7:07 PM
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    ska lover
    Annabelle -

    Just to add as well, that as a lot of pple have pointed out - the lack of sanitary protection is not always a financial thing

    It can be accounted for, in some cases, at least... lack of tact on parents part - as in post one.. where I mention being expected to ask for it every month so I didn't ask out of momentous embarrassment...I would have rather gone without than had that mortifying conversation

    It had nothing to do with how rich or poor my parents were at the time.

    So not really sure how it has anything to do with poor bashing if I am honest - as people are discussing how it is an issue with more than one possible cause

    If anyone finds this thread upsetting I will ask for it to be deleted as it wasn't intended as such and I feel a bit sad that anyone be upset or feel picked on
    Last edited by ska lover; 15-09-2018 at 7:10 PM.
    The opposite of what you know...is also true
    • ska lover
    • By ska lover 15th Sep 18, 7:13 PM
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    ska lover
    I remember being extremely jealous of a school friend, whose mother would just keep her stocked up. Buy the protection and pop it in the daughters room , no conversation needed. I was wowed that my friend had a drawer full

    I remember feeling horribly jealous of this.
    The opposite of what you know...is also true
    • Red-Squirrel
    • By Red-Squirrel 15th Sep 18, 8:01 PM
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    Red-Squirrel
    I remember being extremely jealous of a school friend, whose mother would just keep her stocked up. Buy the protection and pop it in the daughters room , no conversation needed. I was wowed that my friend had a drawer full

    I remember feeling horribly jealous of this.
    Originally posted by ska lover
    While that's definitely preferable to your situation, that friend might have wished she could have the conversation though. Seems a shame to me to not talk about something that mother and daughter will have in common, to have a moan and talk about ways to best cope with the various downsides.
    • pickledonionspaceraider
    • By pickledonionspaceraider 15th Sep 18, 8:08 PM
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    pickledonionspaceraider
    Seems a shame to me to not talk about something that mother and daughter will have in common.
    Originally posted by Red-Squirrel
    I don't know if they discussed it in general. I just know there was not the need for a forced announcement each month

    Completely depends on the parent. If they make it uncomfortable and a big drama then it is not going to happen..and a lot of teenage girls are embarrased, I was...but not helped by a Mother who would have made a drama about it, and my Dad would have been called into the room etc

    My mother was not one to talk about stuff like periods. I only first found out about it all at school - when the nurse came and told all the girls
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    • Sunny Intervals
    • By Sunny Intervals 15th Sep 18, 8:25 PM
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    Sunny Intervals
    I don't know if they discussed it in general. I just know there was not the need for a forced announcement each month
    Originally posted by pickledonionspaceraider




    Sorry, that tickled me.


    "Mother! The time of bleeding is upon me! Bring forth the sanitary protection!"
    • happyandcontented
    • By happyandcontented 15th Sep 18, 8:52 PM
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    happyandcontented
    I don't know if they discussed it in general. I just know there was not the need for a forced announcement each month

    Completely depends on the parent. If they make it uncomfortable and a big drama then it is not going to happen..and a lot of teenage girls are embarrased, I was...but not helped by a Mother who would have made a drama about it, and my Dad would have been called into the room etc

    My mother was not one to talk about stuff like periods. I only first found out about it all at school - when the nurse came and told all the girls
    Originally posted by pickledonionspaceraider
    I thought ska lover was the poster who said that, but you seemed to answer as her....
    • pickledonionspaceraider
    • By pickledonionspaceraider 15th Sep 18, 8:59 PM
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    pickledonionspaceraider
    I thought ska lover was the poster who said that, but you seemed to answer as her....
    Originally posted by happyandcontented
    Can a problem only be had by one person? If I was saying I was poor, would you say the same?

    Bit of an unfair comment

    People quote stuff that was not aimed at them all the time, if they feel it relevant...Just as you did
    Last edited by pickledonionspaceraider; 15-09-2018 at 9:04 PM.
    You only live once...so make sure you spend 15 hours on the internet every day desperately seeking validation from strangers
    • happyandcontented
    • By happyandcontented 15th Sep 18, 9:04 PM
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    happyandcontented
    Can a problem only be had by one person? If I was saying I was poor, would you say the same?

    Bit of an unfair comment
    Originally posted by pickledonionspaceraider
    If you re read your comment it says ' I don't know if they discussed it' who is they if not the person ska lover referred to?

    It just struck me as a strange way of phrasing the answer...

    Apologies, if you and ska lover are not one and the same but I suspect you can see how I might have arrived at that conclusion.
    • pickledonionspaceraider
    • By pickledonionspaceraider 15th Sep 18, 9:18 PM
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    pickledonionspaceraider
    If you re read your comment it says ' I don't know if they discussed it' who is they if not the person ska lover referred to?

    It just struck me as a strange way of phrasing the answer...

    Apologies, if you and ska lover are not one and the same but I suspect you can see how I might have arrived at that conclusion.
    Originally posted by happyandcontented
    I wouldn't know (cos I don't know them) I should have worded it better eh?

    No we aren't the same person, and no worries

    I wonder if there are alteregos where people respond to their own threads? Does make you wonder though
    You only live once...so make sure you spend 15 hours on the internet every day desperately seeking validation from strangers
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