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  • FIRST POST
    • ska lover
    • By ska lover 14th Sep 18, 10:24 PM
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    ska lover
    Schools providing Sanitary protection
    • #1
    • 14th Sep 18, 10:24 PM
    Schools providing Sanitary protection 14th Sep 18 at 10:24 PM
    I am reading currently about 'Period Poverty' in the UK..the sixth richest country in the world, allegedly, although you wouldn't know it

    Is it right that some Schools are now providing sanitary protection?

    You can buy Tesco everyday essentials pads for 0.23p

    Don't get me wrong, I am far from poverty bashing as I have been in some awful situations in the past.....all I am seeing is people bashing this as how can parents not afford 23 pence but we all know circumstances change

    When i was a teen, my mother used to insist we ASKED for money for STs - they weren't just 'provided'. I used to find this so excruciatingly embarrassing that I never would ask her as it was admitting ''HEY I'M ON MY PERIOD''..and when i was 13/14 - EVERYTHING was embarrassing

    I always swore if i had a daughter, that sanitary protection would be on my monthly shopping list and it would magically appear in her room and no discussion about it

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    Last edited by MSE Andrea; 19-09-2018 at 10:21 AM.
    The opposite of what you know...is also true
Page 2
    • Red-Squirrel
    • By Red-Squirrel 15th Sep 18, 11:15 AM
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    Red-Squirrel
    If we're really about efficiency we could teach them about reuseable options - I have a mooncup and its brilliant !
    Originally posted by Rosemary7391
    Unless school toilets have improved a lot since I had to use them, I don't think its a fair expectation of teenage girls that they use a mooncup.
    • Abbafan1972
    • By Abbafan1972 15th Sep 18, 11:44 AM
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    Abbafan1972
    Unless school toilets have improved a lot since I had to use them, I don't think its a fair expectation of teenage girls that they use a mooncup.
    Originally posted by Red-Squirrel
    So you have to wash out and re-insert - so that means you have to make yourself decent while you wash it out and then go back into the cubicle - so you won't have protection on while you're washing it?

    Wouldn't you need to have 2 mooncups and just put the clean one straight in?
    Winging it since 1972
    • Rosemary7391
    • By Rosemary7391 15th Sep 18, 12:09 PM
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    Rosemary7391
    Except on the first day I only empty it morning and evening at home. You can just wipe it with tissue or rinse with water from a bottle so no need to leave the cubicle. I agree it isn't the way to start though. But many older teenagers certainly could manage.
    Slinkies 2018 Challenge - 0/80lb lost
    • Jojo the Tightfisted
    • By Jojo the Tightfisted 15th Sep 18, 12:17 PM
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    Jojo the Tightfisted
    Hmmm interesting point..What area do you live in? Tescos do evening deliveries for 1 in my area.

    I love home shopping deliveries, so much cheaper than driving there, picking, packing and the two hour of my life and for a quid, can't really beat it

    Might be cheaper to look into home shopping. It is an idea if no one has thought of it. I mean no one would spend 6 bus fare to buy something for 29pence and then only purchase only enough to carry home on a bus..... and if they would, then sorry but some people are actually beyond helping as common sense has lost it's way big time

    Common sense is free. Surely if a person had 6 to spend, and only wanted STs they would buy local for 2 and save 4...Or get them thrown in at 29pence wit a weeks shopping and spend One Pound to get the whole lot delivered

    one fab thing about having it delivered is you can chose substitutes and if they have't got the cheapo brand in stock, you will get subbed with better
    Originally posted by ska lover
    South London. Surrounded by the little franchise supermarket shops, none of whom do the super cheap brands. Minimum basket spend for free delivery is 40, which, if money is a problem (eg, ZHC, UC delays, etc), will make it unaffordable for some people.


    I'm OK financially, I have a regular salary, can manage all the bills (and have access to credit if there's an emergency, such as the washing machine packing up), so I can order a relatively large shop just after payday each month, just as I can pay the lowest price for utilities, rather than being scalped by keymeters and have both the space and the money for a freezer to be able to store food that is on offer and bulk buy things such as toilet roll, rather than rely upon the more expensive smaller packs more frequently - but some people just aren't that comfortable.


    It's expensive to be poor. And I have no intention of ever being in that situation again, if I have anything to do with it.
    I could dream to wide extremes, I could do or die: I could yawn and be withdrawn and watch the world go by.

    Yup you are officially Rock n Roll
    Originally posted by colinw
    • annandale
    • By annandale 15th Sep 18, 2:29 PM
    • 1,239 Posts
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    annandale
    Unless you have very heavy periods. Which I have. The mp Daniele rowley posted how much she spends. A lot more than 23p. I’ve always had to use super plus tampons and there have been times I’ve leaked through them.

    Not 23p. Far more than that. And my periods always lasted a week.

    Women shouldn’t be in period poverty. Some are. Lots of people are in poverty full stop. I am currently but I don’t use places that give me free access to tampons or towels. There are people far worse off than me.

    Why shouldn’t women get free access to towels or tampons if they need it.

    The Scottish govt is leading the way on this. Good for them.

    If you are living on 73 quid a week at the moment like I am and some people live on less why shouldn’t women get access to free sanitary products?

    There are people using foodbanks. Where do they get the money for sanitary protection if they can’t afford to eat
    • annandale
    • By annandale 15th Sep 18, 2:32 PM
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    annandale
    I feel this board has just become a bash the poor board lately. Sweeping generalisations. Mocking any initiative that tries to help poorer people. A box of super plus tampons used to be 3 quid. Cost has probably gone down lately due to pound shops. But it’s still tough.

    I’m in period poverty. Fuel poverty. Food poverty. Transport poverty. The basics. All poverty.

    So if people need a hand with one of these things why should they not get it.

    What difference does it make to your life if they do
    • annandale
    • By annandale 15th Sep 18, 2:35 PM
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    annandale
    In my area it’s not just schools. It’s foootball clubs as well. Although there’s an argument that if you can afford to go to a game you can afford tampons. However people can and do get caught out.

    Tampons and towels should be free. No woman should be in period poverty.

    If someone is sanctioned by the Dwp for example how do they afford tampons.

    And for people lining up to say don’t get sanctioned

    Have a look at the list of things people get sanctioned for
    • phryne
    • By phryne 15th Sep 18, 2:41 PM
    • 444 Posts
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    phryne
    I remember when we were at school (1980s) you could go to the office if you had an emergency need for sanitary towels, but the school certainly wouldn't be expected to provide them to all pupils as a matter of course. We were an all-female school, in a rough area in London, with pupils from all backgrounds including very poor ones, yet nobody was absent due to not having sanitary protection.

    So what has changed between then and now?
    • Both Feet on Terra Firma
    • By Both Feet on Terra Firma 15th Sep 18, 3:24 PM
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    Both Feet on Terra Firma
    I really dont know how i feel about this on one hand i feel that sometimes we make life easy for those people who for want of better words cannot be bothered and know someone else will provide and on the other hand those working families with no fixed income i feel should be helped
    Keeping both feet on solid ground
    • barbarawright
    • By barbarawright 15th Sep 18, 3:31 PM
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    barbarawright
    Sanitary protection is as essential as lavatory paper which I assume nobody is suggesting shouldn't be provided by schools. Why should one be free and not the other?
    • Guineapigsqueaks
    • By Guineapigsqueaks 15th Sep 18, 3:36 PM
    • 261 Posts
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    Guineapigsqueaks
    Perhaps it's the inadequacy of the parents, perhaps not, I don't really know enough about the circumstances of those people to know. I do know that school age girls can't earn an income so can't buy it for themselves. If their parents don't buy it for them, what are they to do? I wouldn't let my daughter go without this essential dignity and wouldn't knowingly let any of her friends do so either.
    When my Dad was a child, he was very poorly looked after by his useless Mother. He was lucky to have a school friend whose Mum regularly cooked extra tea and made sure my Dad was fed and taken care of. What a difference she made, not just to my Dad, but to his future children (including me), because he saw how life should be. That is what we should be aiming for.
    Guineapigsqueaks x


    Keep Smiling
    • gettingtheresometime
    • By gettingtheresometime 15th Sep 18, 3:40 PM
    • 4,250 Posts
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    gettingtheresometime
    I remember when we were at school (1980s) you could go to the office if you had an emergency need for sanitary towels, but the school certainly wouldn't be expected to provide them to all pupils as a matter of course. We were an all-female school, in a rough area in London, with pupils from all backgrounds including very poor ones, yet nobody was absent due to not having sanitary protection.

    So what has changed between then and now?
    Originally posted by phryne
    This is the very question that needs to be answered yet I don't think the answer is a simple one but a combination of reasons.
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    • ViolaLass
    • By ViolaLass 15th Sep 18, 3:46 PM
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    ViolaLass
    I really dont know how i feel about this on one hand i feel that sometimes we make life easy for those people who for want of better words cannot be bothered and know someone else will provide and on the other hand those working families with no fixed income i feel should be helped
    Originally posted by Both Feet on Terra Firma
    I imagine people/families of both types exist but in what proportion? I have no idea but if i felt as you, I would want to know.

    Also, if someone does have 'useless' parents who won't provide, how does the state NOT stepping in help that child? The state provides a lot of things - education, medical care, transport, books (libraries) etc. No one suggests that those things are pandering to 'useless' parents.
    • barbarawright
    • By barbarawright 15th Sep 18, 3:53 PM
    • 1,732 Posts
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    barbarawright
    I remember when we were at school (1980s) you could go to the office if you had an emergency need for sanitary towels, but the school certainly wouldn't be expected to provide them to all pupils as a matter of course. We were an all-female school, in a rough area in London, with pupils from all backgrounds including very poor ones, yet nobody was absent due to not having sanitary protection.

    So what has changed between then and now?
    Originally posted by phryne
    How do you know nobody was absent for that reason? It's not likely that anyone would admit to it.
    • thorsoak
    • By thorsoak 15th Sep 18, 3:56 PM
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    thorsoak
    Look : when I started school in 1947, at age 4, we had to ask the teacher for toilet paper! In front of the whole class "please Mrs Thomas may I have the paper please"! I still remember how embarrassed that made me feel - so embarrassed that I would take paper from home so that I wouldn't have to ask. School toilet paper was horrible - scratchy, Izal paper - not at all soft you could use it as tracing paper - in fact tracing paper was probably softer.

    Now, it would be considered cause for complaint if there was no loo roll in each and every loo. So why should we be quibbling about sanitary protection for young girls - and they can be as young as 8 or 9 today. Or do you think that parents should go back to providing toilet paper?
    • annandale
    • By annandale 15th Sep 18, 4:33 PM
    • 1,239 Posts
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    annandale
    Being poor is not always down to crap parenting. Is it? Is jack monroe a crap parent for example. Just because she lived below the poverty line for a time?

    There will be times girls are caught short. With the best will in the world women don’t always walk around with pads or tampons in their bag just incase their period starts.

    If there are families who rely on holiday clubs to feed their kids and have to rely on uniform banks then they might not have that spare 23p just when they need them.

    As before I spent a lot more than 23p in my time. I would be paying 2.99 for super tampons and I would be on my second box by the time my period ended.
    • annandale
    • By annandale 15th Sep 18, 4:36 PM
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    annandale
    There are some excellent parents who live below the line. Danielle rowley said that she needed pads. Tampons. And night pads. She probably spent 10 pounds a week. Not 23p.

    She’s an mp on 74k a week. It’s easier for her.

    Please don’t quote the pads are 23p argument when talking about periods. Not all women or girls are the same.

    In my teens I had to wear tampons and pads. Daily.
    • annandale
    • By annandale 15th Sep 18, 4:38 PM
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    annandale
    And as for the that’s what child benefit is for argument. Some families might be living on the bare bones. The less poor families have to pay out for essentials the better.

    However. Pads and tampons should be free for all women. They are essentials. No one chooses to have periods. And no one should be in period poverty
    • Jojo the Tightfisted
    • By Jojo the Tightfisted 15th Sep 18, 4:51 PM
    • 25,337 Posts
    • 102,340 Thanks
    Jojo the Tightfisted
    I remember when we were at school (1980s) you could go to the office if you had an emergency need for sanitary towels, but the school certainly wouldn't be expected to provide them to all pupils as a matter of course. We were an all-female school, in a rough area in London, with pupils from all backgrounds including very poor ones, yet nobody was absent due to not having sanitary protection.

    So what has changed between then and now?
    Originally posted by phryne
    This is the very question that needs to be answered yet I don't think the answer is a simple one but a combination of reasons.
    Originally posted by gettingtheresometime

    They'd be absent due to 'headaches' or 'stomachache' (attendance was less closely monitored then compared to now) or in the toilets making makeshift pads from wodges of toilet paper, rather than going to the office and asking publicly for a pad - particularly in coeducational schools, as it was common for boys to grab girls' bags and rifle through them in search of such 'horrors' as sanitary towels - and if they found tampons, they'd make idiotic comments about how the girl couldn't be a virgin as a result.

    In the case of one of my classmates, she, like many others, had to hope and pray that she wasn't too heavy that the toilet roll was insufficient or it fell out. Unfortunately, she was caught out when there was a fire alarm - she had to stand outside for 20 minutes with a large dark stain on her skirt and it was only when it began running down her legs that the staff did anything about it, at which point, she'd endured the eyes of up to 1,250 other kids, comments from both boys and girls and a complete absence of sympathy from her female teacher, despite it actually being due to her being so heavy that the pads she had been provided with from home to not last more than about an hour each - it took a senior male teacher in his late 50s to make the decision to take her inside and get her another pad from the office, whether the Fire Brigade, staff or Head liked it or not.

    She was usually absent for two days each month afterwards.
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    Yup you are officially Rock n Roll
    Originally posted by colinw
    • dontone
    • By dontone 15th Sep 18, 5:08 PM
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    dontone
    They'd be absent due to 'headaches' or 'stomachache' (attendance was less closely monitored then compared to now) or in the toilets making makeshift pads from wodges of toilet paper, rather than going to the office and asking publicly for a pad - particularly in coeducational schools, as it was common for boys to grab girls' bags and rifle through them in search of such 'horrors' as sanitary towels - and if they found tampons, they'd make idiotic comments about how the girl couldn't be a virgin as a result.
    Originally posted by Jojo the Tightfisted
    We had to put up with that too. It was quite embarrassing when it shouldn't have been. What didn't help was that we used to have a nurse come to school and educate girls on periods, sanitary protection as well, including the virgin/tampon myth. It would have been better if the lads were involved in that too, and watch them squirm.
    There was also a girl who was obsessed with periods to the point of weirdness. I remember going into the cubicle, and she noticed I had a wrapped towel in my hand. she, and a few others that she got to do it with her, peered over the cubicle to see what I was doing. It was mortifying. Luckily a friend of mine came in to the room and watched the cubicle while I sorted myself out. It turned out that she was a late starter, and was jealous that I had got my periods, and she and others hadn't. She was welcome to them.
    We weren't even allowed to leave the classroom should the worst happen, and if we needed emergency protection, the nurse would charge you 20p for an item.
    I would have thought that times would have been easier for girls now, it seems that with missing school due to not having adequate protection, & 'period poverty' I was wrong.
    Last edited by dontone; 16-09-2018 at 12:31 PM.
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