Your browser isn't supported
It looks like you're using an old web browser. To get the most out of the site and to ensure guides display correctly, we suggest upgrading your browser now. Download the latest:

Welcome to the MSE Forums

We're home to a fantastic community of MoneySavers but anyone can post. Please exercise caution & report spam, illegal, offensive or libellous posts/messages: click "report" or email forumteam@. Skimlinks & other affiliated links are turned on

Search
  • FIRST POST
    • onejontwo
    • By onejontwo 14th Sep 18, 6:08 PM
    • 1,035Posts
    • 291Thanks
    onejontwo
    Maths question.
    • #1
    • 14th Sep 18, 6:08 PM
    Maths question. 14th Sep 18 at 6:08 PM
    Probably wrong thread, but I've been racking my brains over this simple maths question:- If a person travels 35 km in 1 hour 10 mins. what is her average speed?

    If you give me the answer please tell me how you arrived at the answer.
Page 2
    • TheCyclingProgrammer
    • By TheCyclingProgrammer 15th Sep 18, 1:35 PM
    • 3,224 Posts
    • 1,892 Thanks
    TheCyclingProgrammer
    He travels 35km/1.167h, that makes it 29.99km/h
    Originally posted by arciere
    The answer is 30. You’ve lost precision because you’ve rounded 1/6th to the nearest 100th. Sometimes it’s easier to just use fractions.
    • John Gray
    • By John Gray 15th Sep 18, 2:04 PM
    • 5,260 Posts
    • 3,060 Thanks
    John Gray
    +1 for the correct use of 'precision'!
    • ballyblack
    • By ballyblack 15th Sep 18, 3:02 PM
    • 3,756 Posts
    • 1,963 Thanks
    ballyblack
    it should be MPH anyway ..................roll on Brexit
    • tempus_fugit
    • By tempus_fugit 15th Sep 18, 7:11 PM
    • 484 Posts
    • 433 Thanks
    tempus_fugit
    Apologies, Italian here.
    Originally posted by arciere
    No need to apologise. It could be either gender but we are just being forced to show some form of "equality" by forcing us all to use the feminine forms. I always say "he/him" as I am male.
    Retired at age 56 after having "light bulb moment" due to reading MSE and its forums. Have been converted to the "budget to zero" concept and use YNAB for all monthly budgeting and long term goals.
    • coffeehound
    • By coffeehound 15th Sep 18, 8:47 PM
    • 1,780 Posts
    • 2,728 Thanks
    coffeehound
    Pretty difficult question for 10 year olds
    • onomatopoeia99
    • By onomatopoeia99 15th Sep 18, 11:11 PM
    • 4,561 Posts
    • 10,435 Thanks
    onomatopoeia99
    Pretty difficult question for 10 year olds
    Originally posted by coffeehound
    Basic multiplication and division of integers, or "whole numbers" as we called them when I was that age at the end of the 1970s. Given I remember we were doing long multiplication and division at the same age, I'd go for it being a pretty straightforward question for a 10 year old.
    INTP, nerd, libertarian and scifi geek.
    Home is where my books are.
    • coffeehound
    • By coffeehound 16th Sep 18, 5:34 AM
    • 1,780 Posts
    • 2,728 Thanks
    coffeehound
    Basic multiplication and division of integers, or "whole numbers" as we called them when I was that age at the end of the 1970s. Given I remember we were doing long multiplication and division at the same age, I'd go for it being a pretty straightforward question for a 10 year old.
    Originally posted by onomatopoeia99
    Really - long division at primary school? Cant honestly remember what we were doing at that age. This question involves deeper understanding than the basic arithmetic to know what to do i suppose. Anyway Im impressed that 10 year olds could tackle it.
    • jackieblack
    • By jackieblack 16th Sep 18, 6:48 AM
    • 7,993 Posts
    • 11,754 Thanks
    jackieblack
    Pretty difficult question for 10 year olds
    Originally posted by coffeehound
    Not really
    Basic multiplication and division of integers, or "whole numbers" as we called them when I was that age at the end of the 1970s. Given I remember we were doing long multiplication and division at the same age, I'd go for it being a pretty straightforward question for a 10 year old.
    Originally posted by onomatopoeia99
    Yep, me too
    Really - long division at primary school? Cant honestly remember what we were doing at that age. This question involves deeper understanding than the basic arithmetic to know what to do i suppose. Anyway Im impressed that 10 year olds could tackle it.
    Originally posted by coffeehound
    An 10 year old of average ability would be expected to recognise that 35 is a factor of 70.

    Upper key stage 2 - years 5 and 6
    The principal focus of mathematics teaching in upper key stage 2 is to ensure that pupils extend their understanding of the number system and place value to include larger integers. This should develop the connections that pupils make between multiplication and division with fractions, decimals, percentages and ratio.

    At this stage, pupils should develop their ability to solve a wider range of problems, including increasingly complex properties of numbers and arithmetic, and problems demanding efficient written and mental methods of calculation.
    With this foundation in arithmetic, pupils are introduced to the language of algebra as a means for solving a variety of problems. Teaching in geometry and measures should consolidate and extend knowledge developed in number. Teaching should also ensure that pupils classify shapes with increasingly complex geometric properties and that they learn the vocabulary they need to describe them.

    By the end of year 6, pupils should be fluent in written methods for all 4 operations, including long multiplication and division, and in working with fractions, decimals
    and percentages.

    https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/national-curriculum-in-england-mathematics-programmes-of-study/national-curriculum-in-england-mathematics-programmes-of-study#year-6-programme-of-study
    Last edited by jackieblack; 16-09-2018 at 6:56 AM.
    2.22kWp Solar PV system installed Oct 2010, Fronius IG20 Inverter,
    south facing (-5 deg), 30 degree pitch, no shading

    Quidquid Latine dictum sit altum videtur
    (Revera linguam latinam vix cognovi )
    • dogmaryxx
    • By dogmaryxx 16th Sep 18, 9:11 AM
    • 2,135 Posts
    • 2,563 Thanks
    dogmaryxx
    Would have been a mental arithmetic question in 1952 at my primary school.

    Could you pass the 11-plus? Exam papers first used in the 1950s

    ARITHMETIC
    Read the following:

    1. 3,755 is multiplied by 25 and the result is divided by 125. Write down the answer.

    2. A motorist leaves home at 10.15am and drives at 32 miles per hour. He stops for lunch from noon to 1.45pm and then continues his journey at 30 miles per hour. How many miles has he travelled by 5pm?

    3. An aeroplane uses 100 gallons of petrol for a flight of 150 miles. How far could it fly using 40 gallons?

    4. Write in figures: twelve thousand and twelve.

    5. A race started at 23 minutes past three and finished at 23 minutes to four. How long did it take?

    6. Simplify:

    a) 1,000 - 10

    b) 25 x 12

    c) 615 divided by 3

    d) 0.5 + 0.75

    e) The fractions 4/5 - 7/10

    7. Of 800 people living in a village, half are men and half women. A quarter of the men leave the village to join the army. How many more women then men now remain?

    8. Multiply 7,296 by 479.

    9. Which of these numbers is divisible by 4 without any remainder: 214, 230, 226, 224, 218?

    10. Add all the odd numbers between 12 and 20.


    NO CALCULATORS ALLOWED
    • prowla
    • By prowla 16th Sep 18, 9:14 AM
    • 10,067 Posts
    • 8,284 Thanks
    prowla
    (35 / 70) x 60


    ie. 35/70 =miles per minute, then x60 for miles per hour.
    • coffeehound
    • By coffeehound 17th Sep 18, 10:02 AM
    • 1,780 Posts
    • 2,728 Thanks
    coffeehound
    Not really

    Yep, me too

    An 10 year old of average ability would be expected to recognise that 35 is a factor of 70.
    Originally posted by jackieblack
    Not sure why 35 being a factor of 70 would help with that calc? Well i take your point that this would be within the syllabus but to be honest i doubt that every average 20- or 30-year-old would know how to tackle it!
    • neilmcl
    • By neilmcl 17th Sep 18, 10:45 AM
    • 11,588 Posts
    • 8,374 Thanks
    neilmcl
    Not sure why 35 being a factor of 70 would help with that calc? Well i take your point that this would be within the syllabus but to be honest i doubt that every average 20- or 30-year-old would know how to tackle it!
    Originally posted by coffeehound
    Which says a lot more about the education system over the past 20 years or so, in particular with reference to the core subjects of maths, English and science.

    Personally I think it started to go downhill with the introduction of GCSEs.
    • Cornucopia
    • By Cornucopia 17th Sep 18, 11:29 AM
    • 10,691 Posts
    • 10,981 Thanks
    Cornucopia
    Could you pass the 11-plus? Exam papers first used in the 1950s...
    Originally posted by dogmaryxx
    I don't think there's anything particularly tricky there - perhaps a couple where you would need to read the question carefully? Barring silly mistakes or misunderstanding the question I would say everything was doable. Do we know how much time they would have been given?

    I can't help thinking that the motorist in Q2 was almost certainly wearing a flat cap and driving a Morris Traveller.

    Last edited by Cornucopia; Yesterday at 1:25 PM.
    I'm a Board Guide on the Phones & TV, Techie Stuff, In My Home,
    The Money Savers Arms and Food Shopping boards. I'm a volunteer to help the boards run smoothly, and I can move and merge threads there. Any views (especially those on the UK TV Licence) are mine and not the official line of moneysavingexpert.com.

    Board guides are not moderators. If you spot an inappropriate or illegal post then please report it to forumteam@moneysavingexpert.com
    • DoaM
    • By DoaM 17th Sep 18, 1:11 PM
    • 4,698 Posts
    • 4,689 Thanks
    DoaM
    Not sure why 35 being a factor of 70 would help with that calc?
    Originally posted by coffeehound
    The why has already been explained ... even in the post immediately before yours! (Albeit prowla used miles instead of kilometres, so obviously didn't read the question properly)
    Diary of a madman
    Walk the line again today
    Entries of confusion
    Dear diary, I'm here to stay
    • Cornucopia
    • By Cornucopia 17th Sep 18, 1:29 PM
    • 10,691 Posts
    • 10,981 Thanks
    Cornucopia
    In a classroom where "real" problem solving is being emphasised over use of tools like calculators (and before that, log tables and sliderules) these sort of easy breakdown equations are often used.

    You have to recognise the shortcuts, though, to save yourself the hassle and work that may not be practical in the time allowed.

    A classic was always the approximation of Pi as 22/7 - easily worked into easy to break down equations (certainly much easier than the true, irrational value).
    I'm a Board Guide on the Phones & TV, Techie Stuff, In My Home,
    The Money Savers Arms and Food Shopping boards. I'm a volunteer to help the boards run smoothly, and I can move and merge threads there. Any views (especially those on the UK TV Licence) are mine and not the official line of moneysavingexpert.com.

    Board guides are not moderators. If you spot an inappropriate or illegal post then please report it to forumteam@moneysavingexpert.com
    • GunJack
    • By GunJack 17th Sep 18, 3:12 PM
    • 10,346 Posts
    • 7,750 Thanks
    GunJack
    A classic was always the approximation of Pi as 22/7 - easily worked into easy to break down equations (certainly much easier than the true, irrational value).
    Originally posted by Cornucopia
    Yeah, that made lots of stuff quicker....

    I still despair over some of the methods they have taught for long division/multiplication over the last 20 or so years....my oldest used to marvel at how quick they could be done when helping him with his homework, but they'd brainwashed the kids so much he couldn't get it for a looong time
    ......Gettin' There, Wherever There is......
    • jackieblack
    • By jackieblack 17th Sep 18, 6:21 PM
    • 7,993 Posts
    • 11,754 Thanks
    jackieblack
    The why has already been explained ... even in the post immediately before yours! (Albeit prowla used miles instead of kilometres, so obviously didn't read the question properly)
    Originally posted by DoaM
    Presuming it was two mark question, as long as he had shown his working prowla would still get a mark by showing he'd understood what the question was asking and used the correct method, just not the extra mark for the actual correct answer
    2.22kWp Solar PV system installed Oct 2010, Fronius IG20 Inverter,
    south facing (-5 deg), 30 degree pitch, no shading

    Quidquid Latine dictum sit altum videtur
    (Revera linguam latinam vix cognovi )
Welcome to our new Forum!

Our aim is to save you money quickly and easily. We hope you like it!

Forum Team Contact us

Live Stats

3,637Posts Today

8,350Users online

Martin's Twitter
  • RT @Dora_Haf: @MartinSLewis So many people on here saying they're great until you get your PROPER job. What if Your proper job Is ON zero?

  • RT @hslt88: @MartinSLewis I?m a trustee for a youth charity. We only have a limited pool of funds for flexible youth workers for holiday sc?

  • RT @Dan_i_elle_88: @MartinSLewis Loved working zero hour agency care work. Never out of work and I loved having the flexibility! Only left?

  • Follow Martin