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  • FIRST POST
    • spencer0
    • By spencer0 14th Sep 18, 3:12 PM
    • 2Posts
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    spencer0
    Finding out when my property was built
    • #1
    • 14th Sep 18, 3:12 PM
    Finding out when my property was built 14th Sep 18 at 3:12 PM
    I am trying to organise contents insurance for my home but am having trouble finding out when my property was built. I told the insurance people that I have no idea and can't seem to find any information online, then they told me to guess but to be careful as if I am wrong by 10 years either side it could mean my policy is void! Wondering if anyone could help. Living in London in a Grade 2 listed house, I know its old but not sure how old! Thanks
Page 1
    • worried jim
    • By worried jim 14th Sep 18, 3:14 PM
    • 9,666 Posts
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    worried jim
    • #2
    • 14th Sep 18, 3:14 PM
    • #2
    • 14th Sep 18, 3:14 PM
    I thought the land registry would be the place for this.

    https://hmlandregistry.blog.gov.uk/2018/01/26/how-old-is-my-house/
    "Only two things are infinite-the universe and human stupidity, and I'm not so sure about the universe"
    Albert Einstein
    • davidmcn
    • By davidmcn 14th Sep 18, 3:15 PM
    • 9,076 Posts
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    davidmcn
    • #3
    • 14th Sep 18, 3:15 PM
    • #3
    • 14th Sep 18, 3:15 PM
    If it's listed then look up the listing - it should give a reasonably educated idea of when it was built. I wouldn't worry too much about it though - it really won't make a difference to a claim whether your house is from the 1860s or the 1880s! They're really just looking for a rough idea of the era.
    • spencer0
    • By spencer0 14th Sep 18, 3:18 PM
    • 2 Posts
    • 0 Thanks
    spencer0
    • #4
    • 14th Sep 18, 3:18 PM
    • #4
    • 14th Sep 18, 3:18 PM
    Thanks David, It's not listed, I am renting it. I don't even know what era it would be! Maybe best to speak to an estate agent
    • davidmcn
    • By davidmcn 14th Sep 18, 3:32 PM
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    davidmcn
    • #5
    • 14th Sep 18, 3:32 PM
    • #5
    • 14th Sep 18, 3:32 PM
    Living in London in a Grade 2 listed house
    Originally posted by spencer0
    It's not listed
    Originally posted by spencer0
    Eh?


    Anyway, you could also try seeing from old maps when the street was first developed, look up details of local history, or just stick a photo up here and people will chip in with their suggestions.
    • lincroft1710
    • By lincroft1710 14th Sep 18, 3:35 PM
    • 11,184 Posts
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    lincroft1710
    • #6
    • 14th Sep 18, 3:35 PM
    • #6
    • 14th Sep 18, 3:35 PM
    Why does an insurance company need to know the age of your house for contents insurance? Are properties of a certain age more likely to be burgled or catch fire? Is an 1840s built house more vulnerable than one built in the 1860s?

    Pity you can't post a photo, as we could probably give you a reasonably accurate idea
    Last edited by lincroft1710; 14-09-2018 at 3:37 PM.
    • Cakeguts
    • By Cakeguts 14th Sep 18, 3:37 PM
    • 5,232 Posts
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    Cakeguts
    • #7
    • 14th Sep 18, 3:37 PM
    • #7
    • 14th Sep 18, 3:37 PM
    Why does an insurance company need to know the age of your house for contents insurance? Are properties of a certain age more likely to be burgled or catch fire?

    Pity you can't post a photo, as we could probably give you a reasonably accurate idea
    Originally posted by lincroft1710

    This is just what I was going to ask. I would have thought that the age question would be more likely in a building's insurance policy not a contents one.
    • t0rt0ise
    • By t0rt0ise 14th Sep 18, 3:38 PM
    • 3,116 Posts
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    t0rt0ise
    • #8
    • 14th Sep 18, 3:38 PM
    • #8
    • 14th Sep 18, 3:38 PM
    You say in your first post that the house is grade II listed, so look at https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/ put in your post code and it will be there.

    Property I live in is there and it says built around 1827 - 1832. Yours should say something.
    • agrinnall
    • By agrinnall 14th Sep 18, 4:34 PM
    • 21,439 Posts
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    agrinnall
    • #9
    • 14th Sep 18, 4:34 PM
    • #9
    • 14th Sep 18, 4:34 PM
    Following on from lincroft and cakeguts' posts, what type of insurance are you trying to find? The age of the property would under must circumstances only be relevant for Buildings cover, and as a tenant you have no need to buy that. As they both point it, it shouldn't be asked for Contents cover, and if it is it would be simple to find other insurers who don't ask.
    • CarrieVS
    • By CarrieVS 14th Sep 18, 5:07 PM
    • 57 Posts
    • 101 Thanks
    CarrieVS
    It shouldn't be asked for Contents cover, and if it is it would be simple to find other insurers who don't ask.
    Originally posted by agrinnall
    In my experience (admittedly limited), it's asked for contents cover.

    I presume because if something catastrophic happens to the building, which may be more likely in old properties depending on the nature of the catastrophe (wouldn't be surprised if some older buildings had higher risk of fire, perhaps also damp, leaking roofs, the house falling down from sheer age?), it may also damage the contents.
    • Computer Beginner
    • By Computer Beginner 16th Sep 18, 6:56 PM
    • 269 Posts
    • 150 Thanks
    Computer Beginner
    Do you have the original (paper) deeds for your house?
    When you bought the house, did you get a survey done?

    The year my house was built is listed on both.

    If the original deeds are lost, what about asking your neighbours?
    • Adereterial
    • By Adereterial 16th Sep 18, 7:09 PM
    • 504 Posts
    • 684 Thanks
    Adereterial
    Iíve always been asked this question for contents only insurance.

    OP - youíre renting, ask your landlord. Alternatively sling up a picture and someone will be able to give you an educated guess based on the style.
    • Zorillo
    • By Zorillo 16th Sep 18, 8:02 PM
    • 427 Posts
    • 280 Thanks
    Zorillo
    If it's pre-world war two say 1900.

    If it's Edwardian or older say 1800.

    They're not going to void if you tell them it's older than it is.
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