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  • FIRST POST
    • The Jester
    • By The Jester 13th Sep 18, 10:06 AM
    • 183Posts
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    The Jester
    0 WOW
    Uk & Irish Passports
    • #1
    • 13th Sep 18, 10:06 AM
    0 WOW
    Uk & Irish Passports 13th Sep 18 at 10:06 AM
    I have dual UK and Irish citizenship. Iím in the process of applying for my Irish passport.

    What I wish to know is can I travel out on one passport and return with another or do I have to use the same passport for both?

    Iíve emailed various organisations but I havenít received a reply from any of them.

Page 1
    • eDicky
    • By eDicky 13th Sep 18, 2:37 PM
    • 3,809 Posts
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    eDicky
    • #2
    • 13th Sep 18, 2:37 PM
    • #2
    • 13th Sep 18, 2:37 PM
    Travel out from, and back to, where?

    When there's no visa or stamp in and out for these passports, such as within Europe, you don't need to enter and depart on the same one. But for a country that stamps you in, you need to produce the passport with that stamp on departure
    • benjus
    • By benjus 13th Sep 18, 2:57 PM
    • 5,197 Posts
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    benjus
    • #3
    • 13th Sep 18, 2:57 PM
    • #3
    • 13th Sep 18, 2:57 PM
    Also what do you mean by "return with another"?

    The passport you present to exit the country you are leaving (if the country in question has immigration exit checks) does not have to be the same as the passport you use to enter the country you are going to.
    Let's settle this like gentlemen: armed with heavy sticks
    On a rotating plate, with spikes like Flash Gordon
    And you're Peter Duncan; I gave you fair warning
    • The Jester
    • By The Jester 13th Sep 18, 4:38 PM
    • 183 Posts
    • 33 Thanks
    The Jester
    • #4
    • 13th Sep 18, 4:38 PM
    • #4
    • 13th Sep 18, 4:38 PM
    I was thinking along the lines of when we leave the EU next year.

    For example if I travelled to Spain could I leave the UK with my UK passport and enter Spain with my Irish passport? This would avoid paying a potential visa as I will be a non EU member next year using my UK passport. I would also avoid lining up as a non EU member.

    • NoodleDoodleMan
    • By NoodleDoodleMan 13th Sep 18, 4:56 PM
    • 601 Posts
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    NoodleDoodleMan
    • #5
    • 13th Sep 18, 4:56 PM
    • #5
    • 13th Sep 18, 4:56 PM
    Why would Spain introduce a visa requirement for UK passport holders after Brexit ?

    They didn't prior our membership of the EU.
    Last edited by NoodleDoodleMan; 13-09-2018 at 10:32 PM.
    • alanrowell
    • By alanrowell 13th Sep 18, 6:12 PM
    • 5,285 Posts
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    alanrowell
    • #6
    • 13th Sep 18, 6:12 PM
    • #6
    • 13th Sep 18, 6:12 PM
    Why would Spain introduce a visa requirement for UK pasport holders after Brexit ?

    They didn't prior our membership of the EU.
    Originally posted by NoodleDoodleMan
    There's the certainty of an ESTA like fee for non-EU citizens. Using an EU passport will mean they'll be able to use the EU lines and won't be subject to Schengen (if the country is part of Schengen) nor won't need a passport that is valid for at least 3 months after they go home

    As for OP - you generally enter and a leave a country on the same passport

    So you could leave the UK on your UK passport and enter an EU country on your Irish passport and vice versa.

    However as Irish citizens have the same rights as UK citizens in the UK due to the Common Travel Area you can leave and enter the UK on the Irish passport
    • jonesMUFCforever
    • By jonesMUFCforever 13th Sep 18, 10:11 PM
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    jonesMUFCforever
    • #7
    • 13th Sep 18, 10:11 PM
    • #7
    • 13th Sep 18, 10:11 PM
    If they do it for us we can do it for them - so you will have to pay one way or another.
    What goes around - comes around
    give lots and you will always receive lots
    • eDicky
    • By eDicky 14th Sep 18, 5:08 AM
    • 3,809 Posts
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    eDicky
    • #8
    • 14th Sep 18, 5:08 AM
    • #8
    • 14th Sep 18, 5:08 AM
    I was thinking along the lines of when we leave the EU next year.

    For example if I travelled to Spain could I leave the UK with my UK passport and enter Spain with my Irish passport?
    Originally posted by The Jester
    You could do that, before or after Brexit, but remember that the passport you produce when boarding a flight must match the details you gave for API (Advance Passenger Information) before checking in.

    It's possible that a mismatch will be noticed if you present a different passport on arrival, according to whether the systems are programed for this already or in future. If this occurs it would be remedied by then producing the passport you flew with.

    In any case, as Alan says, you may as well depart UK on your Irish passport for the whole trip, perhaps returning on your UK one if there turns out to be any advantage.

    I doubt that UK passport holders will be excluded from automatic e-gates at (non-Schengen) European borders, so queueing differences may not be relevant.
    you generally enter and a leave a country on the same passport
    Originally posted by alanrowell
    In principle, yes, but in practice within Europe there's no problem for dual-nationality EU citizens switching passport. After Brexit of course, as with so many things we will have to see...
    • Voyager2002
    • By Voyager2002 14th Sep 18, 8:48 AM
    • 12,358 Posts
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    Voyager2002
    • #9
    • 14th Sep 18, 8:48 AM
    • #9
    • 14th Sep 18, 8:48 AM
    If they do it for us we can do it for them - so you will have to pay one way or another.
    Originally posted by jonesMUFCforever
    The agreement on a Common Travel Area between Britain and Ireland has nothing to do with the EU. We can be confident that Irish passport holders will continue to be allowed to enter the UK without fees.
    • thrifty_pete
    • By thrifty_pete 14th Sep 18, 9:52 AM
    • 235 Posts
    • 50 Thanks
    thrifty_pete
    won't be subject to Schengen (if the country is part of Schengen)
    Originally posted by alanrowell
    The passport you hold is irrelevant to passport controls for Schengen - you are either travelling within Schengen (i.e. between two Schengen members like Italy and Austria) in which case there is no passport control at all, or you travelling from outside Schengen (e.g. UK) to within it (e.g. Spain) or vice versa where there is passport control.
    Airports in Schengen countries have different gates for Schengen and non-Schengen flights. The latter funnel you through passport control, the former don't.
    So there will be no difference to today.
    Last edited by thrifty_pete; 14-09-2018 at 9:54 AM.
    • eDicky
    • By eDicky 14th Sep 18, 2:14 PM
    • 3,809 Posts
    • 1,982 Thanks
    eDicky
    The passport you hold is irrelevant to passport controls for Schengen - you are either travelling within Schengen (i.e. between two Schengen members like Italy and Austria) in which case there is no passport control at all, or you travelling from outside Schengen (e.g. UK) to within it (e.g. Spain) or vice versa where there is passport control.
    Airports in Schengen countries have different gates for Schengen and non-Schengen flights. The latter funnel you through passport control, the former don't.
    So there will be no difference to today.
    Originally posted by thrifty_pete
    Arrivals at EU airports from any non-Schengen country usually find there are different queues at border control, for EU/EEA nationals and for other countries, the latter involving questions about duration and purpose of visit etc, and taking more time if there's volume.

    The harder the Brexit that we have to suffer, the more likely it is that Brits will be joining that 'others' queue. However for the common holiday destinations it may not make much difference, and the increasing prevalence of e-gates are likely to be usable even if directed to a desk for a stamp after passing through.
    • NoodleDoodleMan
    • By NoodleDoodleMan 14th Sep 18, 5:20 PM
    • 601 Posts
    • 191 Thanks
    NoodleDoodleMan
    So there will be no difference to today.
    Are you sure ?

    Simon Calder appears to be telling a different story.

    https://www.independent.co.uk/travel/news-and-advice/etias-brexit-schengen-area-british-passports-online-visa-a7879876.html
    • jonesMUFCforever
    • By jonesMUFCforever 15th Sep 18, 12:30 AM
    • 25,183 Posts
    • 12,435 Thanks
    jonesMUFCforever
    The agreement on a Common Travel Area between Britain and Ireland has nothing to do with the EU. We can be confident that Irish passport holders will continue to be allowed to enter the UK without fees.
    Originally posted by Voyager2002
    Post 4 indicated that he was thinking of going to Spain.
    What goes around - comes around
    give lots and you will always receive lots
    • mynameisclare
    • By mynameisclare 15th Sep 18, 9:34 PM
    • 244 Posts
    • 277 Thanks
    mynameisclare
    There is some useful information here about how to travel using dual passports in general: https://travel.stackexchange.com/questions/52100/i-have-two-passports-nationalities-how-do-i-use-them-when-i-travel


    Of course in this case you *should* be able to just use the Irish one as others said, but looking at what happened to the Windrush people I don't know if I would trust that any more. I'd want to make sure I had my UK one just in case.
    • MysteryMe
    • By MysteryMe 15th Sep 18, 10:01 PM
    • 1,955 Posts
    • 2,349 Thanks
    MysteryMe
    The arrangements between Ireland and Britain have nothing to do with "Windrush people" nor Brexit.
    • DavidUriach
    • By DavidUriach 21st Sep 18, 11:58 AM
    • 1 Posts
    • 0 Thanks
    DavidUriach
    Hello! I had the same question when I got my Cyprus passport through investment through Tranio)))) was confused and wrote to many different organizations because I wanted to fly out from London with my UK one and come back through France but with a new one... Apparently you can't do that, if you left with one you have to return with the same one in the system. I don't know if the same rule applies to Irish but I guess yes.
    • shaun from Africa
    • By shaun from Africa 21st Sep 18, 12:21 PM
    • 10,288 Posts
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    shaun from Africa
    Apparently you can't do that, if you left with one you have to return with the same one in the system. I don't know if the same rule applies to Irish but I guess yes.
    Originally posted by DavidUriach
    That's sort of correct but not totally.

    When flying internationally you have to have your passport details registered with your airline and the registered passport must match the one you present when you check in or have you passport examined prior to boarding.
    However, there is nothing to stop you flying out on your UK passport then once you are at your destination, changing the details on your booking to show the other passport. (this probably wouldn't be allowed for countries where you are travelling in on a visa or visa waiver).

    I had to do this on BA when the passport I left the UK on (my UK passport) was submitted for a visa overseas and it didn't arrive back with me before I had to leave the country so I travelled back on my Irish passport.

    Provided that your non UK passport gives you unfettered right of entry into the whatever countries you travel into then the passport that you use for travel with an airline doesn't always have to be the same one that you show to immigration when you get to your destination.
    You could check in at the airport with your Cypriot passport then provided that your other passport allows you entry into the country that you are flying to, present that 2nd passport to immigration.
    It might cause a few delays and get you questioned as to why you are doing it but provided you have a valid reason, there is nothing illegal in doing so.
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