Your browser isn't supported
It looks like you're using an old web browser. To get the most out of the site and to ensure guides display correctly, we suggest upgrading your browser now. Download the latest:

Welcome to the MSE Forums

We're home to a fantastic community of MoneySavers but anyone can post. Please exercise caution & report spam, illegal, offensive or libellous posts/messages: click "report" or email forumteam@.

Search
  • FIRST POST
    • mardatha
    • By mardatha 10th Sep 18, 1:19 PM
    • 15,283Posts
    • 148,502Thanks
    mardatha
    Next Year Veg Plot Prep?
    • #1
    • 10th Sep 18, 1:19 PM
    Next Year Veg Plot Prep? 10th Sep 18 at 1:19 PM
    After fabulous potatoes and onions this year, the husband has finally agreed to enlarge the veg growing section of the back garden. Is there anything we should or could do now to prep the ground, to make it easier next Spring? The weather up here in springtime is usually dire
Page 1
    • Linda32
    • By Linda32 10th Sep 18, 5:31 PM
    • 4,232 Posts
    • 9,311 Thanks
    Linda32
    • #2
    • 10th Sep 18, 5:31 PM
    • #2
    • 10th Sep 18, 5:31 PM
    Depending on how cold it is where you are you could sow green manure. Have a Google.

    Or spread manure on your beds, no need to dig it in, just leave.

    You could also turn over the soil, roughly dug, if it stays in clods and let the frost do it's work.
    • mardatha
    • By mardatha 10th Sep 18, 8:58 PM
    • 15,283 Posts
    • 148,502 Thanks
    mardatha
    • #3
    • 10th Sep 18, 8:58 PM
    • #3
    • 10th Sep 18, 8:58 PM
    Don't think green manure will do up here, but think maybe turn it over and try and break it up a wee bit, then maybe put some manure on it later on. TY Linda!
    • Linda32
    • By Linda32 10th Sep 18, 10:42 PM
    • 4,232 Posts
    • 9,311 Thanks
    Linda32
    • #4
    • 10th Sep 18, 10:42 PM
    • #4
    • 10th Sep 18, 10:42 PM
    I did wonder whether it would take. Up on the hill in Scotland, I'm guessing is a little late in the year to be sowing

    However, certainly turning over will certainly work and let the frost do the work.
    • mardatha
    • By mardatha 11th Sep 18, 8:26 PM
    • 15,283 Posts
    • 148,502 Thanks
    mardatha
    • #5
    • 11th Sep 18, 8:26 PM
    • #5
    • 11th Sep 18, 8:26 PM
    Meant to do this today but it was very windy and only 12c so we left it for a better day.
    • Apodemus
    • By Apodemus 12th Sep 18, 6:14 PM
    • 1,136 Posts
    • 941 Thanks
    Apodemus
    • #6
    • 12th Sep 18, 6:14 PM
    • #6
    • 12th Sep 18, 6:14 PM
    ... only 12c so we left it for a better day.
    Originally posted by mardatha
    So that will be next June, then?
    • mardatha
    • By mardatha 13th Sep 18, 1:21 PM
    • 15,283 Posts
    • 148,502 Thanks
    mardatha
    • #7
    • 13th Sep 18, 1:21 PM
    • #7
    • 13th Sep 18, 1:21 PM
    if not July!
    • -taff
    • By -taff 14th Sep 18, 1:12 PM
    • 8,687 Posts
    • 7,948 Thanks
    -taff
    • #8
    • 14th Sep 18, 1:12 PM
    • #8
    • 14th Sep 18, 1:12 PM
    Have you thought about no dig? Works very well if you can find enough stuff to put on the soil every year...Google charles dowding
    • mardatha
    • By mardatha 14th Sep 18, 9:11 PM
    • 15,283 Posts
    • 148,502 Thanks
    mardatha
    • #9
    • 14th Sep 18, 9:11 PM
    • #9
    • 14th Sep 18, 9:11 PM
    Husband doesnt like it - says it looks terrible, like a land-fill. He's the one who digs so I'm not fussy taff
    • Primrose
    • By Primrose 17th Sep 18, 8:11 PM
    • 8,404 Posts
    • 29,530 Thanks
    Primrose
    The other thing you can be doing is perhaps consider building a bigger compost heap somewhere. With a bigger growing area you will probably find you can never provide enough compost to dig in.

    And sign up for some seed catalogues. When the rain is lashing down the windows in winter there,s nothing more pleasant than browsing through them looking for new varieties of vegetables to grow. But if you're expanding your growing range, use this opportunity to search out hardier varieties that may be better suited to your local climate.

    Leeks and kale are pretty hardy.....if you like them !
    • mardatha
    • By mardatha 20th Sep 18, 7:41 AM
    • 15,283 Posts
    • 148,502 Thanks
    mardatha
    I hate kale lol but I do grow some for soup. Have grown leeks yes, and onions. We still haven't tackled that section yet, waiting for a nice still bright autumn day.
    • -taff
    • By -taff 20th Sep 18, 8:40 AM
    • 8,687 Posts
    • 7,948 Thanks
    -taff
    If you like garlic, you can sow that now , it's very hungry though so lots of feed [ manure of any kind will do it]. You could also sow borad beans if you like, they will grow a little bit, then stop over the winter, then start again in spring. They're quite hardy but I'm not sure how cold it'll get with you, so maybe check bottom end frost proofness
    • mardatha
    • By mardatha 24th Sep 18, 7:13 AM
    • 15,283 Posts
    • 148,502 Thanks
    mardatha
    It gets cold. Lowest we've had was minus 19. I not keen on beans though.. Husband has strimmed the weeds in the veg bit and we've had a few morning frosts so the chickweed won't come back at least. Not got round to digging yet, I've got a rotator cuff tear and it's tiring trying to do stuff with one arm, plus I'm tired anyway. I wish we could afford a gardener!
    Thank you taff xx.
Welcome to our new Forum!

Our aim is to save you money quickly and easily. We hope you like it!

Forum Team Contact us

Live Stats

110Posts Today

1,990Users online

Martin's Twitter
  • "Sabrina, you're young. I'm not sure you've the experience I'm looking for in a business partner." Eh? Isn't the pr? https://t.co/IeTxBQq2OU

  • I am predicting the word myself will be misused 6 times in today;s boardroom. What do yourself think? #TheApprentice

  • Not sure how I ever succeeded running a successful entreprise? After all my gardening and garden design skills are? https://t.co/FFnvkjsGDU

  • Follow Martin