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  • FIRST POST
    • kazzyb123
    • By kazzyb123 3rd Sep 18, 1:33 AM
    • 12Posts
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    kazzyb123
    Damp proofing under stairs cupboard Victorian terraced house
    • #1
    • 3rd Sep 18, 1:33 AM
    Damp proofing under stairs cupboard Victorian terraced house 3rd Sep 18 at 1:33 AM
    Hi, Iím looking for advice please. We have an under stairs cupboard in a typical two up two down terrace. The floor isnít level with the downstairs floor, there are three steps down because of when the cellar was filled in.
    It is painted brick and damp. The damp is moving up the cupboard walls and coming through into the two rooms either side of the cupboard and also at the bottom of the stairs and either side of the stairs
    We have used a membrane where this is happening outside the cupboard but donít know how to deal with the inside of the cupboard because some of it is below ground level (40cm). Would a membrane on the walls and floor work followed by installing a laminate floor or false floor and boarding then plastering the walls?
    Would we also need to used an injected dpc or damp rods at floor level to stop the spread up the stairs?

    Hope I explained that clearly,
    Thanks
Page 1
    • kazzyb123
    • By kazzyb123 13th Sep 18, 6:28 PM
    • 12 Posts
    • 7 Thanks
    kazzyb123
    • #2
    • 13th Sep 18, 6:28 PM
    • #2
    • 13th Sep 18, 6:28 PM
    Anyone???????
    • FreeBear
    • By FreeBear 13th Sep 18, 11:57 PM
    • 2,095 Posts
    • 2,938 Thanks
    FreeBear
    • #3
    • 13th Sep 18, 11:57 PM
    • #3
    • 13th Sep 18, 11:57 PM
    Why was the cellar filled in ?

    Are there any airbricks to ventilate the void under the floorboards ?
    Her courage will change the world.

    Treasure the moments that you have. Savour them for as long as you can for they will never come back again.
    • armchaireconomist
    • By armchaireconomist 14th Sep 18, 9:47 AM
    • 341 Posts
    • 417 Thanks
    armchaireconomist
    • #4
    • 14th Sep 18, 9:47 AM
    • #4
    • 14th Sep 18, 9:47 AM
    Bring the floor up to the level with the rest of the house, tank the walls and ensure adequate ventilation
    • FreeBear
    • By FreeBear 14th Sep 18, 12:58 PM
    • 2,095 Posts
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    FreeBear
    • #5
    • 14th Sep 18, 12:58 PM
    • #5
    • 14th Sep 18, 12:58 PM
    Bring the floor up to the level with the rest of the house, tank the walls and ensure adequate ventilation
    Originally posted by armchaireconomist
    Victorian house, (probably) solid brick walls, the internal ones are likely to be single brick thickness. Tanking the walls will just mask the problem and push the damp further up the wall.
    Her courage will change the world.

    Treasure the moments that you have. Savour them for as long as you can for they will never come back again.
    • the_lunatic_is_in_my_head
    • By the_lunatic_is_in_my_head 14th Sep 18, 1:22 PM
    • 2,208 Posts
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    the_lunatic_is_in_my_head
    • #6
    • 14th Sep 18, 1:22 PM
    • #6
    • 14th Sep 18, 1:22 PM
    Victorian house, (probably) solid brick walls, the internal ones are likely to be single brick thickness. Tanking the walls will just mask the problem and push the damp further up the wall.
    Originally posted by FreeBear
    I don't mean to hijack the OPs thread but we are looking at something similar.

    We have stairs with a landing and 2 solid stone walls to insulate (one external, the other is sort of external, one side is the bit under the stairs, the other side is under the living room floor which is filled with rubble).

    I was going to attach 2x1 to each wall and then cover with a breatherable membrane but wasn't sure on which insulation to use.

    Upstairs we've used Thermafleece but the downstairs of the house is hard to heat and a little damp (simply due to the lack of heating, little ventilation under the stairs and the high humidity where we live).

    If there a particular insulation which would be suited that is easily accessible to purchase?

    I've read about these hemp boards but can't seem to find anywhere online selling them.
    • bxboards
    • By bxboards 14th Sep 18, 1:44 PM
    • 1,611 Posts
    • 1,260 Thanks
    bxboards
    • #7
    • 14th Sep 18, 1:44 PM
    • #7
    • 14th Sep 18, 1:44 PM
    I really would not bother with injecting anything.

    There maybe some merit in thinking about some sort of cellar membrane (ie Newton, Platon P8 etc), generally its always best to find the source, but on some occasions it's not possible.

    I've renovated a 1780-ish cottage with rubble stone walls with soggy infill, sadly also cement rendered externally. Platon behind studwork with about 2 inches of insulation is about the only thing that worked in that house. Professional installed slurry tanking (not installed by me) failed after about 3 months, although at the time when they were doing it, I had no idea that instaling dot and dab plasterboard direct to the tanking was a bad idea....


    But it's always best to try to figure out the source.
    • FreeBear
    • By FreeBear 14th Sep 18, 2:16 PM
    • 2,095 Posts
    • 2,938 Thanks
    FreeBear
    • #8
    • 14th Sep 18, 2:16 PM
    • #8
    • 14th Sep 18, 2:16 PM
    If there a particular insulation which would be suited that is easily accessible to purchase?
    Originally posted by the_lunatic_is_in_my_head
    I would suggest looking at either Pavatex or cork boards topped off with Savolit woodwool boards. A finish of lime plaster would then be applied and be in keeping with the rest of the property.

    Ensure that the battens have a DPC where they make contact with the wall, and leave some ventilation for the void.

    Have a chat with someone like Mike Wye, and they will be able to advise on suitable materials. That said, they might suggest hemp plaster, but based on comments from a work colleague that used the stuff, she was less than impressed.
    Her courage will change the world.

    Treasure the moments that you have. Savour them for as long as you can for they will never come back again.
    • jk0
    • By jk0 14th Sep 18, 3:43 PM
    • 2,528 Posts
    • 25,636 Thanks
    jk0
    • #9
    • 14th Sep 18, 3:43 PM
    • #9
    • 14th Sep 18, 3:43 PM
    I'd remove whatever is filling the cellar, and then you'll have a clear air path to air bricks at front & back of house.
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