Your browser isn't supported
It looks like you're using an old web browser. To get the most out of the site and to ensure guides display correctly, we suggest upgrading your browser now. Download the latest:

Welcome to the MSE Forums

We're home to a fantastic community of MoneySavers but anyone can post. Please exercise caution & report spam, illegal, offensive or libellous posts/messages: click "report" or email forumteam@. Skimlinks & other affiliated links are turned on

Search
  • FIRST POST
    • NewShadow
    • By NewShadow 11th Aug 18, 6:31 AM
    • 3,280Posts
    • 14,232Thanks
    NewShadow
    Installing stove - ballpark to budget
    • #1
    • 11th Aug 18, 6:31 AM
    Installing stove - ballpark to budget 11th Aug 18 at 6:31 AM
    Morning All,

    If I were to want to install a wood burning stove into a house where there had been a chimney which had either been blocked up (and has a vent at floor level) or has had a gas fire installed...

    What are the factors I should be thinking about with regards ease of install/budgeting?

    ATM I'm assuming 1k for the stove and 1k for opening up and lining the chimney - sound about right?

    It wouldn't be for the main heat source so wouldn't need to be a huge/hot thing as the house would have GCH - but I would want to be able to put a whistling kettle on top

    Only asking as it could be a tie breaker when I'm looking at houses to buy...
    That sounds like a classic case of premature extrapolation.

    House deposit: 26% = 26,000 + 800pm * 9 months = 33,000

    Goal: Keep the bigger picture in mind...
Page 1
    • dancing_star
    • By dancing_star 11th Aug 18, 7:35 AM
    • 197 Posts
    • 346 Thanks
    dancing_star
    • #2
    • 11th Aug 18, 7:35 AM
    • #2
    • 11th Aug 18, 7:35 AM
    I think that is a ballpark figure, possibly a little on the low side for opening/lining:


    I got one done earlier this year.



    My chimney had been blocked up, but I got it opened out by the builders who did a lot of other work for me.


    I paid a separate installer to do the woodburner - I ordered it separately, and he provided the liner and did the installation, and stuck a thingy on top of the chimney to stop stuff falling in.



    Woodburner cost 750 ish, got a discount as it was a friend of a friend. The installation including liner, cost 2k. . But it's only a 4.8k burner, which doesn't need the external venty thing. Similar to your requirements, it's not my main source of heat and it's in a small room.



    The builder's invoice didn't split out how much the chimney knock out cost. So if you need that doing I'd factor that in too.



    I'm in Yorkshire, and prices may differ in your area
    • NewShadow
    • By NewShadow 11th Aug 18, 10:16 AM
    • 3,280 Posts
    • 14,232 Thanks
    NewShadow
    • #3
    • 11th Aug 18, 10:16 AM
    • #3
    • 11th Aug 18, 10:16 AM
    Thanks

    Do you think it would make a significant difference if they have to remove an electric/gas fire rather than open up something that had just been closed off? Thinking that would have to be a qualified gas safe person?

    Also - any idea if you could have one on the ground and second story on the same wall?

    Silly to be designing a house before I've even started viewings but I want to make sure I'm informed enough to see the possibilities and limitations of the space I'm looking at
    That sounds like a classic case of premature extrapolation.

    House deposit: 26% = 26,000 + 800pm * 9 months = 33,000

    Goal: Keep the bigger picture in mind...
    • dancing_star
    • By dancing_star 11th Aug 18, 10:54 AM
    • 197 Posts
    • 346 Thanks
    dancing_star
    • #4
    • 11th Aug 18, 10:54 AM
    • #4
    • 11th Aug 18, 10:54 AM
    Thanks

    Do you think it would make a significant difference if they have to remove an electric/gas fire rather than open up something that had just been closed off? Thinking that would have to be a qualified gas safe person?
    Originally posted by NewShadow

    Not sure, but don't think it would make too much of a difference. Mine had been completely blocked up so nothing in there to get rid of.





    Also - any idea if you could have one on the ground and second story on the same wall?
    Don't quote me on this but I don't see how that could work in the same chimney flue. My house has adjacent flues/chimneys, so the fireplace on the second floor is offset in the chimney breast if that makes any sense. I only had the burner installed downstairs. I had the hearth opened up upstairs, but just a blank space inside which I had grand ideas of artistically filling with objects, haven't got round to it yet.


    Same on the other side of the house, two flues separately for upstairs and downstairs fireplaces.


    I'm sorry I am not a builder so may have used wrong terminology above!
    • Davesnave
    • By Davesnave 11th Aug 18, 12:05 PM
    • 26,387 Posts
    • 95,436 Thanks
    Davesnave
    • #5
    • 11th Aug 18, 12:05 PM
    • #5
    • 11th Aug 18, 12:05 PM
    Thanks

    Also - any idea if you could have one on the ground and second story on the same wall?
    Originally posted by NewShadow
    It ought to be possible, as the flues shouldn't be linked, but unless it's an 'upside down' house on a slope, with an upper entrance at a higher ground level, you'd be carrying logs upstairs; hardly 21st century living!
    A garden is never so good as it will be next year....
    • NewShadow
    • By NewShadow 11th Aug 18, 1:29 PM
    • 3,280 Posts
    • 14,232 Thanks
    NewShadow
    • #6
    • 11th Aug 18, 1:29 PM
    • #6
    • 11th Aug 18, 1:29 PM
    It ought to be possible, as the flues shouldn't be linked, but unless it's an 'upside down' house on a slope, with an upper entrance at a higher ground level, you'd be carrying logs upstairs; hardly 21st century living!
    Originally posted by Davesnave
    Saves on the gym
    That sounds like a classic case of premature extrapolation.

    House deposit: 26% = 26,000 + 800pm * 9 months = 33,000

    Goal: Keep the bigger picture in mind...
    • FreeBear
    • By FreeBear 11th Aug 18, 4:04 PM
    • 1,980 Posts
    • 2,818 Thanks
    FreeBear
    • #7
    • 11th Aug 18, 4:04 PM
    • #7
    • 11th Aug 18, 4:04 PM
    ATM I'm assuming 1k for the stove and 1k for opening up and lining the chimney - sound about right?
    Originally posted by NewShadow
    Depends on the style of stove - If you go for a "designer" or contemporary model, 3K to 25K+. Fitting may well cost you 1500 depending on how much of the preparatory grunt work you're willing to do. If the arch needs replacing, add a bit more.

    Avoid using gypsum plaster & ordinary plasterboard anywhere near the stove - The heat will cause it to crack like crazy and fall off. Plasterboard isn't rated as being non-combustable, so shouldn't be used anyway. Lime plaster and High Alumina Cement renders are suitable if you didn't want bare brick.

    Also - any idea if you could have one on the ground and second story on the same wall?
    Originally posted by NewShadow
    As long as the flues are separate, it is possible, but... Pretty sure you can not have a fire in a room used for sleeping, so you will need to check this before thinking about it.
    Her courage will change the world.

    Treasure the moments that you have. Savour them for as long as you can for they will never come back again.
    • Gloomendoom
    • By Gloomendoom 11th Aug 18, 6:05 PM
    • 14,889 Posts
    • 20,238 Thanks
    Gloomendoom
    • #8
    • 11th Aug 18, 6:05 PM
    • #8
    • 11th Aug 18, 6:05 PM
    We have a fireplace in our bedroom. It's not unusual in older houses.

    OP, why would you want a solid fuel stove in a bedroom if you have gas central heating?
    Never argue with stupid people, they will drag you down to their level and then beat you with experience. - Mark Twain
    • theonlywayisup
    • By theonlywayisup 11th Aug 18, 6:28 PM
    • 12,688 Posts
    • 8,586 Thanks
    theonlywayisup
    • #9
    • 11th Aug 18, 6:28 PM
    • #9
    • 11th Aug 18, 6:28 PM
    We have a fireplace in our bedroom. It's not unusual in older houses.

    OP, why would you want a solid fuel stove in a bedroom if you have gas central heating?
    Originally posted by Gloomendoom
    Unless I missed it I cannot see where the OP wants it in his/her bedroom...

    .....but even if they did...

    Ours was 6k, but we have an outside chimney (by that I mean the silver pipe thing that goes from ground to roof). The fire was 1500ish and the wall is 4ft thick, these were included in the 6k.
    • FreeBear
    • By FreeBear 11th Aug 18, 7:54 PM
    • 1,980 Posts
    • 2,818 Thanks
    FreeBear
    We have a fireplace in our bedroom. It's not unusual in older houses.
    Originally posted by Gloomendoom
    True - I have the remains of a fireplace in two bedrooms. Under current regulations, I don't think fitting of stoves in a bedroom is allowed any more (although I'm open to being corrected).

    Unless I missed it I cannot see where the OP wants it in his/her bedroom...
    Originally posted by theonlywayisup
    In post #3, there was a question regarding a stove on the second floor - Bedrooms are normally at that level, hence the assumption. Although it could be a maisonette or flat, in which case the freeholder would probably need to be involved (another can of worms).
    Her courage will change the world.

    Treasure the moments that you have. Savour them for as long as you can for they will never come back again.
    • NewShadow
    • By NewShadow 11th Aug 18, 8:16 PM
    • 3,280 Posts
    • 14,232 Thanks
    NewShadow
    We have a fireplace in our bedroom. It's not unusual in older houses.

    OP, why would you want a solid fuel stove in a bedroom if you have gas central heating?
    Originally posted by Gloomendoom
    I don't own the house yet - haven't even started viewings on likely properties - so it's about knowing what I could potentially do with a space when I start viewings.

    As for why - two reasons really:

    1. I grew up in a converted cowshed that didn't have GCH so I'm used to the idea of solid fuel and find it comforting/homely. I just like the idea... I wouldn't want it instead of GCH, but I see no harm in as well as

    2. I've rented with GCH for about 10 years now and for three of those years I've been without heat/hot water for at least 3/4 days while waiting on an engineer to fix/replace a part.

    I'd really like to avoid having to use oil filled radiators again if possible so like the flexibility of being able to have one room downstairs and one upstairs where I can heat the space, make hotter bottles and food/water without having to rely on 'technology' working.

    This year it was 10 days during the worst cold snap (typically) while he tested all of the sensors then waited for a new pcb...

    It wouldn't have to be a bedroom - I'll be looking at 2/3 bed places as they're most common/affordable in my target area and I'm single without kids so it could be an upstairs office - but I would want the flexibility to sleep in there on an ad hoc basis.

    I was mostly thinking about options given a ground floor flue would go through the second story anyway and I assume that if I'm lining the chimney then it wouldn't be a straight double the cost to do a second install at the same time.

    My 'nice to have list' in no particular order includes:

    - Somewhere to dry clothes that isn't the middle of the lounge
    - Accessible storage for things like coats/hoover
    - A 'real' solid/multi fuel fire or a chimney which can convert back
    - Space for a full size fridge/freezer in the kitchen or undercounted and freezer in garage/wet room
    - Wet room for washing machine/drying
    - Space for a dishwasher
    - Porch/sunroom and/or space to build an external cat run
    - Space for one or two raised beds in the garden then the rest gravel or concrete

    Most of that would be for me to put in/arrange after purchase but the property has to have the flexibility for me to make the changes in the first place so I need to consider which are most realistic/affordable.
    Last edited by NewShadow; 11-08-2018 at 8:25 PM.
    That sounds like a classic case of premature extrapolation.

    House deposit: 26% = 26,000 + 800pm * 9 months = 33,000

    Goal: Keep the bigger picture in mind...
    • FreeBear
    • By FreeBear 11th Aug 18, 10:59 PM
    • 1,980 Posts
    • 2,818 Thanks
    FreeBear
    I was mostly thinking about options given a ground floor flue would go through the second story anyway and I assume that if I'm lining the chimney then it wouldn't be a straight double the cost to do a second install at the same time.
    Originally posted by NewShadow
    I've found with my stove, the chimney breast upstairs that has the flue running through it gets quite warm. Measuring the wall temperature with one of those noncontact thermometers shows it is around 25C - Enough to take the chill off in the bedroom.

    If you are really concerned about not having heating in the event of a GCH failure, have a look for a stove with a back boiler. A couple of small radiators upstairs running as a gravity fed system would provide ample heat. Alternatively, a heat recovery system around the flue may provide the heat you desire.. An electric shower & kettle fulfills the need for hot water when all else fails.

    I did consider a Stovax Riva inset stove when planning my installation - Some models have an option for ducting hot air to other rooms. In the end, the stove I fitted didn't have this option, but I found it kept both the main room and the bedroom above warm even during the cold weeks we had earlier in the year. Barely used the GCH at all over winter.
    Her courage will change the world.

    Treasure the moments that you have. Savour them for as long as you can for they will never come back again.
    • dancing_star
    • By dancing_star 12th Aug 18, 7:01 AM
    • 197 Posts
    • 346 Thanks
    dancing_star
    I was mostly thinking about options given a ground floor flue would go through the second story anyway and I assume that if I'm lining the chimney then it wouldn't be a straight double the cost to do a second install at the same time.
    Originally posted by NewShadow

    But you'd be lining two flues as the downstairs and upstairs fireplace flues will be separate from one another - side by side
    • NewShadow
    • By NewShadow 12th Aug 18, 10:53 AM
    • 3,280 Posts
    • 14,232 Thanks
    NewShadow
    But you'd be lining two flues as the downstairs and upstairs fireplace flues will be separate from one another - side by side
    Originally posted by dancing_star
    See... Now this is why I love MSE...

    I assumed, foolishly I guess, that because the stove has a long tube - excuse the technical language - which runs up the flue, you could break into the breast upstairs to run a second tube next to it - and just have the two running in parallel.

    When you compare the width of the stove pipe with the chimney breast it looks like there should be plenty of space:

    That sounds like a classic case of premature extrapolation.

    House deposit: 26% = 26,000 + 800pm * 9 months = 33,000

    Goal: Keep the bigger picture in mind...
Welcome to our new Forum!

Our aim is to save you money quickly and easily. We hope you like it!

Forum Team Contact us

Live Stats

2,307Posts Today

8,822Users online

Martin's Twitter