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  • FIRST POST
    • justaquestion
    • By justaquestion 9th Aug 18, 5:28 PM
    • 582Posts
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    justaquestion
    Anything to clear small fat berg in U bend of Kitchen waste?
    • #1
    • 9th Aug 18, 5:28 PM
    Anything to clear small fat berg in U bend of Kitchen waste? 9th Aug 18 at 5:28 PM
    Hi folks,

    The waste pipe from the kitchen sink has a U bend on outside wall, good sized pipe etc, but every now and then I have to clean it out as there is a build up of fat, though I am very careful to dump as much into bin.

    Its a really horrible smelly job lifting some of the fat out with a empty baked beans tin, sore on the clothes as well, I have to dump them.

    Just wondering is there any liquid solution or easier way that wouldn't damage the pipe in the process.

    Thanks a lot.
Page 1
    • EssexExile
    • By EssexExile 9th Aug 18, 5:35 PM
    • 3,284 Posts
    • 2,333 Thanks
    EssexExile
    • #2
    • 9th Aug 18, 5:35 PM
    • #2
    • 9th Aug 18, 5:35 PM
    Don't pour fat down the sink, you're just asking for trouble. If it gets blocked under the sink then it takes a few minutes to clear, when it gets blocked under your drive it's a whole bigger & more expensive problem.
    Tall, dark & handsome. Well two out of three ain't bad.
    • robin58
    • By robin58 9th Aug 18, 6:02 PM
    • 2,705 Posts
    • 3,263 Thanks
    robin58
    • #3
    • 9th Aug 18, 6:02 PM
    • #3
    • 9th Aug 18, 6:02 PM
    Yep, pour the fat in the tin BEFORE you throw the waste water down the sink, then put the tin in the general rubbish.

    EssexExile is correct about the future possibility of a blocked drain underground. Seem some in my time. Take it from me it will block when most don't need it and it will be expensive to clear.
    Last edited by robin58; 09-08-2018 at 6:19 PM.
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    The more I learn, the more I grow.
    The more I grow, the more I see.
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    The more I know, the more I see,
    How little I know.!!
    • that
    • By that 9th Aug 18, 7:05 PM
    • 763 Posts
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    that
    • #4
    • 9th Aug 18, 7:05 PM
    • #4
    • 9th Aug 18, 7:05 PM
    For blocked organic waste in drain or pipes use Hydrogen Peroxide. I use the 35% one and it is fairly expensive. It will not eat metal, but he reaction may overheat the plastic pipe so pour it slowly. It dissolves things that acid or bleach will not touch. It can create foam/bubbles, so make the contents has room to expand

    Dont get it in your eyes or hands or breathe in the fumes. Have a big bucket of water as a standby and an accessible shower/ pre-filled water bath if you are the clumsy type.

    The stronger stuff is used for rocket fuel - you won't get hold of this. Chemist often sell the 3%-12% one used for wounds or bleaching hair and teeth. The 35% and less is used in the food industry, especially poultry.

    Ebay. Cheaper than a plumber and much more fun.
    • robin58
    • By robin58 9th Aug 18, 11:46 PM
    • 2,705 Posts
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    robin58
    • #5
    • 9th Aug 18, 11:46 PM
    • #5
    • 9th Aug 18, 11:46 PM
    For blocked organic waste in drain or pipes use Hydrogen Peroxide. I use the 35% one and it is fairly expensive. It will not eat metal, but he reaction may overheat the plastic pipe so pour it slowly. It dissolves things that acid or bleach will not touch. It can create foam/bubbles, so make the contents has room to expand

    Dont get it in your eyes or hands or breathe in the fumes. Have a big bucket of water as a standby and an accessible shower/ pre-filled water bath if you are the clumsy type.

    The stronger stuff is used for rocket fuel - you won't get hold of this. Chemist often sell the 3%-12% one used for wounds or bleaching hair and teeth. The 35% and less is used in the food industry, especially poultry.

    Ebay. Cheaper than a plumber and much more fun.
    Originally posted by that

    This is a bit of a nuclear option which I would not recommend for the OP. It's too bloody dangerous for a beginner who doesn't know what they are doing with the stuff.

    Best course of action is not to put the fat down the sink in the first place. Then there will not be a problem.
    The more I live, the more I learn.
    The more I learn, the more I grow.
    The more I grow, the more I see.
    The more I see, the more I know.
    The more I know, the more I see,
    How little I know.!!
    • that
    • By that 10th Aug 18, 5:27 AM
    • 763 Posts
    • 422 Thanks
    that
    • #6
    • 10th Aug 18, 5:27 AM
    • #6
    • 10th Aug 18, 5:27 AM
    This is a bit of a nuclear option which I would not recommend for the OP. It's too bloody dangerous for a beginner who doesn't know what they are doing with the stuff.
    Originally posted by robin58
    I would say it is safer than using One-Shot, or another strong acid, kinder on the pipes, and better for the drainage system, and environmentally friendly. This is the industries answer to fatty floaters in food processing environments

    Best course of action is not to put the fat down the sink in the first place. Then there will not be a problem.
    From the post title, this ship has already sailed. Yes, they should refrain from doing it further.
    Last edited by that; 10-08-2018 at 5:30 AM.
    • Norman Castle
    • By Norman Castle 10th Aug 18, 7:15 AM
    • 7,690 Posts
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    Norman Castle
    • #7
    • 10th Aug 18, 7:15 AM
    • #7
    • 10th Aug 18, 7:15 AM
    http://www.dri-pak.co.uk/cleaning-plug-holes-and-drains/
    Don't harass a hippie. You'll get bad karma.

    Never trust a newbie with a rtb tale.
    • Brookside88
    • By Brookside88 10th Aug 18, 7:20 AM
    • 298 Posts
    • 385 Thanks
    Brookside88
    • #8
    • 10th Aug 18, 7:20 AM
    • #8
    • 10th Aug 18, 7:20 AM
    This is a bit of a nuclear option which I would not recommend for the OP. It's too bloody dangerous for a beginner who doesn't know what they are doing with the stuff.

    Best course of action is not to put the fat down the sink in the first place. Then there will not be a problem.
    Originally posted by robin58
    Hairdressers get 40% hydrogen peroxide on their hands on a daily basis (from experience) it's really not as bad as this
    Barclaycard CC 5,912.12/0___Virgin CC 5,536.81/5,536.81___Zopa Loan 5,680.83/4,906.17___Tesco CC 1,922.46/1,772.46___MBNA CC 6,323.15/5,696.73
    Total 19,838.56/17,912.17 (9.7%)
    • Gloomendoom
    • By Gloomendoom 10th Aug 18, 8:49 AM
    • 15,321 Posts
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    Gloomendoom
    • #9
    • 10th Aug 18, 8:49 AM
    • #9
    • 10th Aug 18, 8:49 AM
    Just wondering is there any liquid solution or easier way that wouldn't damage the pipe in the process.
    Originally posted by justaquestion
    I take it that you have tried boiling water?
    Never argue with stupid people, they will drag you down to their level and then beat you with experience. - Mark Twain
    • JohnB47
    • By JohnB47 10th Aug 18, 10:16 AM
    • 1,292 Posts
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    JohnB47
    Is it not possible for you to get under there and dismantle enough of the pipework so as to physically rod the pipes and fittings out? You can buy flexible cleaners with brush attachments on the end to rod out the pipework that you can't dismantle. This needs to be done around 2 yearly at most.

    All of these liquid drain unblocking solutions are short term at best, as they only clear a small proportion of the blockage each time.

    You need to physically clean out those pipes to do the job properly!
    • getmore4less
    • By getmore4less 10th Aug 18, 10:27 AM
    • 33,643 Posts
    • 20,354 Thanks
    getmore4less
    IT is probably good that this outside Ubend is catching it.

    In the winter it cools and solidifies quickly, summer it may get further.

    using hot water just melts it and it solidifies somewhere else down the system.

    It can be hard not to let any fats/oils get down the drains, scape and wipe the excess, for the last bits soap & water will make an emulsion that can be wiped again and the last bits should be stable to get through the drains.


    if you have food recycling scrapings and paper used to wipe can go in that.

    larger quantities(like fryers) need to be taken to the tip that have oil/fat recycling, this stuff does not need to go to landfill.
    • Heedtheadvice
    • By Heedtheadvice 10th Aug 18, 12:17 PM
    • 1,039 Posts
    • 522 Thanks
    Heedtheadvice
    Yes, prevention better than cure!
    However a cure is required.
    Caustic soda granules (main active ingredient of most expensive drain cleaners) is both cheap and effective.



    :Note: This is not the same as washing soda!


    Pour a few desert spoonfulls (in quantity, best not to use cutlery though!) down the sink waste adding warm (not hot water as it is an exothermic reaction and will generate heat) and leave till fat dissolves and water runs down the pipe. Will clear most organic matter.

    Repeat if necessary.
    Complete the action with a sink full of warm water, detergent and some more caustic soda to then flush through.


    Take care. Caustic soda is as the name suggests caustic. Use 'rubber' gloves keep off skin (or wash off immediately) as it turns skin into soap!!, Out of eyes off clothes etc. Unsure it is cleaned from anything it comes into contact with after use including the sink.
    • EssexExile
    • By EssexExile 10th Aug 18, 2:23 PM
    • 3,284 Posts
    • 2,333 Thanks
    EssexExile
    IT is probably good that this outside Ubend is catching it.
    Originally posted by getmore4less
    If the u-bend is outside (I didn't read it like that) then it shouldn't be, move it indoors or it will block everytime the temperature drops below freezing.
    Tall, dark & handsome. Well two out of three ain't bad.
    • that
    • By that 10th Aug 18, 5:33 PM
    • 763 Posts
    • 422 Thanks
    that
    Hairdressers get 40% hydrogen peroxide on their hands on a daily basis (from experience) it's really not as bad as this
    Originally posted by Brookside88
    That v40 hairdressing stuff is only 12% by volume, while it will not burn like acid I would not want to get it on my hand as it will burn and make skin patchy. Think it is also used to lighten skin and anal bleaching too.

    It generates a lot of oxygen in reactions. Used a lot in food stuffs. Looks like the 35% stuff is classified as a precursor and you can no longer buy it over the counter and you did have to show this concentration some respect.

    https://experthometips.com/uses-for-hydrogen-peroxide.

    Personally the plasric bends are cheap, just put new bends on as others say
    Last edited by that; 10-08-2018 at 8:33 PM.
    • JohnB47
    • By JohnB47 11th Aug 18, 12:03 AM
    • 1,292 Posts
    • 399 Thanks
    JohnB47
    Hairdressers get 40% hydrogen peroxide on their hands on a daily basis (from experience) it's really not as bad as this
    Originally posted by Brookside88
    My sister used to work as a women's hairdresser, many years ago. Her fingers were so affected by that stuff that she's had totally smooth finger tips ever since. She couldn't leave a finger print if she tried.
    • Brookside88
    • By Brookside88 11th Aug 18, 6:22 AM
    • 298 Posts
    • 385 Thanks
    Brookside88
    My sister used to work as a women's hairdresser, many years ago. Her fingers were so affected by that stuff that she's had totally smooth finger tips ever since. She couldn't leave a finger print if she tried.
    Originally posted by JohnB47
    Its a strange burn, it turns white for a bit and itches like mad. My hands look much older than their years from the constant shampooing and bleach burns
    Barclaycard CC 5,912.12/0___Virgin CC 5,536.81/5,536.81___Zopa Loan 5,680.83/4,906.17___Tesco CC 1,922.46/1,772.46___MBNA CC 6,323.15/5,696.73
    Total 19,838.56/17,912.17 (9.7%)
    • EachPenny
    • By EachPenny 11th Aug 18, 9:44 AM
    • 8,762 Posts
    • 23,905 Thanks
    EachPenny
    If the u-bend is outside (I didn't read it like that) then it shouldn't be, move it indoors or it will block everytime the temperature drops below freezing.
    Originally posted by EssexExile
    Yes, the OP is not clear ("lifting some of the fat out with a empty baked beans tin" sounds like it could actually be a gully outside, not a narrow bore waste pipe).

    But the bottom line is that any drainage system which needs regular maintenance like that to avoid blockages is poorly designed (or being abused) and the right solution is to have it modified to prevent a repeat, or modify use. If the OP is doing everything possible to avoid putting fat down the sink then a picture of the problem might help us give some advice on what changes might need to be made.

    I'm not a fan of chemical solutions - you don't really know what damage you might be doing, and if there is a blockage the last thing you want is to have to deal with pipes full of aggressive chemicals.
    "In the future, everyone will be rich for 15 minutes"
    • poppellerant
    • By poppellerant 11th Aug 18, 12:18 PM
    • 1,221 Posts
    • 696 Thanks
    poppellerant
    I use caustic soda with boiling water to clear my drains. If you are careful, you will be fine.

    Just pour a small amount of caustic soda down the plughole and follow through with boiling water from a kettle. Slowly pour the kettle around the side of the sink at arm's length. Keep pouring slowly as you hear caustic soda work its way through the pipe work. Then finish by rinsing the sink out with cold water.
    • eamon
    • By eamon 11th Aug 18, 3:29 PM
    • 1,688 Posts
    • 1,196 Thanks
    eamon
    I was trying to imagine an external sink waste & trap. As with EachPenny, the OP must be meaning the gully. Most do have a U bend that traps smell. The correct method is to avoid using chemicals, they are so dangerous in the wrong hands. I suspect that the OP is uncertain in how to dispose of fats & solidified cooking oils.
    Don't pour down the sink hole or gully. Instead get at much as possible into your rubbish bin or save for making fat balls for the birds.
    If any fat/oils remain in the cooking pan (if liquid) add some detergent a litte water mix into an emulsion (or absord with kitchen roll, expensive and not MSE), this can then go down the drain. If the fat has solidified then heat it up and do the detergent tip.
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