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  • FIRST POST
    • tjj1007
    • By tjj1007 7th Aug 18, 4:34 PM
    • 2Posts
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    tjj1007
    Advice with bedridden wife and what path to take
    • #1
    • 7th Aug 18, 4:34 PM
    Advice with bedridden wife and what path to take 7th Aug 18 at 4:34 PM
    Hello,

    My wife has been diagnosed with systemic sclerosis and is bedridden around 75% of the time. I am currently in receipt of ESA IR for long term health problems, my wife is on this claim as my partner. Given the difficulties my wife faces she requires daily help with everything, she can barely walk and is extremely poorly. Should she have her own ESA claim or PIP claim?. I am utterly confused by the various processes and what is and is not permitted when it comes to applying for one form of assistance or another. If someone could perhaps clear up what would be the best move for my wife, it would be greatly appreciated. The mounting costs of endless hospital visits out of town have finally left us to where we need to seek assistance.

    Thank you for taking the time to read.
Page 1
    • xylophone
    • By xylophone 7th Aug 18, 4:43 PM
    • 26,878 Posts
    • 16,034 Thanks
    xylophone
    • #2
    • 7th Aug 18, 4:43 PM
    • #2
    • 7th Aug 18, 4:43 PM
    https://www.gov.uk/pip

    You might consider making an appointment with a Benefits Adviser at your local CAB.
    • tboo
    • By tboo 7th Aug 18, 4:46 PM
    • 742 Posts
    • 4,152 Thanks
    tboo
    • #3
    • 7th Aug 18, 4:46 PM
    • #3
    • 7th Aug 18, 4:46 PM
    Hello,

    My wife has been diagnosed with systemic sclerosis and is bedridden around 75% of the time. I am currently in receipt of ESA IR for long term health problems, my wife is on this claim as my partner. Given the difficulties my wife faces she requires daily help with everything, she can barely walk and is extremely poorly. Should she have her own ESA claim or PIP claim?. I am utterly confused by the various processes and what is and is not permitted when it comes to applying for one form of assistance or another. If someone could perhaps clear up what would be the best move for my wife, it would be greatly appreciated. The mounting costs of endless hospital visits out of town have finally left us to where we need to seek assistance.

    Thank you for taking the time to read.
    Originally posted by tjj1007

    Yes - she applies for PIP and then if awarded a disability premium is added onto your ESA


    another link
    Started on the No Clutter thread - 25/01/2018
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    • tjj1007
    • By tjj1007 7th Aug 18, 6:55 PM
    • 2 Posts
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    tjj1007
    • #4
    • 7th Aug 18, 6:55 PM
    • #4
    • 7th Aug 18, 6:55 PM
    Thank you for your kind and speedy response, I will heed your advice and pursue PIP for her
    • poppy12345
    • By poppy12345 7th Aug 18, 7:06 PM
    • 3,605 Posts
    • 3,456 Thanks
    poppy12345
    • #5
    • 7th Aug 18, 7:06 PM
    • #5
    • 7th Aug 18, 7:06 PM
    Evidence will be needed to support a PIP claim because they very rarely contact anyone for this. Make sure it's sent with the forms, copies only of course and put NI number on all copies.

    https://www.citizensadvice.org.uk/benefits/sick-or-disabled-people-and-carers/pip/help-with-your-claim/fill-in-form/
    • calcotti
    • By calcotti 7th Aug 18, 8:27 PM
    • 647 Posts
    • 421 Thanks
    calcotti
    • #6
    • 7th Aug 18, 8:27 PM
    • #6
    • 7th Aug 18, 8:27 PM
    To answer the other part of your question. Your ESA claim should already include your wife on it as income based ESA has to be claimed as a couple.
    • Mrs_Ryan
    • By Mrs_Ryan 8th Aug 18, 12:40 AM
    • 10,676 Posts
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    Mrs_Ryan
    • #7
    • 8th Aug 18, 12:40 AM
    • #7
    • 8th Aug 18, 12:40 AM
    Definitely claim PIP, although be prepared for a fight. My sister has systemic sclerosis and because it is reasonably rare she found that no-one had a clue and she got rejected. She does however work full time, care for her husband who has severe bi polar, and also looks after her two sons.
    She is still affected horribly by it and suffers terribly like your wife but she reckons it is the rarity as no-one much has heard of it. Good luck x
    Very proud to be Open University BA (Hons) English Lang and Lit Graduate! MA English De Montfort Uni 2018- PASSED WITH MERIT!! Round 2 OU started 06/10- BSc Combined STEM, Year 1 E117 and W101.
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    • poppy12345
    • By poppy12345 8th Aug 18, 6:49 AM
    • 3,605 Posts
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    poppy12345
    • #8
    • 8th Aug 18, 6:49 AM
    • #8
    • 8th Aug 18, 6:49 AM
    Definitely claim PIP, although be prepared for a fight. My sister has systemic sclerosis and because it is reasonably rare she found that no-one had a clue and she got rejected. She does however work full time, care for her husband who has severe bi polar, and also looks after her two sons.
    She is still affected horribly by it and suffers terribly like your wife but she reckons it is the rarity as no-one much has heard of it. Good luck x
    Originally posted by Mrs_Ryan
    PIP isn't about a diagnosis, it's how those conditions affect you daily. Evidence is needed for all claims.
    • Mrs_Ryan
    • By Mrs_Ryan 8th Aug 18, 4:39 PM
    • 10,676 Posts
    • 20,201 Thanks
    Mrs_Ryan
    • #9
    • 8th Aug 18, 4:39 PM
    • #9
    • 8th Aug 18, 4:39 PM
    PIP isn't about a diagnosis, it's how those conditions affect you daily. Evidence is needed for all claims.
    Originally posted by poppy12345
    I know this is the standard line but in practice this really is not the case. Before my mental health condition was diagnosed I was zeroed as i had no diagnosis (I actually have paperwork stating this) and I have done forms for clients who have evidenced symptoms of some things but no formal diagnosis and they have been refused due to no formal diagnosis. And if you are unfortunate enough to have a condition that is rare, such as this, and you can have evidence from the worlds leading expert and it would not make a blind bit of difference because if the assessors do not know about a condition then in my extensive experience they usually zero it as they put it down to there being no evidence of what is being claimed!
    I get what you are saying as this is supposedly the theory but in practice it very much is not.
    Very proud to be Open University BA (Hons) English Lang and Lit Graduate! MA English De Montfort Uni 2018- PASSED WITH MERIT!! Round 2 OU started 06/10- BSc Combined STEM, Year 1 E117 and W101.
    Got Engaged 02/10/2018
    Miss you JV and TW
    Elle
    • xylophone
    • By xylophone 8th Aug 18, 6:26 PM
    • 26,878 Posts
    • 16,034 Thanks
    xylophone
    I know this is the standard line
    This seems based on what can or can't be done unaided rather than on any particular diagnosis?


    https://www.citizensadvice.org.uk/Global/Migrated_Documents/adviceguide/pip-9-table-of-activities-descriptors-and-points.pdf
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