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    • indierocker85
    • By indierocker85 7th Aug 18, 4:09 PM
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    indierocker85
    How important is it for a surveryor to be RICS registered?
    • #1
    • 7th Aug 18, 4:09 PM
    How important is it for a surveryor to be RICS registered? 7th Aug 18 at 4:09 PM
    Hi

    We have had a quote from a surveyor for a check on a two year old house we are buying. We were quoted 360 for a Homebuyer report style survey. I was clarifying when the surveyor, whom I should add has 40 years experience, is RICS registered or not. He told me he isn't anymore, but he was up until 2012. He said he doesn't do work for the Santanders etc anymore or "institutional work"......Is a RICS certified surveyor neccessary, and what even are the benefits of it?
    Live for what tomorrow has to bring, not what yesterday has taken away
Page 1
    • mije1983
    • By mije1983 7th Aug 18, 4:26 PM
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    mije1983
    • #2
    • 7th Aug 18, 4:26 PM
    • #2
    • 7th Aug 18, 4:26 PM
    The fact they are regulated by someone other than themselves, and that the are actually capable of doing the job. Would you trust me to survey your house for example?

    Do you have any evidence other than his word that he has experience or was registered in the past? Why is he not anymore? Is it because of something he did, or his choice not to be?

    Is there a reason you would chose one who isn't registered instead of someone who is?

    • indierocker85
    • By indierocker85 7th Aug 18, 4:35 PM
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    indierocker85
    • #3
    • 7th Aug 18, 4:35 PM
    • #3
    • 7th Aug 18, 4:35 PM
    He came highly recommended by a local estate agent, and apparently has 40 years experience. He said something along the lines of he doesn't do insitution work anymore for the likes of Santander etc. I can verify he was registered with them, as a search of him did come up on RICS, but i ony have his word as to why he isn't now to be honest.

    Not really sure what to so, and no, there isn't a reason for choosing one who isn't versus who is, We are first time buyers so we are all new to it....
    Live for what tomorrow has to bring, not what yesterday has taken away
    • Eels100
    • By Eels100 7th Aug 18, 4:41 PM
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    Eels100
    • #4
    • 7th Aug 18, 4:41 PM
    • #4
    • 7th Aug 18, 4:41 PM
    If your homebuyer's report comes back all good, you buy the house, and then it cracks in two or the roof leaks massively or a boundary wall collapses the next day, will your non-regulated surveyor pay for the repairs of what they missed?
    • cloo
    • By cloo 7th Aug 18, 4:43 PM
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    cloo
    • #5
    • 7th Aug 18, 4:43 PM
    • #5
    • 7th Aug 18, 4:43 PM
    It may just be he didn't want to pay RICS fees anymore and felt he didn't need it for doing his sort of work. But it would be harder to get recourse if he misses anything important.
    • mije1983
    • By mije1983 7th Aug 18, 4:44 PM
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    mije1983
    • #6
    • 7th Aug 18, 4:44 PM
    • #6
    • 7th Aug 18, 4:44 PM
    He came highly recommended by a local estate agent
    Originally posted by indierocker85
    Ah, so he is probably paying the EA a hefty commission to be recommended rather than actually being recommended because he is good.

    If there is no/little cost difference I would go with a regulated one every time.

    • Tomg84
    • By Tomg84 7th Aug 18, 4:45 PM
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    Tomg84
    • #7
    • 7th Aug 18, 4:45 PM
    • #7
    • 7th Aug 18, 4:45 PM
    I don't understand why he wouldn't maintain his registration as its not that expensive in the grand scheme of things. The question is also liability. Do they have professional liability insurance in case they make an error?

    Personally, I would not get a survey from a non-RICS member. This is the biggest purchase you'll ever make. I doubt using him will save that much money
    • indierocker85
    • By indierocker85 7th Aug 18, 4:47 PM
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    indierocker85
    • #8
    • 7th Aug 18, 4:47 PM
    • #8
    • 7th Aug 18, 4:47 PM
    Ah, so he is probably paying the EA a hefty commission to be recommended rather than actually being recommended because he is good.

    If there is no/little cost difference I would go with a regulated one every time.
    Originally posted by mije1983
    No, other people locally recommended him too..........
    Live for what tomorrow has to bring, not what yesterday has taken away
    • eddddy
    • By eddddy 7th Aug 18, 4:50 PM
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    eddddy
    • #9
    • 7th Aug 18, 4:50 PM
    • #9
    • 7th Aug 18, 4:50 PM
    Having jumped through all the loops to get RICS membership, it seems strange that the surveyor has decided not to continue it. (The annual subscription is only about 600.)

    TBH, I can't see a 'positive' reason for ending membership.

    I guess it could be that the surveyor doesn't want to be bound by the RICS rules of conduct, or their Ethics and Professional Standards...

    ... or perhaps he even got struck off.

    But who knows?

    See:
    https://www.rics.org/uk/regulation1/rules-of-conduct1/
    https://www.rics.org/uk/regulation1/compliance1/ethics--professional-standards/
    • indierocker85
    • By indierocker85 7th Aug 18, 4:55 PM
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    indierocker85
    In their FAQ is states "Yes, ******* Ltd holds indemnity cover and is a member of the Surveyors Ombudsman Service"
    Live for what tomorrow has to bring, not what yesterday has taken away
    • indierocker85
    • By indierocker85 7th Aug 18, 4:58 PM
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    indierocker85
    Ok - Will have a think about all of this, feeling a bit differently about it now
    Live for what tomorrow has to bring, not what yesterday has taken away
    • lincroft1710
    • By lincroft1710 7th Aug 18, 6:25 PM
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    lincroft1710
    Unlike other insurances, a surveyor's insurance premium will actually increase the longer they are practising as the more properties they survey, the more chance of an error and thus a claim on the insurance,

    So I could understand if the surveyor was not paying for insurance (although a very unwise move) but not continuing with his RICS subscription
    • indierocker85
    • By indierocker85 7th Aug 18, 6:29 PM
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    indierocker85
    I have since spoken to a RIC surveyor, who coincidentally was the same one the lender appointed to do a valuation report. And he said as its a 2 year old property, he doesn't understand why we even want a survey anyway..............So confusing.
    Live for what tomorrow has to bring, not what yesterday has taken away
    • financegeek
    • By financegeek 7th Aug 18, 7:32 PM
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    financegeek
    I wouldn't use a surveyor who wasn't registered with the relevant body. would you use a solicitor who's not registered with the law society? or a mortgage lender who's not registered with the FCA?

    if they're not registered there's usually a reason and having to pay 600.00 as a membership fee doesn't sound like a good enough one to cancel membership (to me anyway!)

    if you decide to proceed with a survey, i'd look for independent RICs surveyors in your area.

    i can see the surveyors point regarding not necessarily needing a further survey. i assume he's been out to the property and done the mortgage valuation report, so has seen that it's in decent condition. couple that with (i assume) it still being covered by an New build certificate (NHBC) for any major defects for the next 8 years, it probably seems a bit overkill to him.

    the decision is yours though and if you'd feel more comfortable having a full survey done then go for it, i'd just ensure you use someone who's a current RICs member
    • ruperts
    • By ruperts 7th Aug 18, 8:08 PM
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    ruperts
    RICS membership is hundreds of pounds per year and requires you to keep doing CPD. If you can get enough business without it, why would you bother? After 40 years you might start thinking you don't need to pay for someone sat in an office to confirm you know how to do your job.
    • 00ec25
    • By 00ec25 7th Aug 18, 8:12 PM
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    00ec25
    lots of cynicism on here

    - so you are content he has 40 years experience
    - you are content he was a registered member as "recent" as 2012
    - if you are concerned over possible professional body sanctions against him then review the member disciplinary decisions. If he has been reprimanded his name will appear.

    - he is close to/beyond retirement
    - he has stated he no longer works for the institutions so has no client imposed requirment to be registered
    - he is probably picking and choosing his workload as he winds down to retirement. You say it is a 2 year old property so he knows it is money for old job to do a survey of such a property and he has priced accordingly
    - 600 is still 600, this is MSE afterall
    - he can still be insured and competent despite not being a current paid up member
    • 00ec25
    • By 00ec25 7th Aug 18, 8:15 PM
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    00ec25
    RICS membership is hundreds of pounds per year and requires you to keep doing CPD. If you can get enough business without it, why would you bother? After 40 years you might start thinking you don't need to pay for someone sat in an office to confirm you know how to do your job.
    Originally posted by ruperts
    exactly. I know several accountants who no longer pay their subs for exactly the same reason. they can still do accounts and they keep up to date on the types of work that is relevant to them, not going on any old CPD just to meet a professional body requirement to have done x hours per year for the sale of it.
    • davidmcn
    • By davidmcn 7th Aug 18, 8:17 PM
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    davidmcn
    would you use a solicitor who's not registered with the law society? or a mortgage lender who's not registered with the FCA?
    Originally posted by financegeek
    A rather significant difference being that it's illegal for either of these things to exist...
    • G_M
    • By G_M 7th Aug 18, 8:54 PM
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    G_M
    Yea hut but I could offer to do the conveyancing for the OP and not charge him a penny.


    Nothing illegal there......
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