Your browser isn't supported
It looks like you're using an old web browser. To get the most out of the site and to ensure guides display correctly, we suggest upgrading your browser now. Download the latest:

Welcome to the MSE Forums

We're home to a fantastic community of MoneySavers but anyone can post. Please exercise caution & report spam, illegal, offensive or libellous posts/messages: click "report" or email forumteam@. Skimlinks & other affiliated links are turned on

Search
  • FIRST POST
    • ellectrastar
    • By ellectrastar 7th Aug 18, 3:28 PM
    • 100Posts
    • 10Thanks
    ellectrastar
    Concrete block construction
    • #1
    • 7th Aug 18, 3:28 PM
    Concrete block construction 7th Aug 18 at 3:28 PM
    Just a quick question - if a property is constructed of concrete blocks and rendered, is this inferior to being built of bricks?
Page 1
    • Doozergirl
    • By Doozergirl 7th Aug 18, 3:38 PM
    • 25,941 Posts
    • 70,149 Thanks
    Doozergirl
    • #2
    • 7th Aug 18, 3:38 PM
    • #2
    • 7th Aug 18, 3:38 PM
    Not in any meaningful way, no.

    Traditional render finish comes with elements of maintenance, but blocks themselves aren't inferior at all. Even brick houses have been built with block inner skins for years.
    Last edited by Doozergirl; 07-08-2018 at 3:40 PM.
    Everything that is supposed to be in heaven is already here on earth.
    • FreeBear
    • By FreeBear 7th Aug 18, 3:59 PM
    • 1,976 Posts
    • 2,817 Thanks
    FreeBear
    • #3
    • 7th Aug 18, 3:59 PM
    • #3
    • 7th Aug 18, 3:59 PM
    but blocks themselves aren't inferior at all. Even brick houses have been built with block inner skins for years.
    Originally posted by Doozergirl
    Internally, it is common to see aerated blocks used - These have better insulating properties than traditional concrete or even brick. It also has the advantage of reducing build time (fewer blocks to lay compared to brick). There is also a trend to use aerated block for the outer skin as well. Have a look for "Ytong block construction" - A very quick way to throw up a house with good thermal properties.
    Her courage will change the world.

    Treasure the moments that you have. Savour them for as long as you can for they will never come back again.
    • Grenage
    • By Grenage 7th Aug 18, 4:13 PM
    • 1,584 Posts
    • 1,512 Thanks
    Grenage
    • #4
    • 7th Aug 18, 4:13 PM
    • #4
    • 7th Aug 18, 4:13 PM
    Aerated blocks are a pain in the !!! for fixings, though.
    • ellectrastar
    • By ellectrastar 9th Aug 18, 1:18 PM
    • 100 Posts
    • 10 Thanks
    ellectrastar
    • #5
    • 9th Aug 18, 1:18 PM
    • #5
    • 9th Aug 18, 1:18 PM
    It's on an existing property and described as "concrete cavity wall blocks" so I imagine that's two layers of normal concrete blocks with the cavity in the centre. I think it was built in the 70s so guess no insulation unless done at a later date. I know I've seen the new builds springing up everywhere with the concrete inner walls and brick outers. I guess if it's to be rendered there was no point using bricks as you wouldn't see them. I didn't know if this sort of construction had different implications for insurance purposes. Or whether it's pretty normal...
    • EachPenny
    • By EachPenny 9th Aug 18, 2:48 PM
    • 7,219 Posts
    • 19,576 Thanks
    EachPenny
    • #6
    • 9th Aug 18, 2:48 PM
    • #6
    • 9th Aug 18, 2:48 PM
    It's on an existing property and described as "concrete cavity wall blocks" so I imagine that's two layers of normal concrete blocks with the cavity in the centre.
    Originally posted by ellectrastar
    That phrase could cover a variety of things. One of which is concrete blocks which have internal cavities, but are 'solid' at the ends and often in the middle. These are less efficient than a true cavity and may be subject to problems with cold spots.

    If the phrase used was "concrete block cavity wall" it would be more likely to imply a conventional cavity (as we use the term now) between two separate (but tied) walls.
    "In the future, everyone will be rich for 15 minutes"
    • teneighty
    • By teneighty 9th Aug 18, 3:28 PM
    • 1,207 Posts
    • 866 Thanks
    teneighty
    • #7
    • 9th Aug 18, 3:28 PM
    • #7
    • 9th Aug 18, 3:28 PM
    The thickness of the walls will probably be the easier way to determine whether they are hollow concrete blocks or a more traditional block cavity wall.

    The former can suffer from water penetration, cold bridging and condensation.
    • Davesnave
    • By Davesnave 10th Aug 18, 6:35 AM
    • 26,379 Posts
    • 95,429 Thanks
    Davesnave
    • #8
    • 10th Aug 18, 6:35 AM
    • #8
    • 10th Aug 18, 6:35 AM
    To be frank, if it's an estate agent that has written the description, the chances are it will not be from any kind of special knowledge; just what they usually write for properties of that type and age.


    I have a rendered 70s bungalow described like that, which turned-out to be mostly rendered brick and block.
    A garden is never so good as it will be next year....
Welcome to our new Forum!

Our aim is to save you money quickly and easily. We hope you like it!

Forum Team Contact us

Live Stats

43Posts Today

3,271Users online

Martin's Twitter
  • Lovely package on #newsnight just now about Brexit hitchhiking, livened up what has been not the most exciting show.

  • Is this is a serious tweet or a joke? Why did I mention he was a cyclist - because he was a cyclist. Eh? https://t.co/F1SP7UJZkH

  • How awful Mark. This is why those people who take risks on the road, have to realise while they think they're gamb? https://t.co/berU23vQOU

  • Follow Martin