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    • Mohsin125
    • By Mohsin125 7th Aug 18, 12:58 PM
    • 10Posts
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    Mohsin125
    Painting lounge walls
    • #1
    • 7th Aug 18, 12:58 PM
    Painting lounge walls 7th Aug 18 at 12:58 PM
    Hi everyone,

    I have recently bought my first house! I am planning to paint the lounge however have no experience in how to prep the walls for paint. I am currently removing wallpaper from the walls and will take me few more days to complete the job. Once these are removed, I am not sure about the following:

    - Do I need to plaster the walls after removing wallpapers? Will this be on all the walls or just bits where its needed?

    - Can I straight away paint on the walls or will have to apply another product on the walls before painting? I get a bit confused with all the various types of painting products!

    - Lastly, what paint do I need for lounge walls?

    Thanks everyone. Hoping to build my DIY skills starting from painting!
Page 1
    • onomatopoeia99
    • By onomatopoeia99 7th Aug 18, 6:41 PM
    • 5,011 Posts
    • 11,285 Thanks
    onomatopoeia99
    • #2
    • 7th Aug 18, 6:41 PM
    • #2
    • 7th Aug 18, 6:41 PM
    Whether or not you need to replaster depends on the state of the walls after the paper is removed. If you don't have a smooth plaster finish left, but big gouges from the wallpaper scraper or bits of the plaster have blown and flaked away then you may need to replaster some or all of the walls.



    You can paint directly on the walls. Washing them down to remove wallpaper adhesive would be advisable, or if they are really sticky with adhesive, use sugar soap. If you replaster, you should do a "mist coat" onto the new plaster of about 75% cheap white emulsion plus 25% water first (you mix this yourself, they don't sell it premixed in B&Q) and let that dry before putting the colour on.


    Paint for lounge walls? I prefer emulsion. Magnolia seems the most popular colour judging by the homes of friends, though they seem to give it fancy names these days. Whatever they call it, it's still magnolia and every paint manufacturer makes it.
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    • bob_a_builder
    • By bob_a_builder 7th Aug 18, 7:31 PM
    • 1,634 Posts
    • 794 Thanks
    bob_a_builder
    • #3
    • 7th Aug 18, 7:31 PM
    • #3
    • 7th Aug 18, 7:31 PM
    Paint for lounge walls? I prefer emulsion.
    and importantly MATT emulsion - anything else will show every blemish in the wall
    • Mohsin125
    • By Mohsin125 8th Aug 18, 9:10 AM
    • 10 Posts
    • 0 Thanks
    Mohsin125
    • #4
    • 8th Aug 18, 9:10 AM
    • #4
    • 8th Aug 18, 9:10 AM
    Thanks for the replies
    • armchaireconomist
    • By armchaireconomist 8th Aug 18, 12:16 PM
    • 342 Posts
    • 418 Thanks
    armchaireconomist
    • #5
    • 8th Aug 18, 12:16 PM
    • #5
    • 8th Aug 18, 12:16 PM
    Providing plaster is sound underneath, take out any imperfections with some all-purpose powder filler (if you make a mess of it it can easily be sanded back) and a scraper.
    • Mohsin125
    • By Mohsin125 8th Aug 18, 2:25 PM
    • 10 Posts
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    Mohsin125
    • #6
    • 8th Aug 18, 2:25 PM
    • #6
    • 8th Aug 18, 2:25 PM
    Thanks, I will give this a shot. I don't think the walls are majorly chipped etc so I'll try using a filler. Will watch youtube videos to see how its done.

    So I have managed to remove the wallpaper today. Do I need to sand all the walls now?
    • armchaireconomist
    • By armchaireconomist 8th Aug 18, 4:43 PM
    • 342 Posts
    • 418 Thanks
    armchaireconomist
    • #7
    • 8th Aug 18, 4:43 PM
    • #7
    • 8th Aug 18, 4:43 PM
    You don't need to sand them, no. Depends how good the surface is - is it flat and smooth? Personally i'd just fill the imperfections, quick run over with orbital sander and paint it up.
    • Robby1988
    • By Robby1988 8th Aug 18, 10:55 PM
    • 79 Posts
    • 36 Thanks
    Robby1988
    • #8
    • 8th Aug 18, 10:55 PM
    • #8
    • 8th Aug 18, 10:55 PM
    Polyfilla is your friend. Work it into the imperfections with a flexible filler tool, leave overnight and then sand down with fine paper and once it's painted it'll look fine. Just make sure you give the wall a good clean down first with a damp cloth and leave to dry. I don't think you can be too OTT with painting prep, it's a boring job worth doing right first time.

    I'd always use to packets of powder you mix yourself for the filler, always found the premixed tubes a bit naff so don't be tempted.
    • deannatrois
    • By deannatrois 9th Aug 18, 4:28 AM
    • 5,730 Posts
    • 8,035 Thanks
    deannatrois
    • #9
    • 9th Aug 18, 4:28 AM
    • #9
    • 9th Aug 18, 4:28 AM
    I agree. The premixed stuff sets like concrete so sanding it to acheive a smooth finish is a nightmare.

    I find I spend longer prepping than I do painting. Run hands over walls, inspect visually to find imperfections. The first coat of paint may show up anything you missed as well.

    Start with a room where the odd imperfection won't matter so much. Do the lounge last. By the time you get there, you will have learned all you need to know. You tube videos are generally good, but I tend to watch a few until I find one that makes sense to me, sometimes the people who post don't actually know what they are doing, in my experience.

    I always paint woodwork first. Then the walls. Saves you some 'oh god I have just painted the wall with gloss' errors due to bad brush work (which I suffer from).
    • LandyAndy
    • By LandyAndy 9th Aug 18, 11:47 AM
    • 24,566 Posts
    • 51,822 Thanks
    LandyAndy
    Polyfilla is your friend. Work it into the imperfections with a flexible filler tool, leave overnight and then sand down with fine paper and once it's painted it'll look fine. Just make sure you give the wall a good clean down first with a damp cloth and leave to dry. I don't think you can be too OTT with painting prep, it's a boring job worth doing right first time.

    I'd always use to packets of powder you mix yourself for the filler, always found the premixed tubes a bit naff so don't be tempted.
    Originally posted by Robby1988
    I find the ideal tool is an old credit card (or similar sized plastic card). Just the right combination of stiffness, size and flexibility.

    And, yes, prep time is never wasted.
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