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  • FIRST POST
    • Hani.86
    • By Hani.86 7th Aug 18, 12:21 PM
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    Hani.86
    1 week notice - how does it work?
    • #1
    • 7th Aug 18, 12:21 PM
    1 week notice - how does it work? 7th Aug 18 at 12:21 PM
    I have to give a week's notice to my employer. I always thought that it means e.g. If I give notice on Monday, my last day would be Sunday.

    But then I saw on the government website that "Your notice period usually runs from the start of the day after you handed your notice in." so giving notice on Monday would mean, that the last day would be the following Monday...

    But it says "usually", not that it must be this way..
    Which way is correct?
Page 1
    • sangie595
    • By sangie595 7th Aug 18, 12:26 PM
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    sangie595
    • #2
    • 7th Aug 18, 12:26 PM
    • #2
    • 7th Aug 18, 12:26 PM
    It's the day after you hand in your notice. That means if toy hand it in on Monday then your last day will be the following Monday.
    • General Grant
    • By General Grant 7th Aug 18, 12:27 PM
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    General Grant
    • #3
    • 7th Aug 18, 12:27 PM
    • #3
    • 7th Aug 18, 12:27 PM
    One thought:

    You could hand in your notice on Monday but it might not reach the required person until Tuesday so that your notice period begins on the Wednesday.

    Another:

    Your contract may stipulate that a one-month notice could only start on the first day of the following month. (I worked under such a contract at one time.) In this case someone handing in their notice on, for example, 5 April, would find their notice expired on 31 May.
    • General Grant
    • By General Grant 7th Aug 18, 12:28 PM
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    General Grant
    • #4
    • 7th Aug 18, 12:28 PM
    • #4
    • 7th Aug 18, 12:28 PM
    It's the day after you hand in your notice. That means if toy hand it in on Monday then your last day will be the following Monday.
    Originally posted by sangie595
    I think the question was about the use of the word "usually".
    • sangie595
    • By sangie595 7th Aug 18, 12:31 PM
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    sangie595
    • #5
    • 7th Aug 18, 12:31 PM
    • #5
    • 7th Aug 18, 12:31 PM
    I think the question was about the use of the word "usually".
    Originally posted by General Grant
    Well I've never come across a situation where it didn't apply so I wouldn't know! But the advice on Gov.uk is often misleading, so who knows what they meant? It is correct that it starts the day after handing it in.
    • Dox
    • By Dox 7th Aug 18, 12:31 PM
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    Dox
    • #6
    • 7th Aug 18, 12:31 PM
    • #6
    • 7th Aug 18, 12:31 PM
    The notice period will start from the start of the day after the day that notice was given. If a week's notice is given on Monday then the start of the notice period will be Tuesday and it will expire on the following Monday.

    In practice, many firms (and individuals) take no notice of this and the day they give notice is counted as the first day of that notice period.
    • sangie595
    • By sangie595 7th Aug 18, 12:35 PM
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    sangie595
    • #7
    • 7th Aug 18, 12:35 PM
    • #7
    • 7th Aug 18, 12:35 PM
    One thought:

    You could hand in your notice on Monday but it might not reach the required person until Tuesday so that your notice period begins on the Wednesday.

    Another:

    Your contract may stipulate that a one-month notice could only start on the first day of the following month. (I worked under such a contract at one time.) In this case someone handing in their notice on, for example, 5 April, would find their notice expired on 31 May.
    Originally posted by General Grant
    The second one is interesting. Can't imagine how that would need enforceable, but as a purely contractual term, I suppose it is down to "if you agree, you've agreed".

    The first one isn't right - if it doesn't get to the right person that's the employers problem. Otherwise the right person might be in Croatia for the next four weeks. If needs only to be received by someone acting on behalf of the employer, so an admin or office worker, any manager - basically, no different than posting it, where you have no control over who opens the mail.
    • TELLIT01
    • By TELLIT01 7th Aug 18, 12:52 PM
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    TELLIT01
    • #8
    • 7th Aug 18, 12:52 PM
    • #8
    • 7th Aug 18, 12:52 PM
    One thought:

    You could hand in your notice on Monday but it might not reach the required person until Tuesday so that your notice period begins on the Wednesday.

    .
    Originally posted by General Grant

    Not true. If you hand your notice in on the Monday it's not your problem if the person who can action it isn't available. You have done your part by handing in it.

    Otherwise you might hand your notice in and the person who is supposed to action it is on holiday for 2 weeks. Are you suggesting the notice period would start until they returned from holiday?
    • General Grant
    • By General Grant 7th Aug 18, 1:25 PM
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    General Grant
    • #9
    • 7th Aug 18, 1:25 PM
    • #9
    • 7th Aug 18, 1:25 PM
    Not true. If you hand your notice in on the Monday it's not your problem if the person who can action it isn't available. You have done your part by handing in it.

    Otherwise you might hand your notice in and the person who is supposed to action it is on holiday for 2 weeks. Are you suggesting the notice period would start until they returned from holiday?
    Originally posted by TELLIT01
    Hand in your notice to the cleaner on Monday night when your contract says it must be delivered to your line manager or HR?
    • Undervalued
    • By Undervalued 7th Aug 18, 4:09 PM
    • 3,253 Posts
    • 2,961 Thanks
    Undervalued
    One thought:

    You could hand in your notice on Monday but it might not reach the required person until Tuesdayso that your notice period begins on the Wednesday.
    Originally posted by General Grant
    No, that is not the employee's problem.

    It is no different to if they send their notice by post. In a large organisation it would first be delivered to the post room or reception. How long they take to distribute it internally to the correct person could vary hugely depending on their policies (and efficiency)! The notice is legally "served" when it reaches the company, not a specific individual within the company, and takes effect the following day.
    • Les79
    • By Les79 7th Aug 18, 6:44 PM
    • 361 Posts
    • 427 Thanks
    Les79
    Hand in your notice to the cleaner on Monday night when your contract says it must be delivered to your line manager or HR?
    Originally posted by General Grant
    Well, if you handed it in to someone not authorised to accept it then you are effectively just not handing in your notice at all....

    If presented with such a scenario (ie the line manager, other managers and all the HR staff being unavailable; yea right btw!), any sensible person would serve their notice via email.
    • TELLIT01
    • By TELLIT01 7th Aug 18, 6:59 PM
    • 5,242 Posts
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    TELLIT01
    Hand in your notice to the cleaner on Monday night when your contract says it must be delivered to your line manager or HR?
    Originally posted by General Grant

    Using a ridiculous scenario to back up your incorrect assertion doesn't change the facts.
    • MarkN88
    • By MarkN88 7th Aug 18, 7:13 PM
    • 124 Posts
    • 53 Thanks
    MarkN88
    I!!!8217;ve always hand delivered the letter to who it needs to go to.

    I!!!8217;ve always dated the letter I handed it in.

    Depending on what was in my contract I always specified what my last working day was according to what required notice was asked for.
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