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  • FIRST POST
    • LuckyEddy56
    • By LuckyEddy56 6th Aug 18, 9:06 PM
    • 14Posts
    • 2Thanks
    LuckyEddy56
    The seller now wants more money
    • #1
    • 6th Aug 18, 9:06 PM
    The seller now wants more money 6th Aug 18 at 9:06 PM
    I bought a motorcycle cheaply from a nice old lady who's son had left it sitting in her garden for years. I made an offer, the old lady told me she would consult her family to check if the offer was acceptable, she said she had checked and that it was. Now, after I got the bike through the MOT without having to spend much, her granddaughter has contacted me saying she wants more money or the bike back and that the old lady never had the right to sell it to me, also, as the old lady and I both signed the V5 in the names of someone else, ( I signed it in my sons name as I was buying it for him, she signed it in her sons name as he is disabled and unable to deal with it himself), the granddaughter is also threatening to report the bike as stolen if I don't pay her more or give the bike back. I don't know where I stand ? Can someone please advise me what to do? Thank you.
Page 2
    • AdrianC
    • By AdrianC 6th Aug 18, 10:33 PM
    • 19,719 Posts
    • 18,292 Thanks
    AdrianC
    Just don't reply. Ignore her. Block her number.
    • AndyMc.....
    • By AndyMc..... 6th Aug 18, 10:34 PM
    • 2,569 Posts
    • 1,585 Thanks
    AndyMc.....
    Thanks Adrian, that makes me feel a whole lot better. I will inform her that I have no intention of giving her any more money nor will I be returning the bike, then it's up to her if she wants to attempt to claim it had been stolen? Thanks mate
    Originally posted by LuckyEddy56
    Just make sure your son has enough money for the bus home if they do report it stolen.
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    • AndyMc.....
    • By AndyMc..... 6th Aug 18, 10:36 PM
    • 2,569 Posts
    • 1,585 Thanks
    AndyMc.....
    Only if you ignore the fact it's borderline scrap.

    It's a 6-11yo bike. Value is a very wide spread, based on condition. This sounds like a shed that might, with a lot of time and parts, be worth the good condition value.
    Originally posted by AdrianC
    Sounds like it went through the mot with only a new battery and air in the tyres. Hardly borderline scrap.

    If you believe the disabled son rides a 1200 bandit then best of luck to you.
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    • LuckyEddy56
    • By LuckyEddy56 6th Aug 18, 10:41 PM
    • 14 Posts
    • 2 Thanks
    LuckyEddy56
    Actually, I was thinking of copying and pasting all of the answers I have got and explaining to her that she will need to pursue the matter through the court? what do you think?
    • AndyMc.....
    • By AndyMc..... 6th Aug 18, 10:46 PM
    • 2,569 Posts
    • 1,585 Thanks
    AndyMc.....
    Actually, I was thinking of copying and pasting all of the answers I have got and explaining to her that she will need to pursue the matter through the court? what do you think?
    Originally posted by LuckyEddy56
    I think if the grandaughter phones the local police and reports it stolen, some civilian with no legal training may record the crime to be investigated. The bike will go on the PNC as stolen and the rider may get stopped, arrested and the bike seized.
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    • LuckyEddy56
    • By LuckyEddy56 6th Aug 18, 11:22 PM
    • 14 Posts
    • 2 Thanks
    LuckyEddy56
    Hopefully, if the matter is explained in full, the police will either tell her that as the bike has not actually been "stolen" or they will come to the registered keepers house ( me ) to investigate it. I really don't think any crime has been committed? I think she is just hoping i will give her more money? Anyway, we will see! Thanks for the comment
    • LuckyEddy56
    • By LuckyEddy56 6th Aug 18, 11:28 PM
    • 14 Posts
    • 2 Thanks
    LuckyEddy56
    No, unfortunately, he had a stoke while he was at work and not riding the bike, it's very sad. and yes, it did, but the tyres did need replacing because of flat spots in the rubber, they never noticed at the MOT center, and there is a fair bit of cosmetic damage too. Actually, it had been written off once and the guy bought it back and got it back on the road, but he never replaced the tank or fairing, they are still broken.
    • LuckyEddy56
    • By LuckyEddy56 6th Aug 18, 11:31 PM
    • 14 Posts
    • 2 Thanks
    LuckyEddy56
    He gave me back my CBR1000f when he got the bandit, so worst ways he'll be back on the CBR ( but I seriously doubt that she will report her Nan for selling her Dad's bike do you?
    • LuckyEddy56
    • By LuckyEddy56 6th Aug 18, 11:35 PM
    • 14 Posts
    • 2 Thanks
    LuckyEddy56
    Thank you all so much for your support, it has been really helpful. Anyway, I sent her this message and we will see what she does. Hi Donna, I have had a busy day looking into our dilemma and deciding what to do about your threat of going to the police to report the bike as stolen. My poor son has been worried sick and was afraid to go out on the bike until I had looked into it. I have now had legal advise (including a little from the police crime watch officer at Marks gate), that suggests that if what you say is true, and that your Nan knowingly sold your dad's property without the family consent and permission, (as both your Nan and Granddad clearly stated they had when I bought the bike), then the only person that has actually committed a "crime" that could be reported to the police, is, unfortunately, your poor 87 year old Nan? (apparently the log book signing doesn't matter as it just changes the keeper details and writing and signing on behalf of someone else isn't classed as "a crime") and we all know that the bike was not "stolen". Anyway, here are just a few of the many comments and responses I got when I asked for advice on the net. (attached) So, after much consideration, unfortunately, my position now is that until I hear from your legal representatives, I am just going to continue helping my son restore and repair his new bike. I would appreciate it if you would kindly refrain from contacting me yourself from now on, and leave it in the hands of our legal teams to sort it out. Bye for now, Yours regretfully, Eddy.
    • unholyangel
    • By unholyangel 6th Aug 18, 11:43 PM
    • 13,062 Posts
    • 10,404 Thanks
    unholyangel
    The V5C has nothing to do with ownership, although it does rather underscore the risks of buying a vehicle from someone who isn't the registered keeper.

    If you already have a record of her saying that her mother sold it to you (albeit she's disputing that she was allowed to) I don't think they are going to come after you for theft. Most people don't write / text / email / phone motorbike thieves.
    Originally posted by Arklight
    IMO they'd be more likely to go after the gran than the OP for theft - as she's the one who allegedly was dishonest in their appropriation of someone elses property.


    If you believe the disabled son rides a 1200 bandit then best of luck to you.
    Originally posted by AndyMc.....
    OP said the womans son (who she was selling the bike on behalf of) was disabled, not the OP's son.
    Money doesn't solve poverty.....it creates it.
    • loskie
    • By loskie 7th Aug 18, 7:25 AM
    • 1,431 Posts
    • 848 Thanks
    loskie
    If the granddaughter does report you to the Police it is likely that she will be incriminating granny more than you.
    • AndyMc.....
    • By AndyMc..... 7th Aug 18, 7:29 AM
    • 2,569 Posts
    • 1,585 Thanks
    AndyMc.....
    If the granddaughter does report you to the Police it is likely that she will be incriminating granny more than you.
    Originally posted by loskie
    Other way round, the op would be handling.
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    • mollycat
    • By mollycat 7th Aug 18, 7:43 AM
    • 1,109 Posts
    • 2,211 Thanks
    mollycat
    Thank you all so much for your support, it has been really helpful. Anyway, I sent her this message and we will see what she does. Hi Donna, I have had a busy day looking into our dilemma and deciding what to do about your threat of going to the police to report the bike as stolen. My poor son has been worried sick and was afraid to go out on the bike until I had looked into it. I have now had legal advise (including a little from the police crime watch officer at Marks gate), that suggests that if what you say is true, and that your Nan knowingly sold your dad's property without the family consent and permission, (as both your Nan and Granddad clearly stated they had when I bought the bike), then the only person that has actually committed a "crime" that could be reported to the police, is, unfortunately, your poor 87 year old Nan? (apparently the log book signing doesn't matter as it just changes the keeper details and writing and signing on behalf of someone else isn't classed as "a crime") and we all know that the bike was not "stolen". Anyway, here are just a few of the many comments and responses I got when I asked for advice on the net. (attached) So, after much consideration, unfortunately, my position now is that until I hear from your legal representatives, I am just going to continue helping my son restore and repair his new bike. I would appreciate it if you would kindly refrain from contacting me yourself from now on, and leave it in the hands of our legal teams to sort it out. Bye for now, Yours regretfully, Eddy.
    Originally posted by LuckyEddy56
    I honestly think the good advice given earlier in the thread to ignore/block etc was the better way to go.

    You have now initiated correspondence, (of sorts), on the matter which is more likely to perpetuate the matter than simply ignoring would have done.

    Hopefully I'm wrong and you hear no more of it. Good luck.
    • AdrianC
    • By AdrianC 7th Aug 18, 7:45 AM
    • 19,719 Posts
    • 18,292 Thanks
    AdrianC
    If you believe the disabled son rides a 1200 bandit then best of luck to you.
    Originally posted by AndyMc.....
    Not everybody disabled started their life with their disability.

    Perhaps he didn't only ride the Bandit...?
    • Supersonos
    • By Supersonos 7th Aug 18, 8:05 AM
    • 179 Posts
    • 69 Thanks
    Supersonos
    I bought a motorcycle cheaply from a nice old lady who's son had left it sitting in her garden for years. I made an offer, the old lady told me she would consult her family to check if the offer was acceptable, she said she had checked and that it was. Now, after I got the bike through the MOT without having to spend much, her granddaughter has contacted me saying she wants more money or the bike back and that the old lady never had the right to sell it to me, also, as the old lady and I both signed the V5 in the names of someone else, ( I signed it in my sons name as I was buying it for him, she signed it in her sons name as he is disabled and unable to deal with it himself), the granddaughter is also threatening to report the bike as stolen if I don't pay her more or give the bike back. I don't know where I stand ? Can someone please advise me what to do? Thank you.
    Originally posted by LuckyEddy56
    I think the points here are that the old lady is the one who stole the bike. You legitimately purchased it for an agreed sum. The lady suggested to you she had the authority to sell it.

    The granddaughter (I assume the daughter of the guy who used to own it) is admitting there was the intention to sell it - she's just not happy with the price - so she can't now claim you stole it.

    Interesting that at no time you've mentioned the actual previous owner. Someone who doesn't own it sold it to you and someone else who doesn't own it is making threats. I'd say just ignore them or, if you want to be nice, offer it back to them for the £300 plus any costs you've incurred to date.
    • arcon5
    • By arcon5 7th Aug 18, 8:31 AM
    • 13,631 Posts
    • 8,641 Thanks
    arcon5
    Tell her you bought it fair and square and if it's reported stolen then you will consider her actions fraudulent and make your own police report.


    Although I'd be surprised if the police did actually take it seriously.
    • wgl2014
    • By wgl2014 7th Aug 18, 8:58 AM
    • 952 Posts
    • 607 Thanks
    wgl2014
    Civil matter all day long.

    Theft requires dishonesty as does handling stolen goods.

    Agreeing to buy a bike at below market value is a long way from that!

    If a relative reports the bike as stolen they will struggle to explain how the suspect now appears as the registered keeper and has the bike insured.

    OP - sorry if I missed it but do you have a receipt for the sale?
    • foxy-stoat
    • By foxy-stoat 7th Aug 18, 8:59 AM
    • 3,221 Posts
    • 1,821 Thanks
    foxy-stoat
    Did she give you a receipt for the bike when you bought it?

    That is the only legal document you need to prove who actually owns the bike.

    If she didnt have "good title" then thats your only sticking point.
    • droopsnoot
    • By droopsnoot 7th Aug 18, 12:10 PM
    • 1,190 Posts
    • 754 Thanks
    droopsnoot
    I honestly think the good advice given earlier in the thread to ignore/block etc was the better way to go.
    Originally posted by mollycat

    Indeed, I think I'd have simply said to the granddaughter "I didn't buy the bike from you, if your grandmother has an issue then she needs to contact me and discuss it. I won't speak to anyone other than the person I did the deal with."
    • ttoli
    • By ttoli 7th Aug 18, 1:46 PM
    • 714 Posts
    • 479 Thanks
    ttoli
    I think if the grandaughter phones the local police and reports it stolen, some civilian with no legal training may record the crime to be investigated. The bike will go on the PNC as stolen and the rider may get stopped, arrested and the bike seized.
    Originally posted by AndyMc.....
    an LOS(Lost or Stolen) marker only goes on PNC once the registered keeper attends police station with copy of V5 and normally has to be within 24 hrs of reporting, as otherwise the system is left open for malicious reports, You'd be surprised just how many people phone up to report but can't be bothered to attend.and of course civilian call handlers are given legal training to enable them to do their job certainly for the MPS it was a month at Hendon and ongoing once on Borough.
    Last edited by ttoli; 07-08-2018 at 1:52 PM.
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