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  • FIRST POST
    • Cotta
    • By Cotta 6th Aug 18, 11:30 AM
    • 3,162Posts
    • 1,542Thanks
    Cotta
    What do you Consider a Good Age to Live to?
    • #1
    • 6th Aug 18, 11:30 AM
    What do you Consider a Good Age to Live to? 6th Aug 18 at 11:30 AM
    Hi All,

    Obviously this question is subject to the person having good or at least reasonable health but what age would you be happy to reach?
Page 2
    • Fireflyaway
    • By Fireflyaway 6th Aug 18, 8:19 PM
    • 2,107 Posts
    • 2,445 Thanks
    Fireflyaway
    I'd like to get into my 90's because there is so much to accomplish and I'm a slow starter! I'm 39 and still renting and have debts..... I figure by 50 I might have become responsible so living to 90 gives me 40 years of enjoyment. Only if I'm happy and healthy though.
    • jimbo747
    • By jimbo747 6th Aug 18, 8:57 PM
    • 589 Posts
    • 1,593 Thanks
    jimbo747
    I'm late 30's, relatively fit but have had testicular cancer and chemo already so doubt I'll be around at 90. Fine by me, I think the UK will be sadly unrecognisable by then and I've had a hell of a lot of fun in life so far. Lovely house, lovely kids, lovely wife, no money worries and an amazing job that makes me feel like I'm making a difference in the world.

    I'm on track to retire at 45, or at least just work if I want to and just spend time with my family, spend more time on my astronomy, chess, DIY, caravanning, biking, flying hobbies, always said I'd go out in a fireball at 60. Hire a Ferrari, skip the damage waiver, and then fly off the cliffs of Dover. If there's anything left of me id donate my remaining bollock as a final middle finger to the world.
    • barnaclebill
    • By barnaclebill 6th Aug 18, 9:54 PM
    • 282 Posts
    • 155 Thanks
    barnaclebill
    My mother was an identical twin, her sister married a CEO and had a big social life, lots of social drinking and smoking players full strength, she went with throat cancer at 73 but my mother light drinker and smoked filter tips went with cancer at 82. My father was a heavy smoker but stopped when 56 he went with cancer at 72.
    I am 72 now but have never smoked except all the secondary I must have had when young, I had a scan this year but all was ok except for the astbestos scars from when I worked in the shipyard.
    I hope to reach 80 and try to keep fit, my uncle had a good job, retired at 60 on the Friday, helped working on the church on Sunday and died that night, never got to draw one day of his pension.
    • Deep In Debt
    • By Deep In Debt 6th Aug 18, 10:07 PM
    • 8,245 Posts
    • 13,014 Thanks
    Deep In Debt
    I'm in my early 50's and reasonably healthy so I hope to have a few good years yet. I'd like to retire before I'm 60 and enjoy a bit of life whilst I still have my health.



    My uncles on my dad's side all lived in to their mid 90's and all still living at home independently. Sadly my dad had an illness most of his life which meant he passed at only 75.



    My mum is going to be 85 next month and she is as fit as a fiddle both physically and mentally and my uncle will be 87 and still fit and living on his own and regularly goes traveling abroad.



    A neighbour of mine is 83 and just given up smoking after nearly 60 years of heavy smoking. She's done well to get this far.
    Debt 30k in 2008. Cleared all my debt in 2013 and loving being debt free
    Mortgage free since 2014
    • SingleSue
    • By SingleSue 7th Aug 18, 7:05 AM
    • 10,395 Posts
    • 58,816 Thanks
    SingleSue
    I'm 48, myriad of health issues, wheelchair user, get trapped in my home at times and struggle to do everyday things pretty much all the time. Quality of life is not what I would like or what it was but I can still enjoy things (going to gigs etc) from time to time.

    Not ready to go yet..although there was a point last winter when that feeling was challenged.
    We made it! One graduated, 2 currently at university, been hard work but it shows there is a possibility of a chance of normal (ish) life after a diagnosis (or two) of ASD. It's not been the easiest route but I am so glad I ignored everything and everyone and did my own therapies with them.
    Eldests' EDS diagnosis 4.5.10, mine 13.1.11 eekk!
    • OldMusicGuy
    • By OldMusicGuy 7th Aug 18, 2:52 PM
    • 679 Posts
    • 1,428 Thanks
    OldMusicGuy
    I'm 61 and am shooting for 100! My FiL is 92 and has a pretty reasonable quality of life, and has at least a few years left in him. I live a healthier lifestyle than he ever has so I am hoping I can get past him.

    Mind you, my dad died at 62 from leukaemia and my mum in her early 70s from smoking-related heart problems. So there is not a history of longevity on my side of the family, I am hoping to change that. I am not a smoker btw.
    • Tabbytabitha
    • By Tabbytabitha 7th Aug 18, 3:34 PM
    • 4,383 Posts
    • 6,976 Thanks
    Tabbytabitha
    Late 70s will do me - about 10 years to go!
    • Alikay
    • By Alikay 7th Aug 18, 3:58 PM
    • 4,842 Posts
    • 13,061 Thanks
    Alikay
    I've known a lot of people who've been very good physically and mentally at 80, but have declined greatly by 85. There have been a few exceptions of course (mum's neighbour who was still incredibly independent until she suddenly died at 106) but I've found it to be the general rule, hence would choose to live until late 70's/early 80's.
    • suejb2
    • By suejb2 7th Aug 18, 5:02 PM
    • 1,464 Posts
    • 2,243 Thanks
    suejb2
    Life
    To quote my Home Economics teacher Mrs Renwick " Quality over quantity ." She was talking about scones at the time but the principle works in life I suppose.

    As long as I am having, what I consider to be a good/ great quality of later years then the older the better.
    Life is like a bath, the longer you are in it the more wrinkly you become.
    • motorguy
    • By motorguy 8th Aug 18, 1:44 PM
    • 18,017 Posts
    • 11,024 Thanks
    motorguy
    When my grandmother was 73 she asked her doctor what the secret to a long life was and he told her it was to walk a mile a day.

    Shes 82 now and we've no idea where she is.
    "We have normality. I repeat, we have normality. Anything you still can't cope with is therefore your own problem."
    • Red-Squirrel
    • By Red-Squirrel 8th Aug 18, 2:40 PM
    • 3,842 Posts
    • 10,358 Thanks
    Red-Squirrel
    When my grandmother was 73 she asked her doctor what the secret to a long life was and he told her it was to walk a mile a day.

    Shes 82 now and we've no idea where she is.
    Originally posted by motorguy
    I chuckled.
    • fairy lights
    • By fairy lights 8th Aug 18, 3:40 PM
    • 8,637 Posts
    • 28,770 Thanks
    fairy lights
    70 healthy, fun filled years seems like plenty, I'd rather that than spend another 20 years with declining health and mobility and loss of independence - but I'm 30 now, I imagine when I get in to my 60's 70 won't seem nearly so long.
    • Red-Squirrel
    • By Red-Squirrel 8th Aug 18, 3:59 PM
    • 3,842 Posts
    • 10,358 Thanks
    Red-Squirrel
    70 healthy, fun filled years seems like plenty, I'd rather that than spend another 20 years with declining health and mobility and loss of independence - but I'm 30 now, I imagine when I get in to my 60's 70 won't seem nearly so long.
    Originally posted by fairy lights
    70 probably wonít even be retirement age by the time you get there! The average 70 year old isnít struggling with mobility or serious health issues these days, itís late middle age rather than old age these days.
    • lincroft1710
    • By lincroft1710 8th Aug 18, 9:09 PM
    • 11,273 Posts
    • 9,642 Thanks
    lincroft1710
    70 probably wonít even be retirement age by the time you get there! The average 70 year old isnít struggling with mobility or serious health issues these days, itís late middle age rather than old age these days.
    Originally posted by Red-Squirrel
    Obviously I'm not average even though I'm still late 60s, but have osteoarthritis, scar tissue on one lung and one or two other problems! Quite a few former fellow school pupils failed to reach 70.
    • Primrose
    • By Primrose 8th Aug 18, 9:28 PM
    • 8,452 Posts
    • 29,699 Thanks
    Primrose
    My parents both lived to their early nineties but their latter years weren,t much fun. I'd love the day to come when when it would become legal to be able to choose the timing of your own departure. I think it's worrying about how one will cope with serious illness, disability or dementia that ruins old age for a lot of people. If that fear could be taken away people might enjoy their last year's more.

    Meanwhile I'd do scan the obituary columns from time to time and scare myself if too many people younger than me have died !
    • Red-Squirrel
    • By Red-Squirrel 9th Aug 18, 9:54 PM
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    Red-Squirrel
    Obviously I'm not average even though I'm still late 60s, but have osteoarthritis, scar tissue on one lung and one or two other problems! Quite a few former fellow school pupils failed to reach 70.
    Originally posted by lincroft1710
    Several people I went to school with didn!!!8217;t reach 30, including one close friend who barely made it into adulthood tragically. Others are living with chronic conditions that have a big impact on their quality of life well before hitting 40. Sadly this will always be the case, bad luck will never go away.

    There is still a big difference between an average 70 year old today and an average 70 year old 30 or 50 years ago though. My retirement age is currently 68 I think and I fully expect that to go up. I actually like my job but I!!!8217;d still hope for a fair few years of retirement to behave badly and get away with it!
    • GaleSF63
    • By GaleSF63 10th Aug 18, 2:03 AM
    • 295 Posts
    • 419 Thanks
    GaleSF63
    Someone I used to work with was of the strong opinion that we should all be put down when we reach 70. This was about 25 years ago and she was early forties so she will be around 67/68 now. I wonder if she still thinks the same!
    • seven-day-weekend
    • By seven-day-weekend 10th Aug 18, 2:40 AM
    • 31,552 Posts
    • 60,981 Thanks
    seven-day-weekend
    70 probably won!!!8217;t even be retirement age by the time you get there! The average 70 year old isn!!!8217;t struggling with mobility or serious health issues these days, it!!!8217;s late middle age rather than old age these days.
    Originally posted by Red-Squirrel
    I agree.

    In January my husband will be 70 and I will be 69 and we have just bought a beautiful cruiser motorbike to take us to Spain and France. We do not consider ourselves old.

    How long would I like to live? As long as possible, assuming good health.
    Member #10 of £2 savers club
    Imagine someone holding forth on biology whose only knowledge of the subject is the Book of British Birds, and you have a rough idea of what it feels like to read Richard Dawkins on theology: Terry Eagleton
    • moneyistooshorttomention
    • By moneyistooshorttomention 10th Aug 18, 8:42 AM
    • 17,418 Posts
    • 48,399 Thanks
    moneyistooshorttomention
    Either until:
    - the day before I came down with any serious illness (and I count things like arthritis and angina as "serious illness")

    OR

    - no later than my 90th birthday (whatever my health and finances are like).

    Even as someone in my 60's I find there's been one heck of a lot of change to my society in my time. Some of it has been good (eg wider range of food available and women are noticeably more equal than we were).

    Much of the change has been bad (g.m. food/overpopulation & loadsa building because of it/fracking/the rise of Nationalist movements in our country - which I do rather feel is connected to overpopulation, ie "all those extra people - keep out of our part of the country"??/cutbacks).

    On balance I'd say there has been a lot more change for "the worse" than there has been for "the better". I don't want to see that much more of change for "the worse" and I'm starting to become conscious of contemporaries devoping chronic illnesses and that most of them will probably die before I do (though I have a policy of being friendly with all agegroups anyway).

    Quite definitely my definition of retirement is "doing whatever I decide to" and I don't expect my body to restrict me in any way from that and I wouldnt put up with it doing so personally. Yep...just started another new-to-me form of dance and was duly shattered for the rest of that day - but just started reading a book on dealing with energy problems and will see what can be done to rectify that and do so.
    If you feel like you don't fit in in this world, it's because you are here to help create a new one.
    • Tabbytabitha
    • By Tabbytabitha 10th Aug 18, 9:56 AM
    • 4,383 Posts
    • 6,976 Thanks
    Tabbytabitha
    70 probably won!!!8217;t even be retirement age by the time you get there! The average 70 year old isn!!!8217;t struggling with mobility or serious health issues these days, it!!!8217;s late middle age rather than old age these days.
    Originally posted by Red-Squirrel
    It really isn't - 70 is old and we shouldn't be afraid to say so.
    There's nothing wrong with being old and it shouldn't stop us doing whatever we want, dressing the way we want or being the sort of people we've always been but don't let "late middle age" become a euphemism for being old. There's no need for a euphemism, age is an achievement and not something to apologise for.
    Last edited by Tabbytabitha; 10-08-2018 at 10:03 AM.
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