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  • FIRST POST
    • AndrewAfresh2
    • By AndrewAfresh2 5th Aug 18, 9:28 PM
    • 6Posts
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    AndrewAfresh2
    Need to make good shelf holes on home sale?
    • #1
    • 5th Aug 18, 9:28 PM
    Need to make good shelf holes on home sale? 5th Aug 18 at 9:28 PM
    I'm completing on my first home sale soon and told the removal firm rep that I will take my shelves, which are fixed to the walls. She told me I will need to fill & paint the ensuing holes, otherwise I am breaching the sale contract. Is she right? Thank you for any helpful replies
Page 2
    • NaughtiusMaximus
    • By NaughtiusMaximus 6th Aug 18, 10:49 AM
    • 902 Posts
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    NaughtiusMaximus
    I would be careful here, things that are attached to the wall (as well as things like carpets and curtains) are usually considered in fixtures and fittings which are included in the sale unless otherwise negotiated.
    Originally posted by exiled_red
    As long as the vendor is honest when completing the TA10 there's no problems for a legal point of view with taking the carpets, curtains, shelves etc
    • NaughtiusMaximus
    • By NaughtiusMaximus 6th Aug 18, 10:54 AM
    • 902 Posts
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    NaughtiusMaximus
    yes, under the terms of the contract you are expected to make good. However, as others have recounted above, I rather wish my vendor had just left things alone and "made good". When they took their shelves their idea of making good was to partly fill the holes with white mastic and not bother to paint. Getting the mastic out and filling the holes properly before being able to paint was just a waste of my time and theirs in the first place.
    Originally posted by 00ec25
    This is a good point.

    To the OP - you could ask the buyer if they would like you to fill the holes or leave as is. Given the choice I would ask they be left for me to do, filling screw holes is a simple DIY job but something some people still manage to screw up.
    • cjdavies
    • By cjdavies 6th Aug 18, 11:07 AM
    • 3,443 Posts
    • 3,686 Thanks
    cjdavies
    I would be careful here, things that are attached to the wall (as well as things like carpets and curtains) are usually considered in fixtures and fittings which are included in the sale unless otherwise negotiated.
    Originally posted by exiled_red
    I have a piece of wood attached to a wall that used to part of my tv unit, I took the unit apart and replaced it with a glass on. The piece of wood is still there attached to wall (never bothered to remove), I guess I would have to leave it
    Last edited by cjdavies; 06-08-2018 at 11:10 AM.
    • victoriavictorious
    • By victoriavictorious 7th Aug 18, 10:27 AM
    • 317 Posts
    • 511 Thanks
    victoriavictorious
    The biggest PITA is when shelves or fixtures are removed and the rawlplugs are left behind sticking out of poorly-drilled holes, but can't be just filled in, or pulled out without removing huge lumps of plaster with them, resulting in loads of work for you, including having to completely repaint the wall (or entire room so it all matches.)
    • Grenage
    • By Grenage 7th Aug 18, 12:27 PM
    • 1,501 Posts
    • 1,423 Thanks
    Grenage
    Let's face it; it's five minutes of filler and a quick sand - the new people are going to paint the room anyway.


    Our last seller asked if we wanted her to fill holes from picture frames, but I'd rather do it myself.


    If the buyers know you're taking the shelves, then really you might as well spend a couple of minutes pushing some filler into what's left.
    • gingercordial
    • By gingercordial 7th Aug 18, 1:39 PM
    • 1,186 Posts
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    gingercordial
    People asking why sellers would take shelves: perhaps the OP is not talking about individual planks of wood attached to the walls on brackets. I assumed they meant tall freestanding sets of shelves/bookcases which for safety reasons have a bracket at the top which you (ideally) bolt to the wall to stop them falling forward. Fairly standard if you have children who might try to climb them, or even if you just have wobbly floors and/or heavy stuff on the higher shelves, but they are nevertheless the kind of furniture unit you would expect to take with you. All of our bookcases and cupboards have an anchor bolt into the wall at the top. We are renting so will certainly need to make these good when we leave.
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