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  • FIRST POST
    • 02peast
    • By 02peast 5th Aug 18, 1:48 PM
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    02peast
    Local Council Jobs - Starting Salary
    • #1
    • 5th Aug 18, 1:48 PM
    Local Council Jobs - Starting Salary 5th Aug 18 at 1:48 PM
    Hi everyone,

    I hope there's someone out there with a bit of experience in this sector that can help.

    I'm currently working for a national private sector company but I'm looking for something that can give me a better work/life balance (I'm currently salaried and although there's a 9-5 work pattern I'm expected to work however many hours needed to get the job done with no effect on salary, hence the looking for something new).

    I've applied for a job with my local council which (without wanting to sound arrogant) would be a bit of a step down from where I am currently but would give me a better quality of life.

    Looking at the person specification I meet/exceed the essential and desirable attributes so I'm hoping I'm in with a good chance.

    I've been offered an interview in a couple of weeks and I've been doing a bit of calculations around how a drop in salary could affect my bills etc. The job is advertised as a salary range (19.5K - 21.5K). That 2,000 can make a big difference to take home salary so I'm wondering what people's experiences are of starting salaries in local councils and if there's any chance I might be able to start higher than the bottom figure?

    Thanks for your time!
Page 1
    • TELLIT01
    • By TELLIT01 5th Aug 18, 3:20 PM
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    TELLIT01
    • #2
    • 5th Aug 18, 3:20 PM
    • #2
    • 5th Aug 18, 3:20 PM
    Exceeding the requirements for the job won't make any difference in a role at that payband. You are more likely to start at the bottom of the payband than at any other point although there is no harm in asking if you are offered the job.
    • MovingForwards
    • By MovingForwards 5th Aug 18, 3:50 PM
    • 404 Posts
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    MovingForwards
    • #3
    • 5th Aug 18, 3:50 PM
    • #3
    • 5th Aug 18, 3:50 PM
    As far as I am aware you will start at the bottom /lowest figure.

    In situations such as these you need to weigh up is it a longer/shorter commute time, how many holidays/bank holidays per year, what pension % they put in for you, flexi time, the hours you work, work/life balance. Add all of these up and I am sure it's worth more than 2k
    • Smellyonion
    • By Smellyonion 5th Aug 18, 3:53 PM
    • 136 Posts
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    Smellyonion
    • #4
    • 5th Aug 18, 3:53 PM
    • #4
    • 5th Aug 18, 3:53 PM
    Depends how much they want you. they have the discretion to start you anywhere in the band.
    • sangie595
    • By sangie595 5th Aug 18, 4:49 PM
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    sangie595
    • #5
    • 5th Aug 18, 4:49 PM
    • #5
    • 5th Aug 18, 4:49 PM
    Most councils won't increase from the bottom of the scale unless your are already on more and work for an associated employer, such as another council.

    Good luck with that whole work/life balance thing, or the getting paid overtime / not being expected to work more hours. You did do some research about what working for a council is like, not just depend on the popular myths? If you have any desire to progress, they'll be little work / life balance, and plenty of unpaid hours...
    • motorguy
    • By motorguy 5th Aug 18, 6:15 PM
    • 17,598 Posts
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    motorguy
    • #6
    • 5th Aug 18, 6:15 PM
    • #6
    • 5th Aug 18, 6:15 PM
    Most councils won't increase from the bottom of the scale unless your are already on more and work for an associated employer, such as another council.

    Good luck with that whole work/life balance thing, or the getting paid overtime / not being expected to work more hours. You did do some research about what working for a council is like, not just depend on the popular myths? If you have any desire to progress, they'll be little work / life balance, and plenty of unpaid hours...
    Originally posted by sangie595
    +1

    I'm a contractor in a council and thats wholly what i'm seeing. Theres a small percentage who work hard, go way above and beyond and progress slowly (and are still paid significantly below private sector market rates), the rest just get their small yearly increment and stay on the same grade year after year after year.....
    "We have normality. I repeat, we have normality. Anything you still can't cope with is therefore your own problem."
    • keepcalmandstayoutofdebt
    • By keepcalmandstayoutofdebt 5th Aug 18, 7:25 PM
    • 3,382 Posts
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    keepcalmandstayoutofdebt
    • #7
    • 5th Aug 18, 7:25 PM
    • #7
    • 5th Aug 18, 7:25 PM
    Should have done a search was searching for something else and ironically this old thread popped up
    https://forums.moneysavingexpert.com/showthread.php?t=4661693

    Admittedly bit out of date and would seem the poster didn't stay in the Council job to long, even 5 years ago ...perhaps they could well echo the above experience pointed out...

    Personally the last very, very, very well paid job I interviewed for at 24,500 (private sector, large corp, fully backed by a recruitment agent and it's umbrella co. dare I say!!) turned out was actually rather temp to perm for a reason...

    I never look at a job now without the likes of this godsend!
    https://wageindicator.co.uk/pay/hourly-pay-converter
    "If you are caught in a rainstorm, once you accept that you'll receive a soaking, the only thing left to do is enjoy the walk"
    • Silvertabby
    • By Silvertabby 5th Aug 18, 7:52 PM
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    Silvertabby
    • #8
    • 5th Aug 18, 7:52 PM
    • #8
    • 5th Aug 18, 7:52 PM
    Don't just look at the salary (for what it's worth, I agree with the others who say that you would start on the bottom band - end of) look at the pension benefits as well.

    Your own pension contributions would be 5.8% of your 19.5K salary - but your employer will pay considerably more.

    So, you would pay 904.80 per annum (1,131 before tax relief).

    In return, you would get 19.5K / 49 = 397.96 (plus CPI revaluation) as an annual pension for the rest of your life.

    Multiply by number of years service.
    • j s m
    • By j s m 6th Aug 18, 12:05 AM
    • 5 Posts
    • 7 Thanks
    j s m
    • #9
    • 6th Aug 18, 12:05 AM
    • #9
    • 6th Aug 18, 12:05 AM
    As far as I am aware you will start at the bottom /lowest figure.

    In situations such as these you need to weigh up is it a longer/shorter commute time, how many holidays/bank holidays per year, what pension % they put in for you, flexi time, the hours you work, work/life balance. Add all of these up and I am sure it's worth more than 2k
    Originally posted by MovingForwards
    +1 for this

    I work in the public sector and you cannot get a pay rise whilst in that role, and it is extremely difficult to get above the base salary when interviewing - it is basically your only chance to barter.

    You could go for line management allowance to bolster your salary, which is popular in local councils, but extremely difficult to do because everyone does it
    • sangie595
    • By sangie595 6th Aug 18, 10:05 AM
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    sangie595
    +1 for this

    I work in the public sector and you cannot get a pay rise whilst in that role, and it is extremely difficult to get above the base salary when interviewing - it is basically your only chance to barter.

    You could go for line management allowance to bolster your salary, which is popular in local councils, but extremely difficult to do because everyone does it
    Originally posted by j s m
    What line management allowance? If this exists at all, it's a very localised thing. I've never heard of it in over 30 years of working with councils. So, far from everyone doing it, I don't know anyone who does it.
    • TELLIT01
    • By TELLIT01 6th Aug 18, 12:21 PM
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    TELLIT01
    What line management allowance? If this exists at all, it's a very localised thing. I've never heard of it in over 30 years of working with councils. So, far from everyone doing it, I don't know anyone who does it.
    Originally posted by sangie595

    Possibly referring to TDA which if memory serves stands for Temporary Duties Allowance. When somebody takes over the duties of a higher grade this used to be payable immediately. I'm aware that some areas tried to get away with only paying it if the role was covered for a week or more. Where I worked they had to back down when nobody would take on the higher grade roles. What did management expect??
    • StaffieTerrier
    • By StaffieTerrier 6th Aug 18, 12:41 PM
    • 335 Posts
    • 563 Thanks
    StaffieTerrier
    What line management allowance? If this exists at all, it's a very localised thing. I've never heard of it in over 30 years of working with councils. So, far from everyone doing it, I don't know anyone who does it.
    Originally posted by sangie595
    We have a responsibility allowance but it's only temporary. It's used for someone to take on extra duties while either someone extra is recruited or the person with the allowance goes through a regrading process. It can be claimed for a maximum of 12 months.

    I had it for 6 months last year when my line manager left, while they decided how they were going to replace him.
    • sangie595
    • By sangie595 6th Aug 18, 1:12 PM
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    sangie595
    Yes, but an allowance for temporary duties (which is part of national conditions) isn't going to be given to someone starting a job which is what jsm suggested. Interestingly as well, we are in the process of negotiating reductions in these. In some areas they are now very rare. For good reason. They are intended to be temporary to cover specific business requirements whilst permanant solutions, such as recruitment, are put in place. What has actually been happening had been that people have ended up on them for years! Sometimes so that the employer doesn't have to pay out the rate for the job, sometimes through inaction, and sometimes so that they can promote someone without actually having a recruitment process. So in many places we now have a maximum period they are allowed for, and can only be authorised with a business case. Our view is that if a position is available people should have the chance to compete for it.
    • Fireflyaway
    • By Fireflyaway 6th Aug 18, 8:40 PM
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    Fireflyaway
    I have worked for 2 councils, district and county. Both had a policy to pay whatever the bottom of the band was, no matter what the person's experience of previous salary. However subject to satisfactory performance there was an incremental increase annually on top of any cost of living allowance. Not many companies will give you 2 pay rises a year.
    I recently left a job ( with a council actually!) that paid 10k a year more than I'm on now. Best decision I could have made. Sure the old job paid well but I was miserable. I'm now happy to go to work. I sleep well, I'm motivated and life is good. So long as you can pay your bills go for it! Happiness is important. Your salary will probably go up in time anyway.
    • TELLIT01
    • By TELLIT01 7th Aug 18, 1:10 PM
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    TELLIT01
    Yes, but an allowance for temporary duties ....
    They are intended to be temporary to cover specific business requirements whilst permanant solutions, such as recruitment, are put in place.
    Originally posted by sangie595

    That certainly wasn't the only way TDA was used where I worked in DWP. It was used to cover holiday or sickness absence as well. As I mentioned in the previous post, they tried to limit it to situations where higher grade work was being covered for a week or more but quickly discovered that nobody would take on the added responsibilities without being paid. The responsibility then fell on the manager of the absent individual, many of whom didn't have any idea how to do the job.
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