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  • FIRST POST
    • yogi_brrr
    • By yogi_brrr 18th Jul 18, 11:39 AM
    • 75Posts
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    yogi_brrr
    How are your tomatoes doing ?
    • #1
    • 18th Jul 18, 11:39 AM
    How are your tomatoes doing ? 18th Jul 18 at 11:39 AM
    ...And how long should it take for tomatoes to get ripe on the vine? My biggest tomato (Gardener's delight) finished growing over 2 weeks ago but is still rock hard and totally green. It's outside.
    Has the recent heatwave made any difference to your tomatoes. I am in the East Midlands and we have had very warm weather - about 30 degrees. Maybe it's too hot?
Page 4
    • malebolge
    • By malebolge 31st Jul 18, 11:22 AM
    • 476 Posts
    • 829 Thanks
    malebolge
    Salvage? Take a cutting?

    A few years ago I took cuttings of toms in July or August, then grew them on to have tomatoes in our then ramshackle and leaky conservatory on Christmas Day.

    As I recall, they carried on well into January, maybe almost February, before succumbing to the low temperatures/botrytis.
    Originally posted by Davesnave
    Last year I had a nightmare with tomatoes - ended up, over half came from side shoots I rooted in water after dad came round and tried to be helpful. He put weedkiller on most of my plants. Thought he was helping, bless.

    The cuttings fruited later, of course, but they produced more tomatoes than I expected. I've a glut this year, but you've reminded me and I'm going to take some cuttings to put in the conservatory for winter toms
    • unrecordings
    • By unrecordings 1st Aug 18, 7:51 PM
    • 417 Posts
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    unrecordings
    Hard green areas on the ‘shoulder’ of the fruit: This is known as greenback. These areas remain hard and unpalatable as the rest of the fruit ripens.
    Originally posted by peter_the_piper
    I do believe I might have Hard Back this year. The Ailsa Craig usually ripen evenly all over, but this year there's a still green at the top of the fruit - which may or may not ripen up. It's going to be a game of chicken with the first few to see if they ripen up properly or just start to rot if I leave it too late
    • Living proof
    • By Living proof 2nd Aug 18, 11:08 AM
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    Living proof
    I have just frozen about 100 cherry or small tomatoes - I can't keep up with them outside. The greenhouse still not faring so well with a little blossom end rot on the largest ones. Can you cut that out and use the rest?
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    • Primrose
    • By Primrose 2nd Aug 18, 11:54 AM
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    Primrose
    Im also freezing lots of my small tumbling tomatoes. They're small enough to freeze whole and are useful for winter soups and casseroles.

    On the blossom end rot fruits it all depends in how ripe they are. I have used some affected by this in the past if they're pretty ripe but you really have to cut the bad ends off and just taste and see. If the good bits taste ok use them up quickly or freeze them in some form immediately. To be honest it can depend on how abundant my crop is. If I have a good crop you can afford to throw away the odd damaged one. If it,s sparse you feel to have to save as much as possible.
    • unrecordings
    • By unrecordings 3rd Aug 18, 9:50 PM
    • 417 Posts
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    unrecordings
    I have just frozen about 100 cherry or small tomatoes - I can't keep up with them outside. The greenhouse still not faring so well with a little blossom end rot on the largest ones. Can you cut that out and use the rest?
    Originally posted by Living proof
    Yep - Cut one and see. It's best to get them while they're a little bit orange otherwise when they fully ripen they just begin to rot proper

    Just slice them a little above the rot and you should be left with a good bit. If they've fully ripened and gone sloshy, then bin em'
    • unrecordings
    • By unrecordings 3rd Aug 18, 9:54 PM
    • 417 Posts
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    unrecordings
    My Ailsa Craig have started to split now ***
    I'm sure I've been watering enough, and these are in growpots
    Ho hum

    *** Been one of those days today, too hot, and then Dearly Beloved broke the handle on my favourite Haws watering can that they don't make anymore (although two carefully selected bits of bamboo and some expertly applied gaffa tape fixed it)
    Last edited by unrecordings; 03-08-2018 at 9:56 PM. Reason: poor typing yet again
    • Primrose
    • By Primrose 4th Aug 18, 7:25 AM
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    Primrose
    I'm rejoicing at the sight of nice red tomatoes appearing on my outdoor plants now which are positively laden with fruit this year whilst praying for rain to reduce the need for constant watering.


    At the same time I'm dread the effect the rain could have, i.e. bring unwanted humidity which will doubtless trigger the dreaded blight at the very worst possible time.


    Some of my tumbling fruits are starting to split now. I think the combination of heat and watering is too much for them so I'm freezing them whole or eating them quickly. I know some people recommend removing some of the lower tomato leaves from the plants to help them ripen but in this weather that hardly seems necessary and in actual fact I think theyre probably better left on the plants to give the fruit a little shade and prevent them from slowly cooking in the sun's rays..
    • tootallulah
    • By tootallulah 5th Aug 18, 8:34 PM
    • 2,172 Posts
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    tootallulah
    Hehe! I bet it was! What variety are you growing? I also have tonnes of blooms and tiny baby tomatoes. They pretty much all got pollinated. Maybe that's the issue. The plants are struggling to support all this new growth...
    Originally posted by yogi_brrr
    I am growing Floridity, Tigerella, Sungold, Chocolate, Russian Blacks, Tomato Berry, Black Krim, San Morenzo.

    4 of us neighbours all grow different types and then we do a big swap between us. I love the taste of Floridity so have about 6 of those and I grew Tomato Berry so have 4 of those, 2 of all of the others and most are outdoors on a south facing wall. Obviously this year even the big varieties are ripening well.

    Most years I have enough in the freezer to see me through until February/March by which point I am ready to begin growing again. Every year I grow a variety I haven't grown before this year it is Tomato Berry - good taste, small heart shaped fruits, dark red. I am not sure what it is about growing tomatoes, is it only in England? I don't think it saves a penny but the taste is wonderful.
    Mortgage House £45,000, 26 January 2018, 17th September 2018 £1,000.
    • skogar
    • By skogar 5th Aug 18, 9:27 PM
    • 157 Posts
    • 751 Thanks
    skogar
    1st year growing tomatoes, outside as no greenhouse. I didn't really expect it to work. Tomatoes are red alert and 2 types suitable for hanging baskets losetto and 1 that I've forgotten the name of. The red alert was supposed to be a bush tomato but because it didn't seem to support itself was tied to a cane as were the ones that I originally intended to plant in hanging baskets. I didn't really know what Ielse should be done as I wasn't expecting to grow them as cordons. I've had some splitting - it's a struggle to keep up with the watering especially when away for the weekend but the tomatoes seem to be doing well and we've had a reasonable number off so far and plenty still to ripen. The problem is that this year has been so atypical I have no idea if I will be able t get tomatoes to grow outside next year or not. if anyone could give me some basic tips for next year it would be much appreciated as this year has been a bit haphazard. Are you supposed to do anything with bush tomatoes to make them grow more bushy or is it common to have to stake them?
    • Primrose
    • By Primrose 6th Aug 18, 9:18 AM
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    Primrose
    I grow both cordons and bush/tumbling tomatoes. The bush/tumblers are tumbling red and Tumbling yellow and always growi successfully outdoors (we're in the south east.).

    The tumblers I grow in deep patio pots don,t need staking but sometimes once the fruit starts to appear some of the branches do need propping up with thick twiggy sticks to stop the weight of fruit splitting them off from the parent stem.

    I grew Losetto one year in a border. It had lots of tiny fruits but I would have regarded it as too sprawling for a hanging basket and again think it would be more suitable for a deep patio pot where some branches could be propped up if necessary.

    None of my tumbling/bush plants grow more than two feet tall.
    • Farway
    • By Farway 6th Aug 18, 2:20 PM
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    Farway
    I found the bush/ tumbling type mostly need some sort of support, and to be fair, some catalogues do say this for certain varieties.

    I found Losetto sprawling, and IMO not worth the effort, except for maybe if you like tiny toms as decoration in a salad

    I no longer grow the bush type, too sprawling for me

    I now grow cordon because I know where I am with them, or my trusty Balcony Yellow, which I find is suitable for my wall / hanging baskets. I think some seed catalogues are to blame for misleading descriptions, and judicious Photoshopping, giving the impression you can get 40 pounds of fruit by growing "Supersweetredtom" in a thimble
    • MRSTITTLEMOUSE
    • By MRSTITTLEMOUSE 7th Aug 18, 12:04 AM
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    MRSTITTLEMOUSE
    I get blight. I tried once to grow tomatoes outdoors, got the makings of a really good crop then the blight hit them really bad - didn't get a single useable tomato from the outdoor plants. Fortunately I'd still got my greenhouse crop, so in the general scheme of things it wasn't anything like a disaster
    Originally posted by unrecordings
    I'm in Newcastle and strangely I get better crops outdoor than I do in the greenhouse albeit later. This year my outdoor tomatoes are coming on a storm, loads of healthy fruit. My greenhouse ones are producing huge trusses but around half have developed blossom rot. Same happened last year. Tried various remedies and precautions but it still appears. Any tips.
    • unrecordings
    • By unrecordings 7th Aug 18, 8:42 AM
    • 417 Posts
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    unrecordings
    I seem to always get blossom end rot at the start of the season then it tapers out on fruit that develops later in the season. It seems to be variety specific - it always happens on my Alicante, but very little if any on my Ailsa Craig

    You can still use them though - pick them early while they're still orange, or cook with them (cutting the bad bit off obviously). I made a curry yesterday using mainly tomatoes with blossom end rot and a couple that had split - it was well over a tins worth
    • sam.4000
    • By sam.4000 7th Aug 18, 9:32 AM
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    sam.4000
    My tomatoes were doing really well since middle of July always different cherry tomatoes as I prefer them including us gold. However I have blight for the first time ever in growing tomatoes in the last 12 years. I have yanked the first 2 plant out but all have got it ( 12 tomato plants). I am just wondering whether this is the end of growing tomatoes for me? I will bin all the support sticks to prevent contamination for next year but have a feeling that I will look at blight resistant tomatoes for next year Has any got any recommendations?
    • Farway
    • By Farway 7th Aug 18, 2:52 PM
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    Farway
    My tomatoes were doing really well since middle of July always different cherry tomatoes as I prefer them including us gold. However I have blight for the first time ever in growing tomatoes in the last 12 years. I have yanked the first 2 plant out but all have got it ( 12 tomato plants). I am just wondering whether this is the end of growing tomatoes for me? I will bin all the support sticks to prevent contamination for next year but have a feeling that I will look at blight resistant tomatoes for next year Has any got any recommendations?
    Originally posted by sam.4000

    Were they inside or out?


    Blight arrives on the wind and thrives in hot & humid conditions, were known as "Smith periods" but like most things horticultural are now Hutton criteria, about which I know nothing except from here https://www.hortweek.com/new-criteria-replace-smith-periods-potato-blight-forecasting/fresh-produce/article/1418388


    The point I'm getting to is no matter what you personally do, the spores from your neighbour 5 streets, or next county, away will still get you outdoors


    I've tried some of the blight resistant, not really much better. I now grow in my conservatory, with a few spares outside on the off chance, so far I OK outside
    • sam.4000
    • By sam.4000 8th Aug 18, 10:55 PM
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    sam.4000
    Were they inside or out?


    Blight arrives on the wind and thrives in hot & humid conditions, were known as "Smith periods" but like most things horticultural are now Hutton criteria, about which I know nothing except from here https://www.hortweek.com/new-criteria-replace-smith-periods-potato-blight-forecasting/fresh-produce/article/1418388


    The point I'm getting to is no matter what you personally do, the spores from your neighbour 5 streets, or next county, away will still get you outdoors


    I've tried some of the blight resistant, not really much better. I now grow in my conservatory, with a few spares outside on the off chance, so far I OK outside
    Originally posted by Farway
    They were grown outside and always have. Such a shame to have been lucky for over 10 years growing tomatoes without blight. I am wondering whether the hot summer and evening watering has not helped this year. I don't have a conservatory or greenhouse or will I. I will see how next year goes and if I get it again I will stop growing them. Thank you for your response.
    • Primrose
    • By Primrose 9th Aug 18, 8:42 AM
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    Primrose
    Blight is the most dreaded disease for all tomato growers. Over the years I,ve used a belt and braces approach, as I dont have a greenhouse and grow mine outdoors. However Im growing a combination of bush/tumbling varieties and cordons and start my tumbling varieties (tumbling Tom red and yellow) very early and Plant them out under individual cloches.

    This means they fruit and ripen much earlier than the cordon varieties and I'm always sure to get a crop before blight tends to strike.

    For my cordons I grow a varieties of types but these days at least 50% of my crop are Ferline which are supposed to be blight resistant. They,re an F1 variety which means the anti blight characteristics don,t necessarily come true to type the following year if yiu save some seed but I still sow a few of them and keep my fingers crossed. I have to say though, there isnt a truly blight resistant vanity.

    After this year,a hot weather I,m expecting blight warning soon and will be covering my outdoor plants with fleece if I get a warning . Not sure it will make any difference though. One can only try !
    Last edited by Primrose; 09-08-2018 at 9:14 AM.
    • Farway
    • By Farway 9th Aug 18, 2:50 PM
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    Farway
    Update on my Harzfeuer toms. I reported earlier they were OK, but now they have really ripened on the vine I can upgrade the taste to very nice, will grow again.

    Beats my Gardener's Delight easily.



    I read somewhere they are blight resistant, but can't vouch on that claim
    One other plus, seed is cheap & available in Lidl, which is where mine came from, they are F1 so saving seed is probably not good idea when the packeted F1 seed is cheap anyway
    • Blackjack Davy
    • By Blackjack Davy 12th Aug 18, 2:32 PM
    • 509 Posts
    • 272 Thanks
    Blackjack Davy
    ...And how long should it take for tomatoes to get ripe on the vine? My biggest tomato (Gardener's delight) finished growing over 2 weeks ago but is still rock hard and totally green. It's outside.
    Has the recent heatwave made any difference to your tomatoes. I am in the East Midlands and we have had very warm weather - about 30 degrees. Maybe it's too hot?
    Originally posted by yogi_brrr
    The ones in the greenhouse have had split/cracked skins for the first time ever, its the extreme weather this summer they've definitely suffered.

    The oudoor ones (gardeners delight) have been great been picking them for weeks. Been feeding and watering regularly though and they're still growing (need to pinch the tops out infact).

    n.b. no blight yet but with this recent wet weather it'll probably arrive sooner or later its just a matter of time (the greenhouse ones never get it but they're watered from the base only, the leaves never get wet its rain/water on the leaves that spread the spores)
    Last edited by Blackjack Davy; 12-08-2018 at 2:37 PM.
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    • Living proof
    • By Living proof 12th Aug 18, 3:36 PM
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    Living proof
    My tumblers outside on the decking are beginning to flag unsurprisingly and today I picked just 83 small fruits, whereas last week it was up to 200. There aren't that many green ones now so I have seen the best of it. Normally they are in the greenhouse but in the hot weather they took off at such a rate I had to take them out as I could hardly move for them hanging all over the place.

    I have had to leave the greenhouse for a while as a young sparrow has come in through the automatic windows and is very flustered. The tomatoes can wait another hour or so until it eventually finds the open door. I am freezing all the fruits although I did dry three trays earlier in the week but the skins were awfully tough so I don't think it's the best use of the cherry varieties.

    A further 38 mixed fruit from the greenhouse now the sparrow has escaped. The plants are all looking a bit weary and the allotment ones, although much later to fruit, seem a lot healthier now. I won't be short of tomatoes over the next few months anyway.
    Last edited by Living proof; 12-08-2018 at 4:42 PM.
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