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    • OnlyGuyWhoLikesTwix
    • By OnlyGuyWhoLikesTwix 13th Jul 18, 3:19 PM
    • 20Posts
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    OnlyGuyWhoLikesTwix
    Issue with neighbour and garbage
    • #1
    • 13th Jul 18, 3:19 PM
    Issue with neighbour and garbage 13th Jul 18 at 3:19 PM
    I am having an issue with my neighbour. Not to pass judgement as I am totally unaware of the person's circumstances but they often appear drunk and as far as I know don't work. I have no idea if the house is rented, owned or anything else.

    If you look at the front of my house, there are three parking spaces next to it (separated by an alley way). The driveways look onto the garden spaces of the properties just around the corner of the road. So as you turn into my road, you will see the side of the house on the corner, their garden, three driveway spaces and my house.

    The driveway to the left is owned by me, the driveway to the right is owned by the corner neighbour. The neighbour next door to the corner owns the middle driveway.

    Since I moved in there has been a large-ish bag of household junk that he has just left there. It never really bothered me other than being an eyesore. However now an absolute shed-load of rubble has appeared taking up the entire central driveway. It's been a couple of months since all the rubble appeared. From what I could see, the rubble appeared when he had some workmen working on his garden. What they were doing, I really don't know. But the rubble has now been left there with an assortment of rusty tools which don't look much good to me.

    It does not encroach on my driveway, however my issue is this is making the whole place look terrible. Added to that, I now think that a family of rats are now living in the rubble as I have seen a couple around appearing to come from the rubble.

    I have reported the possible rat infestation to the council, in fairness it was only today so I've not had a response yet. I assume that they will come to take a look at some point.

    My main question is, what action can I take to have the council get involved and ask the neighbour to take care of this mess? I don't want to create bad feelings but it's getting on my nerves now. I don't really like bringing people to my home only to see the rubble from building works planted right next to me. I've never had to report a neighbour like this before and I really don't know how to do so. Added to that, I really don't want to get fobbed off with, "It's private property, tough cookies we won't do anything!"

    Any help?
    Mortgage when started: 186500 (2 year fixed when taken out in 2016)
    Current mortgage (13/03/2018): 146,922.15 (5yr fixed 2.39% + 10% overpayment limit)
    Mortgage free day: 0?/0?/2025
Page 1
    • missile
    • By missile 13th Jul 18, 3:31 PM
    • 9,529 Posts
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    missile
    • #2
    • 13th Jul 18, 3:31 PM
    • #2
    • 13th Jul 18, 3:31 PM
    Have you approached the neighbour?
    "A nation's greatness is measured by how it treats its weakest members." ~ Mahatma Gandhi
    Ride hard or stay home
    • OnlyGuyWhoLikesTwix
    • By OnlyGuyWhoLikesTwix 13th Jul 18, 3:34 PM
    • 20 Posts
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    OnlyGuyWhoLikesTwix
    • #3
    • 13th Jul 18, 3:34 PM
    • #3
    • 13th Jul 18, 3:34 PM
    I have not approached. To be honest, he doesn't not appear to be the approachable type.
    Mortgage when started: 186500 (2 year fixed when taken out in 2016)
    Current mortgage (13/03/2018): 146,922.15 (5yr fixed 2.39% + 10% overpayment limit)
    Mortgage free day: 0?/0?/2025
    • comeandgo
    • By comeandgo 13th Jul 18, 3:44 PM
    • 2,104 Posts
    • 2,867 Thanks
    comeandgo
    • #4
    • 13th Jul 18, 3:44 PM
    • #4
    • 13th Jul 18, 3:44 PM
    What type is an unapproachable type? Speak to him, you have the problem, he or his workmen have caused it, ask if he would like help in moving it.
    You have made a lot of assumptions with this neighbor. He could be ill, some illnesses and drugs have side effects that make you stagger a bit.
    • OnlyGuyWhoLikesTwix
    • By OnlyGuyWhoLikesTwix 13th Jul 18, 3:46 PM
    • 20 Posts
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    OnlyGuyWhoLikesTwix
    • #5
    • 13th Jul 18, 3:46 PM
    • #5
    • 13th Jul 18, 3:46 PM
    Unapproachable as in usually carrying bags of alcohol back to his place. The one time I did knock on his door (he had taken in a parcel for me), he was stammering about, obviously drunk and told me to F off. I doubt he remembered the day after.

    That sort of unapproachable. I'm sure I'd get assurances that he would move it which he would also forget. And to be fair, I'm not concerned as to whether he has problems in life or with drugs. Sorry to sound heartless, but it's already evident that I would get nowhere talking to him. My hopes is the council would? I just don't know who, what, where or how to report it (to)
    Mortgage when started: 186500 (2 year fixed when taken out in 2016)
    Current mortgage (13/03/2018): 146,922.15 (5yr fixed 2.39% + 10% overpayment limit)
    Mortgage free day: 0?/0?/2025
    • Furts
    • By Furts 13th Jul 18, 4:58 PM
    • 4,399 Posts
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    Furts
    • #6
    • 13th Jul 18, 4:58 PM
    • #6
    • 13th Jul 18, 4:58 PM
    Why should taxpayers be funding council employees and departments whose role is partly to cover human beings who cannot be bothered to be proactive? But even if you do get the Council involved what do you expect them to do? It sounds like the items are stored on private land and belong to your neighbour. The Council are unlikey to clear the items - why should they? If a clearance did occur then somebody has to pay for this.



    Now consider your example. This has persisted for months - you admit this. You now say there are rats - quite likely. Those rats will likely be in your garden your shed and perhaps your home - you have done nothing. The solution is to discuss matters with your neighbour - you refuse to do this.



    The proactive solution is to clear the rubble. Clearly it does not bother the neighbour - so they do nothing. But it does bother you - so you sort it out. Be it a skip hire, or the cheap easy option - put it in a car/van and take it to your recycling centre.
    • OnlyGuyWhoLikesTwix
    • By OnlyGuyWhoLikesTwix 13th Jul 18, 5:18 PM
    • 20 Posts
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    OnlyGuyWhoLikesTwix
    • #7
    • 13th Jul 18, 5:18 PM
    • #7
    • 13th Jul 18, 5:18 PM
    I expect them to step in and ask him officially to remove the rubbish or do it for him as it's now a hazard. And yes now there are rats caused by his hazard. Yet for some reason you find a way to blame me for the whole thing? Because I'm the one who has the issue? Also as a taxpayer myself, why should the council not do it? What am I paying for if they are not supposed to aribrate in things such as these?


    I would like to see your reaction to a drunk neighbour who can barely look after himself telling you to F off. I'm sure you'd be more than willing to help him out then. Sorry but I am not mental health outreach. Surely this is where council representation comes in to resolve these sorts of issues?


    I'd be willing to pay for the removal however as the environmental health lady I spoke to said that as it is not on my land, I can't do it.



    So please, prey tell, am I to just let it sit there and rot? What if I want to sell my home in a few years, just ask the perspective buyers to kindly disregard the junk heap next to my home?
    Last edited by OnlyGuyWhoLikesTwix; 13-07-2018 at 5:21 PM.
    Mortgage when started: 186500 (2 year fixed when taken out in 2016)
    Current mortgage (13/03/2018): 146,922.15 (5yr fixed 2.39% + 10% overpayment limit)
    Mortgage free day: 0?/0?/2025
    • Ms Chocaholic
    • By Ms Chocaholic 13th Jul 18, 5:20 PM
    • 9,431 Posts
    • 57,768 Thanks
    Ms Chocaholic
    • #8
    • 13th Jul 18, 5:20 PM
    • #8
    • 13th Jul 18, 5:20 PM
    Can you pop round first thing before he's had chance to get too drunk
    Thrifty Till 50 Then Spend Till The End

    You can please some of the people some of the time, all of the people some of the time, some of the people all of the time but you can never please all of the people all of the time
    • OnlyGuyWhoLikesTwix
    • By OnlyGuyWhoLikesTwix 13th Jul 18, 5:27 PM
    • 20 Posts
    • 8 Thanks
    OnlyGuyWhoLikesTwix
    • #9
    • 13th Jul 18, 5:27 PM
    • #9
    • 13th Jul 18, 5:27 PM
    To be honest, and say what? I've no problem popping round and asking but the point is being the way he is, all I'll get is vague assurances to do so (as I did the initial request for him to remove the bag of junk about 18 months ago) and it never happens.


    I'd even be willing to pay for the removal, but what happens when he just dumps a load more stuff there?
    Mortgage when started: 186500 (2 year fixed when taken out in 2016)
    Current mortgage (13/03/2018): 146,922.15 (5yr fixed 2.39% + 10% overpayment limit)
    Mortgage free day: 0?/0?/2025
    • Furts
    • By Furts 13th Jul 18, 6:06 PM
    • 4,399 Posts
    • 2,847 Thanks
    Furts


    I would like to see your reaction to a drunk neighbour
    who can barely look after himself telling you to F off. I'm sure you'd be more than willing to help him out then. Sorry but I am not mental health outreach. Surely this is where council representation comes in to resolve these sorts of issues?


    I'd be willing to pay for the removal however as the environmental health lady I spoke to said that as it is not on my land, I can't do it.



    So please, prey tell, am I to just let it sit there and rot?
    Originally posted by OnlyGuyWhoLikesTwix
    In todays society there are people who are me, me, me. Such people can be believers in everything is somebody elses problem. Such people can be keyboard warriors, yet not be proactive.

    I will comment on the highlighted phrase above. I have recently been working in a flat for a gent with significant alcohol problems, and more besides. I spoke with the man, I built up rapport, and the repair works I funded and did myself. Damp, damage, rodents all resolved. This was being proactive because it was not my flat, not my tenacy, and I am not the landlord. This was simply a goodwill gesture to a fellow human being. It sorted out problems within the block of flats. It improved the lives of all the other tenants though why they had done nothing for years is a mystery to me. Equally predictable is only one flat showed any gratitude for the positive results.

    Your case is different - you will not talk to the neighbour. Of course you cannot move the items - they are the property of your neighbour. You say you are willing to pay - but you will not ask the neighbour for permission to move them nor will you offer to pay the neighbour. Which means you are being disingenuous.

    It is not that "you can't do it". It is that "you won't do it". Which means coming to the final bold phrase, "you will have to let it sit there" because your tone comes across as one who is not prepared to try and resolve matters. You are not being proactive, so live with what exists now.
    • Tranquil
    • By Tranquil 13th Jul 18, 6:16 PM
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    Tranquil
    I believe most people are sympathetic to this unfortunate man and I am sure everyone would try their best to help him if they could. It sounds like he is struggling with a lot in his life, so the rubbish outside his home would be his least concern.
    Despite the sad circumstances he is in and the empathy we should give our neighbours, you are completely within your rights to request council help through the environmental health department.
    They help remove neighbours' excessive rubbish if they has not been a local solution (i.e. him actively responding to your request to move it). They are used to this sort of request for any sort of reason. If you saw in the news recently, there was an article about 'student rubbish' left on the streets in the summer when they leave their flats and the council picks it up with no problem, although clearly prevention should be more important!

    So I think you should contact environmental health through your local authority council and take their advice. I think that is your only option, other than continuing to speak with him.
    I predict someone that vulnerable will already have health and social care professionals involved in supporting them so your 'complaint' may actually be helpful in the professionals assessing the support he needs (all councils will investigate why someone is not disposing of their rubbish properly if it is brought to their attention).
    Think of the similar situation in which you were concerned about a child's welfare or a domestic abuse situation - you would call for help immediately! I know this isn't in comparison to that in terms of severity, but the same principles apply - this person is struggling clearly and they need support.
    Good luck!
    • Furts
    • By Furts 13th Jul 18, 6:26 PM
    • 4,399 Posts
    • 2,847 Thanks
    Furts
    I believe most people are sympathetic to this unfortunate man and I am sure everyone would try their best to help him if they could. It sounds like he is struggling with a lot in his life, so the rubbish outside his home would be his least concern.
    Despite the sad circumstances he is in and the empathy we should give our neighbours, you are completely within your rights to request council help through the environmental health department.
    They help remove neighbours' excessive rubbish if they has not been a local solution (i.e. him actively responding to your request to move it). They are used to this sort of request for any sort of reason. If you saw in the news recently, there was an article about 'student rubbish' left on the streets in the summer when they leave their flats and the council picks it up with no problem, although clearly prevention should be more important!

    So I think you should contact environmental health through your local authority council and take their advice. I think that is your only option, other than continuing to speak with him.
    I predict someone that vulnerable will already have health and social care professionals involved in supporting them so your 'complaint' may actually be helpful in the professionals assessing the support he needs (all councils will investigate why someone is not disposing of their rubbish properly if it is brought to their attention).
    Think of the similar situation in which you were concerned about a child's welfare or a domestic abuse situation - you would call for help immediately! I know this isn't in comparison to that in terms of severity, but the same principles apply - this person is struggling clearly and they need support.
    Good luck!
    Originally posted by Tranquil

    I accept all this, but students rotting rubbish is in adifferent league to OP's situation. This situation is a neighbour who is storing rubble on his own car parking space. Nothing in that description could be deemed a health hazard. As for the rats - this is always said with every example. Who knows if they are there. But if so, why not put down a trap or some poison?
    • Tranquil
    • By Tranquil 13th Jul 18, 6:36 PM
    • 34 Posts
    • 20 Thanks
    Tranquil
    I accept all this, but students rotting rubbish is in adifferent league to OP's situation. This situation is a neighbour who is storing rubble on his own car parking space. Nothing in that description could be deemed a health hazard. As for the rats - this is always said with every example. Who knows if they are there. But if so, why not put down a trap or some poison?
    Originally posted by Furts
    My apologies, I wasn't clear - the article about student rubbish was not 'black bin' rubbish but things like desks, toasters etc.
    As far am I aware, it doesn't need to be a 'health hazard', by which I am assuming you mean rotting food? There aren't pre-defined categories for 'health hazard' rubbish and 'non health-hazard' rubbish, at least not in terms of excessive littering. At the very least, the OP said it wasn't just rubble but 'junk', so I assume that would come under your description of a health hazard.
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