Your browser isn't supported
It looks like you're using an old web browser. To get the most out of the site and to ensure guides display correctly, we suggest upgrading your browser now. Download the latest:

Welcome to the MSE Forums

We're home to a fantastic community of MoneySavers but anyone can post. Please exercise caution & report spam, illegal, offensive or libellous posts/messages: click "report" or email forumteam@.

Search
  • FIRST POST
    • SavvySaver24
    • By SavvySaver24 12th Jul 18, 8:09 PM
    • 36Posts
    • 9Thanks
    SavvySaver24
    Changing the locks....
    • #1
    • 12th Jul 18, 8:09 PM
    Changing the locks.... 12th Jul 18 at 8:09 PM
    Myself and my Partner are buying our first house (eeek excited!!). We said our first in would be to change the locks. Both sets of parents looked at us as if we were nuts and said they have NEVER changed the locks in ANY of their houses.

    Is this a wasted expense no one usually bothers with!?
Page 2
    • nyermen
    • By nyermen 13th Jul 18, 8:16 AM
    • 181 Posts
    • 135 Thanks
    nyermen
    Currently house hunting, and have seen my agent locking up with his set of keys, just as another agent arrives for a viewing with another set of keys. Who knows how many copies there are.

    So first on my list of two mandatory things to do on completion, is change the locks!
    (second is change the toilet seats!! )
    Peter

    Debt free - finally finished paying off 20k + Interest.
    • ScarletMarble
    • By ScarletMarble 13th Jul 18, 8:18 AM
    • 7,770 Posts
    • 13,990 Thanks
    ScarletMarble
    My parents never have changed the locks, but they have changed the burglar alarm code.
    • Margot123
    • By Margot123 13th Jul 18, 8:59 AM
    • 964 Posts
    • 981 Thanks
    Margot123
    Take a new set of locks when you first enter the property, and don't leave it till you've installed the new ones.
    • LandyAndy
    • By LandyAndy 13th Jul 18, 9:05 AM
    • 24,352 Posts
    • 51,457 Thanks
    LandyAndy
    I have never changed the locks.

    However on my current house I have at various times changed all four external doors so the locks are now different from those when I bought.
    • davidmcn
    • By davidmcn 13th Jul 18, 9:08 AM
    • 8,051 Posts
    • 8,327 Thanks
    davidmcn
    Take a new set of locks when you first enter the property, and don't leave it till you've installed the new ones.
    Originally posted by Margot123
    Or rather more sensibly, check what types of locks you need after you arrive, and then go out and buy them.
    • moneyistooshorttomention
    • By moneyistooshorttomention 13th Jul 18, 9:48 AM
    • 16,185 Posts
    • 44,582 Thanks
    moneyistooshorttomention
    It had slipped my mind re the one thing that happened to me - quite some time back.

    A previous tenant (that was back in the days I was renting) turned up and tried to get in. Courtesy of being "under the influence" he'd got it in his mind he still lived there Thankfully he wasnt able to let himself in (courtesy of a lock change) and the situation was resolved okay. But I don't fancy the thought of how things might have gone if he had just been able to let himself in...
    ****************
    • Norman Castle
    • By Norman Castle 13th Jul 18, 9:56 AM
    • 7,154 Posts
    • 5,932 Thanks
    Norman Castle
    Appreciate you can buy cheap locks but in terms of getting a locksmith to fit them how much are we talking?
    Originally posted by SavvySaver24
    If you have euro locks its easy to do yourself. Try removing and refitting one of your current locks.
    Spend the money you save by fitting them yourself on better locks.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X9A915L_mlk
    Don't harass a hippie. You'll get bad karma.

    Never trust a newbie with a rtb tale.
    • Davesnave
    • By Davesnave 13th Jul 18, 9:59 AM
    • 25,587 Posts
    • 93,607 Thanks
    Davesnave
    Or rather more sensibly, check what types of locks you need after you arrive, and then go out and buy them.
    Originally posted by davidmcn
    Yes, mortice locks in particular aren't all the same size, so having the old one to measure is important.
    If you are finding huge gaps between your paragraphs, MSE know about the problem. However, they aren't necessarily doing anything about it. More changes on the way?
    https://forums.moneysavingexpert.com/showthread.php?t=5844460
    • pinkteapot
    • By pinkteapot 13th Jul 18, 10:09 AM
    • 6,192 Posts
    • 7,979 Thanks
    pinkteapot
    I've never bothered.
    • Out, Vile Jelly
    • By Out, Vile Jelly 13th Jul 18, 10:21 AM
    • 4,031 Posts
    • 13,705 Thanks
    Out, Vile Jelly
    My front door has two locks, I just changed the Yale (a few quid from B&Q, plus 4 mins of my dad's time with a screwdriver). I bought in a probate sale from an elderly lady who had carers and a gardener and who knows what else coming round.

    After all those years renting when you had the LL, agent, agent's dodgy handyman and x number of former tenants with potential access, it was really nice to know it was just me who could get in.
    They are an EYESORES!!!!
    • wesleyad
    • By wesleyad 13th Jul 18, 11:37 AM
    • 240 Posts
    • 184 Thanks
    wesleyad
    Appreciate you can buy cheap locks but in terms of getting a locksmith to fit them how much are we talking?
    Originally posted by SavvySaver24
    I honestly wouldn't know about a locksmith...but please check out how easy it is to do first. It's normally a couple of screws from the side and then put key in and turn to 10 o'clock and pull out barrel. There's not drilling etc (maybe you are thinking of when locksmiths come round to drill locks, that's when they dont have a key).

    I kid you not, my mum rang me a few weeks ago to tell me she'd done it for my sister's new house. If you've never met my mum, she's the sort or person that would struggle to know the right end of a hammer.

    Barrels from 10 at screwfix etc.
    • Small Yeti
    • By Small Yeti 13th Jul 18, 12:07 PM
    • 48 Posts
    • 80 Thanks
    Small Yeti
    Between buying our house and moving in we had to do a fair bit of work (no kitchen/bad electrics and plumbing/boiler was going to kill us etc.) It was a nightmare and the whole process resembled film The Money Pit. For one month we had lovely workmen coming in and out. And the previous owner . He would arrive in the middle of the night and have a snoop around to see what we had been doing. We discovered it was happening but couldn't prove it. One of the neighbours even saw him in the house moving stuff out late in the day when we completed (at 9am) when we allegedly had all the keys.


    We had already booked the locksmith to change the locks for our last day of workmen, who all cheered when it was done. They had noticed things like the biscuits we had stocked up for them were disappearing overnight, a couple of cups went missing and so did some towels we left so they could wash their hands (when the owner showed us round he had slung a towel over his shoulder after he's washed his hands - I guess he did the same with ours and realised later).



    I have seen him lurking around since so it is very nice to know the locks are safe now!
    • Smodlet
    • By Smodlet 13th Jul 18, 12:32 PM
    • 3,483 Posts
    • 6,701 Thanks
    Smodlet
    I don't think anyone has mentioned the insurance implications, should the worst happen. Claims tend to depend on proof of forced entry, as far as I know. Just puttin' that out there.
    What is this life if, sweet wordsmith, we have no time to take the pith?
    Every stew starts with the first onion.
    I took it upon myself to investigate a trifle; it had custard, jelly, soggy sponge things...
    • moneyistooshorttomention
    • By moneyistooshorttomention 13th Jul 18, 2:02 PM
    • 16,185 Posts
    • 44,582 Thanks
    moneyistooshorttomention
    That was my impression too Smodlet - so, even if one hadnt managed to stop them in their tracks, then there would still be upset - but at least there wouldnt be financial loss.
    ****************
    • Nasqueron
    • By Nasqueron 13th Jul 18, 2:11 PM
    • 4,975 Posts
    • 3,013 Thanks
    Nasqueron
    Some of us live in places where doors are rarely locked. Sadly, I think that's probably changing.

    There was one house burglary in our village last year; the first for many years, but it was opportunists from outside the area, which meant they were recognised as suspicious by locals. Lurk here, and you'll be noticed and quite probably spoken to. These guys cleared off after only one theft, but it was one too many.

    A good pair of neighbour's eyes + a brain that cares enough is still a useful addition to whatever security devices people have.
    Originally posted by Davesnave
    My other half's mum lives in a tiny village (about 200 people) in the middle of Yorkshire where everyone knows each other. She still locks the door when she goes out, it's just common sense because people can still pass through for whatever reason and strangers or not, could still get an opportunist burglar who was out to scout the farms for stuff to pinch
    • Davesnave
    • By Davesnave 13th Jul 18, 2:29 PM
    • 25,587 Posts
    • 93,607 Thanks
    Davesnave
    My other half's mum lives in a tiny village (about 200 people) in the middle of Yorkshire where everyone knows each other. She still locks the door when she goes out, it's just common sense because people can still pass through for whatever reason and strangers or not, could still get an opportunist burglar who was out to scout the farms for stuff to pinch
    Originally posted by Nasqueron
    That's exactly what my post implied, but the chance of having the house burgled here is still slim; it's much more likely to be an outhouse or barn. We keep chain saws in the house and we lock our doors.

    And despite there being a residential centre for troubled young people here, only one vehicle has gone missing in my time here, but even that was only 'borrowed' to get to Exeter.

    The biggest theft in my time, never solved, was the rustling of 39 sheep in broad daylight, when no one saw anything!
    Last edited by Davesnave; 13-07-2018 at 2:31 PM.
    If you are finding huge gaps between your paragraphs, MSE know about the problem. However, they aren't necessarily doing anything about it. More changes on the way?
    https://forums.moneysavingexpert.com/showthread.php?t=5844460
    • scottishblondie
    • By scottishblondie 13th Jul 18, 2:35 PM
    • 2,009 Posts
    • 1,296 Thanks
    scottishblondie
    There was a thread on here, last year maybe, where a couple came downstairs to find the ex-partner of the woman they had bought the house from. He was still under the impression that he owned the house, and was rather put out that they were there. I would say definitely change the locks!! We will be when we move to our new house.
    • the_quick
    • By the_quick 13th Jul 18, 3:58 PM
    • 72 Posts
    • 41 Thanks
    the_quick
    Yes, we did it in first 24h. Prices ranging from low 20 to high 40 - all depends of quality of the lock. I think you can justify that amount of money, to secure you possession , in case someone has a spare old key.
    • StumpyPumpy
    • By StumpyPumpy 13th Jul 18, 6:18 PM
    • 1,263 Posts
    • 3,408 Thanks
    StumpyPumpy
    The biggest theft in my time, never solved, was the rustling of 39 sheep in broad daylight, when no one saw anything!
    Originally posted by Davesnave
    No one might have seen anything but surely, if they were rustled someone must have heard them.

    SP
    Come on people, it's not difficult: lose means to be unable to find, loose means not being fixed in place. So if you have a hole in your pocket you might lose your loose change.
    • moneyistooshorttomention
    • By moneyistooshorttomention 13th Jul 18, 6:26 PM
    • 16,185 Posts
    • 44,582 Thanks
    moneyistooshorttomention
    Actually Dave - even in those smaller/more remote areas where "no-one locks their door still" - I spent some time trying to warn a friend that they MUST lock their door or they were asking for trouble.

    Logically too - surely no burglar in their right senses would have tried to get in their downright tatty/one of the cheaper houses there by far type house. I never did manage to persuade them - until the time they came face-to-face with a would-be burglar inside their house....

    I resisted the temptation to say "Told you so" to them...

    But I'd also spent time trying to persuade them to eat a healthier diet/be more careful with their money/give up smoking/generally take more care of their health. I was wasting my breath on the lot and it's the first time it's struck me - but I guess NOT changing the locks on one's doors is one of the things that also comes with being in "Self Destructive Mode" as I call it.

    Thinking of someone else I know that hasnt had a burglary yet - but is clearly "asking" for it with their lack of security precautions. They are also a self-destructive type of person in a variety of ways.
    Last edited by moneyistooshorttomention; 13-07-2018 at 6:33 PM.
    ****************
Welcome to our new Forum!

Our aim is to save you money quickly and easily. We hope you like it!

Forum Team Contact us

Live Stats

1,063Posts Today

6,814Users online

Martin's Twitter